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2nd year UBC student! Ask me anything!

Contact: elizabethsflower@gmail.com 

In second year at UBC as a Health Science (FNH) student from LFS. 

Want to know how I got in? What UBC life is like? General advice about gr. 12/senior year, study tips, and applying to universities? I'll try my best to answer any of your inquiries (:

See you at UBC in September!
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What was you average and pp like? Are you an out of province student? Did you get any scholarships? Sorry for so many questions!
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There's no need to be scared to ask lots of questions (: That's why I'm here.

I'm a domestic BC student! UBC does offer many scholarships, with the most common being the Major Entrance Scholarship (1 time awards of $5000) that you would have automatically been considered for if you submitted your application on December 10th. It's a very competitive pool though, so I'm not surprised that I didn't receive one. In addition to the MES there's also the UBC Entrance Award (which you apply for separately if you meet the criteria) that gives out financial aid up to $40 000. All of this is on the UBC website so you can refer back to it.

I had an 89.7-90 average when I applied! The cut-offs for last year fluctuated a tiny bit: I had some classmates who got in with low 80s, even a 78%! Of course, it depends on faculty. Science is still super competitive at 92%+; Sauder at 93-96%. UBC's pretty unpredictable when it comes to admissions. What you have to know however is that if your average is mid 80s-90s and above, you're set for consideration.

The PP is what really shows UBC your well-roundedness. My PP was quite variable. I was a youth leader at my local church, tutored younger grades in high school, worked as a department intern at PNE for three years, volunteered at my parents' hospital and nursing home, travelled to Haiti in a social justice group (and helped coordinate the trip), won speech arts, visual arts and journalism awards when I was younger, and many more. I put in what I was passionate about and what I LEARNED out of all my experiences.

I can say they're looking for ECs etc. that influenced/inspired/changed you. PP doesn't have to be perfect. Try to handpick ones that are meaningful to you; they don't have to be ambitious - if your writing sounds genuine you're good to go.
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Do u think and 89 avg and decent ec will get into arts??
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89's pretty strong for Arts. What kind of ECs do you have?

Good tip for everyone: UBC definitely doesn't rely on grades alone to consider you, so you all have a fair chance of getting in. For example, if you have low grades but an excellent PP you'll most likely receive an offer. It also depends on how many spots are available.

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Hi:)

I really want to go to UBC, and hopefully will. Since you are in health sciences, what courses did you take in Grade 12? Like what would you suggest i take? So far I am thinking Bio, Chem, PreCalc, and English. I have 4 more courses to fill :/ Also what is some advice you could give me for getting accepted?

Thank You!!!
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The science courses I took were Honours Bio, Precalculus and Chemistry (besides Honours English, Fine Arts and Law). Precalc, Chem and Bio are for sure the main courses you should take if you plan on going into Health Science, Science or the medical field in general! In health sciences there's a big emphasis on biochemistry. Having a foundation in both is recommended. If you're up for it, you can also take Physics later on, but again, it depends on faculty and what you choose to do (: And if your schedule allows, try throwing in a few GPA booster courses at your school. That's always something to not miss out on.

I intend to get a bachelor's, master's or PhD degree in nursing, so Physics barely plays a role, except I may choose the doctor path afterwards (and that's when I need to take Physics...it's a minor part of the MCAT).

Just put ample time and effort into writing your PP! Talk about what things in your life sparked something. You can be philosophical (; High grades are obviously the major factor, but the thought counts! Be unique and be yourself. You can do it!
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Hello, I am a grade 11 student in BC. I believe that (based on my current marks), I can pull off an average of 95% for my top four marks that I send to post secondary. However, I lack in extra curricular activities. I have over 300 hours of volunteer (community centres, retirement homes, etc.), have taken drawing lessons and piano lessons for two years, and was in a language school for 3 years(outside of secondary school) that had a class every week where I won 3 first place awards for these classes. However, I have yet to join any clubs in school. What organizations can I join in/out of school that can boost my chances of getting into UBC?Will my current ECs lower my chances of getting into UBC sciences or Sauder? How else can I better my chances? Thanks in advance!
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Sounds like you already have a super solid background for admission! And I think 95%+ is the basic average for this year's Science and Sauder admission pool (below 95% is also guaranteed).

