Job Prospects ECE vs CS for SoftEng

arviny
Posted: 7:05AM May 14, 2011 UTC
Which program offers better job prospects in terms of salary, doing software engineering in electrical and computer engineering at UofT or CS at UofT (St. George) 
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inyoface
Posted: 7:05AM May 14, 2011 UTC
you cannot do a pure software engineering degree. UofT forces you to choose 2 areas to specialize in. Most people pair software with hardware. So I suppose engineering gives you more options. In terms of job prospects I think they are similar. I personally know 2 people in my year that are currently working for Microsoft and I'm sure there are CS folks from UofT in my year who are currently working for Microsoft. Salary is largely similar too, in that you work your way up. Most people start off at entry level, which pays similarly regardless of whether you are ECE or CS.

Edit:
Actually I'm curious as to whether you can legally call yourself a software engineer without an engineering degree in Canada.
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Anonymous
Posted: 7:05AM May 14, 2011 UTC
@inyoface wrote
you cannot do a pure software engineering degree. UofT forces you to choose 2 areas to specialize in. Most people pair software with hardware. So I suppose engineering gives you more options. In terms of job prospects I think they are similar. I personally know 2 people in my year that are currently working for Microsoft and I'm sure there are CS folks from UofT in my year who are currently working for Microsoft. Salary is largely similar too, in that you work your way up. Most people start off at entry level, which pays similarly regardless of whether you are ECE or CS.

Edit:
Actually I'm curious as to whether you can legally call yourself a software engineer without an engineering degree in Canada.



"There is a minimum educational level stipulated by the Professional Engineers Act. Council policy has established a three-year diploma in technology from a College of Applied Arts and Technology, a bachelor's degree in a relevant science area or academic qualifications deemed by the Council to be equivalent to a diploma or degree mentioned above as the minimum academic qualifications.If your overall academic preparation is assessed by PEO to meet the minimum level stipulated by legislation (this includes graduates of a technology or science program), you will be assigned a Specific Examination Program."

This is for PEO not sure if same rules apply to call yourself an engineer?
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arviny
Thread Creator
Posted: 7:05AM May 15, 2011 UTC
Thread Creator
@pj2121 wrote

@inyoface wrote
you cannot do a pure software engineering degree. UofT forces you to choose 2 areas to specialize in. Most people pair software with hardware. So I suppose engineering gives you more options. In terms of job prospects I think they are similar. I personally know 2 people in my year that are currently working for Microsoft and I'm sure there are CS folks from UofT in my year who are currently working for Microsoft. Salary is largely similar too, in that you work your way up. Most people start off at entry level, which pays similarly regardless of whether you are ECE or CS.

Edit:
Actually I'm curious as to whether you can legally call yourself a software engineer without an engineering degree in Canada.



"There is a minimum educational level stipulated by the Professional Engineers Act. Council policy has established a three-year diploma in technology from a College of Applied Arts and Technology, a bachelor's degree in a relevant science area or academic qualifications deemed by the Council to be equivalent to a diploma or degree mentioned above as the minimum academic qualifications.If your overall academic preparation is assessed by PEO to meet the minimum level stipulated by legislation (this includes graduates of a technology or science program), you will be assigned a Specific Examination Program."

This is for PEO not sure if same rules apply to call yourself an engineer?







The you get a P.Eng from PEO if you graduate from UofT Engineering doing PEY, but for CS you won't get that. That's what makes me wonder, who gets the better jobs and has it better off? 
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inyoface
Posted: 7:05AM May 15, 2011 UTC
If you are dead set on doing software, I don't think either program has an advantage over the other. The work experience from PEY is good, but if you do well in CS I don't think you'd have too much trouble finding internships. Same goes for engineering students.
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waazup
Posted: 7:05AM May 15, 2011 UTC
Both CS and SE will give the same result. Yes, almost all the "software engineer" jobs require a degree in computer science or equivelant, so you CAN legally call yourself that. There are many better CS students than SE, vice versa - just depends on how good you are and where you work, with other factors. CS is harder in the theoretical and thinking aspect, whereas SE is harder in terms of workload during undergrad, but have relatively easier courses or so I have heard, they just have more of them. You have to remember that SE is a newer program introduced after CS because it involves hardware also. All in all, you can choose either.
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inyoface
Posted: 7:05AM May 15, 2011 UTC
@waazup wrote
Both CS and SE will give the same result. Yes, almost all the "software engineer" jobs require a degree in computer science or equivelant, so you CAN legally call yourself that. There are many better CS students than SE, vice versa - just depends on how good you are and where you work, with other factors. CS is harder in the theoretical and thinking aspect, whereas SE is harder in terms of workload during undergrad, but have relatively easier courses or so I have heard, they just have more of them. You have to remember that SE is a newer program introduced after CS because it involves hardware also. All in all, you can choose either.