For Science and Sauder, your current ECs won't "lower" your chances, but what other ECs do you have that are unique enough to you or original to you? How exactly do they play a role in determining the way you perceive yourself? UBC PPs are broad, so you can include ECs that, say, aren't as common for Sauder and Science applicants! They'll make you stand out from others. Like I said before, be as genuine as possible (:

You can go out of your comfort zone and aim for organizations/clubs that you're passionate about or never had an inclination for. One suggestion is Student Council. I know it sounds daunting for most people haha, but running as a candidate can give you more confidence and leeway to do great things! Other suggestions are social-oriented, hands-on clubs like Social Justice, Science Clubs (outside school, you can join organizations that inspire or give you a reason to be inspired. Look for local organizations or charities near you that can give you the opportunity!) etc. What clubs do you think suit you the best or allow you to try new things? If you can truly explain to UBC how your school clubs shaped who you are as a person then you should be good enough in their eyes to be admitted.

I think you were always good enough (: Don't try too hard to compare yourself against others! Being your own person is what matters.
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How have you balanced your academics and social life so far at UBC? What led you to decide UBC?
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It isn't difficult to do well if you have the study habits and motivation, aka it isn't too easy to get in, but it's easy to get an A. Academics-wise UBC is course-heavy and not as flexible with courses...a stereotype that's actually true :P So, it's a little hard to find time to de-stress when you want to.

The social life is teeming! People are energetic and hyped all around you, and school pride is at insane levels. There can be depressing weather (believe me, UBC looks like a sad hole on cloudy, rainy days). Campus is gorgeous - especially when the sun's out - and because it's reasonably close to downtown you can commute. Shopping on Robson and strolling by English Bay with friends are my personal de-stressers. I made sure to have good gaps between my classes just for that. (: Acadia Beach is another must, with lots of wildlife, fresh air and pretty ocean views.

If you really want to get the most out of UBC and make new friends or form a social life then the clubs are the place to be at. There's the Origami club, Dance, Coin and Stamp (if you're a collector's nerd), and lots more! You'll immediately find your element because the clubs at UBC are super diverse! Then there's the weekly parties thrown by sororities, fraternities and clubs alongside themed dances (fluorescent glow themes are awesome). The restaurants and food can be expensive yet worth splurging (I suggest Ike cafe, Mercante and The Point Grill: you'll find me hanging out there often).

I chose UBC because - although reputation was a bonus for me - it made me feel like I was home at home. Vancouver is honestly such a lovely place, and the people, professors, atmosphere and future opportunities at UBC make all the stress and hours of commuting I go through worth it.
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Hello!

I just have a few quick questions. First of all, does UBC look at your grade 12 average mark (based on the courses you take during the school year) or only the four that you choose? Do we submit all of our marks regardless of whether or not they are part of the four? Secondly, I have been wondering for a while now if UBC places higher or lower than University of Toronto, Alberta, and McGill. Do you happen to have obtained any knowledge on this when you submitted your applications to different universities? Lastly, what are some benefits or consequences of having classes in the morning, classes in the afternoon, classes altogether, and classes with gaps/breaks in between? Sorry for all the questions, but I really do appreciate it!
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Hi! UBC has a list of approved courses you can look at for Grade 12, so any of the courses you're taking that are on the list will be used to calculate your admissions average. It's different for everyone. During self-reporting, you pick your BEST four courses according to your program prerequisites and the approved courses list.

UBC tied with McGill for 2nd place in Canada among the top 100 worldwide universities last year while UofT was in 1st place; for the top 40 worldwide university rankings UofT was 1st, McGill 2nd and UBC 3rd (University of Montreal and UofA were 4th and 5th). Overall we've been placing a bit lower than McGill and UofT and a bit higher than UofA in recent years. They're all brilliant schools though - no questions there. While submitting my applications for UofT and McGill I personally learned that both were pretty broad-based when it came to admissions...they were slightly more lenient than UBC. I got accepted to McGill for Health Sciences but unfortunately couldn't attend because I didn't have the money to move across the country and live on residence. Same story with UofT; UBC was my first choice anyway.

On the "wise" side of things, reputation isn't the important factor when it comes to the post-secondary choices you'll make. It can matter for some (e.g. the prestige makes you renowned and your degree gets you somewhere), but it's what you do with your choices and how well you perform in the field you like!