Aha! I will leave this thread to you as you're probably more informed than I am :). But yes I agree with everything you said above.
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arviny
Thread Creator
Posted: 7:05AM May 15, 2011 UTC
Thread Creator
@waazup wrote
Both CS and SE will give the same result. Yes, almost all the "software engineer" jobs require a degree in computer science or equivelant, so you CAN legally call yourself that. There are many better CS students than SE, vice versa - just depends on how good you are and where you work, with other factors. CS is harder in the theoretical and thinking aspect, whereas SE is harder in terms of workload during undergrad, but have relatively easier courses or so I have heard, they just have more of them. You have to remember that SE is a newer program introduced after CS because it involves hardware also. All in all, you can choose either.



I'm fairly informed on the courses and workloads for each, but what concerns me the most is after graduation. But I definitely have to agree with your point about better CS students than SE students and vise versa. Depends on how well you perform in your stream. I'm starting to lean towards CS because the courses are more relevant to software design (example the math courses and theory), compared to SE where you study physics and circuits.

But the P.Eng is kind of bugging me and I keep thinking the ECE students are always more successful since UofT engineering is one of the best in the world. 
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aimango
Posted: 7:05AM May 17, 2011 UTC
@arviny wrote

@waazup wrote
Both CS and SE will give the same result. Yes, almost all the "software engineer" jobs require a degree in computer science or equivelant, so you CAN legally call yourself that. There are many better CS students than SE, vice versa - just depends on how good you are and where you work, with other factors. CS is harder in the theoretical and thinking aspect, whereas SE is harder in terms of workload during undergrad, but have relatively easier courses or so I have heard, they just have more of them. You have to remember that SE is a newer program introduced after CS because it involves hardware also. All in all, you can choose either.



I'm fairly informed on the courses and workloads for each, but what concerns me the most is after graduation. But I definitely have to agree with your point about better CS students than SE students and vise versa. Depends on how well you perform in your stream. I'm starting to lean towards CS because the courses are more relevant to software design (example the math courses and theory), compared to SE where you study physics and circuits.

But the P.Eng is kind of bugging me and I keep thinking the ECE students are always more successful since UofT engineering is one of the best in the world. 


our reasons for wanting CS and SE are pretty legitimate, you're the first guy I've seen on this forum that actually seems to understand the programs and have done good research. so props to you.

UofT Eng is really well known throughout the world, but prestige does not always mean it's the best fit. & of course I'm sure you already know CompEng at UofT would be more hardware overall compared to SE at Waterloo.  
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arviny
Thread Creator
Posted: 7:05AM May 17, 2011 UTC
Thread Creator
@aimango wrote

@arviny wrote

@waazup wrote
Both CS and SE will give the same result. Yes, almost all the "software engineer" jobs require a degree in computer science or equivelant, so you CAN legally call yourself that. There are many better CS students than SE, vice versa - just depends on how good you are and where you work, with other factors. CS is harder in the theoretical and thinking aspect, whereas SE is harder in terms of workload during undergrad, but have relatively easier courses or so I have heard, they just have more of them. You have to remember that SE is a newer program introduced after CS because it involves hardware also. All in all, you can choose either.



I'm fairly informed on the courses and workloads for each, but what concerns me the most is after graduation. But I definitely have to agree with your point about better CS students than SE students and vise versa. Depends on how well you perform in your stream. I'm starting to lean towards CS because the courses are more relevant to software design (example the math courses and theory), compared to SE where you study physics and circuits.

But the P.Eng is kind of bugging me and I keep thinking the ECE students are always more successful since UofT engineering is one of the best in the world. 


our reasons for wanting CS and SE are pretty legitimate, you're the first guy I've seen on this forum that actually seems to understand the programs and have done good research. so props to you.

UofT Eng is really well known throughout the world, but prestige does not always mean it's the best fit. & of course I'm sure you already know CompEng at UofT would be more hardware overall compared to SE at Waterloo.  




Yes, the Engineering material isn't really my thing. I like the courses in CS more, it looks like a better fit for me and probably do much better. As long as I do really well, it won't matter if I graduated from Engineering or CS. 
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waazup
Posted: 7:05AM May 18, 2011 UTC
@arviny wrote


Yes, the Engineering material isn't really my thing. I like the courses in CS more, it looks like a better fit for me and probably do much better. As long as I do really well, it won't matter if I graduated from Engineering or CS. 




Dude, +1 on that..I feel the same way. CS seems more "on-the-task", SE also maintains this but also does extra hardware-related material which is pretty useful I guess, since it is an engineering program. 

I'm also one who likes math, definitely over science, so I will probably be applying to CS since I will be able to use proper math techniques here.. :bounce: 
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