If you're commuting and don't live on UBC residence, morning classes are a pain!! It's also worse if your distance from UBC is further away. We're talking Richmond and Surrey. The only benefits you can get from morning classes are if you have 20 to 30 minute breaks in-between once your morning classes are over. Having morning classes back to back without stopping for 4-5 hours straight burns me out and my brain won't work as efficiently as it should in class :P That's why I made sure I had 1-2 hour breaks between a couple classes for this Jan-April semester. Afternoon classes are the forgiving ones! You have time in the mornings to take breathers, sleep in, or catch up on homework/studying.

A little bit of both morning and afternoon classes is okay if you have a metal mind or get enough sleep at home (which entirely isn't the case for me), so I try to space out my schedule as soon as I can enroll for my next semester because spots run out quickly! Days off are sheer miracles.

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Does UBC look at grade 11 marks?
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They review your Grade 11 marks if you want to be considered for early admission, but Grade 12 marks are the priority. UBC calculates your admissions average SOLELY on your Grade 12 approved courses.
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Do you think a 90 average is good enough to get into comp-sci or engineering? Also, when do acceptances come out for those who are from Ontario?
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90 is quite solid! I have friends who got into Engineering with 91 or so. To improve your chances of getting in, make sure your personal profile is strong (read my previous responses to others for tips). Engineering's one of the more competitive programs in Applied Science. For computer science, I'd say around the 90s is the general average too. Sometimes it can be lower.

UBC lends offers on a rolling basis, so I'm sure they don't take where you live into consideration (the admission deadlines for different provinces are just for organized convenience because UBC receives a huge amount of applications each year :P). If you submitted your grades and self-reported as early as possible (and self-reporting dates are also different for different provinces), you should be getting an offer in mid-March or April. UBC's admission offers go out until mid-June, sometimes July at the latest.
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How much of a loser do you have to be to get into UBC??
please reply quickly, I need to know
thanks d00d
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Wow, you don't have to act like a loser on here dude.
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I am hoping to get into UBC's Food, Land, System but I am worried about chemistry. What was the course load like? and how did you prepare for your mid-terms and finals?

What courses did you take as a first year student in FLS?

are you planning on studying a semester abroad or summer abroad?
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You're not alone - Chemistry used to scare me too! All I did was practice, practice, practice. Practice is key (: If I don't get a certain concept, equation or answer, I would gradually work my way through and pinpoint where I had gone wrong. Then, I reapply myself until I understand them to the best of my ability. Seeking out tutors and extra help is super beneficial: there's no harm in honing your skills even more! Everyone has room for improvement.

I'm required to take Chemistry, Biology, English, Math (Calculus for Biological/Life Sciences) and a few Land and Food System courses. Chem, Biology, English and LFS involve TONS of reading! I always try to make sure I'm on top of the chapters, so that once I'm in class I can grasp the material easily. Math is, like Chemistry, a rigorous course of practice! You should practice as much as you can in order to completely absorb skill after skill you're being taught/introduced to.

It may be utterly cruel at first, but you're going through the same stress as everyone else. Soon enough you find yourself getting used to your new studies and way of doing things! To prepare for mid-terms/finals, I review my notes and readings after each class and start practicing. Studying in 1-2 hour increments every day (when I can, of course) lends me more time to go over the rest of the material in detail. By the time exams come around, I feel confident and don't have to cram (I still cram sometimes, but that's because my course load can get unmanageable haha - cramming, for me, is honestly inevitable in the life of a Health Sciences student).

And hm, abroad studies I'm still thinking about. I'd like to study in the UK!
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I was wondering when you received your acceptance into FLS. I am waiting anxiously for mine since I submitted before Dec 10th and self reported on march 5th. I have an average of 92%
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I got an offer around early April, if I remember correctly. 92% is a very good average for LFS! Like I said before UBC sends out offers on a rolling basis, so whether or not you submitted your application earlier doesn't change your chances of consideration compared to everyone else. I just predict you should be receiving a decision soon (because you submitted everything early), but UBC deals with a huge mountain of applications. It's all about being patient (: I experienced that, and it IS the most stressful thing you could possibly feel during this time! Wishing you luck!!
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Elizabeth, you seem like such a good student. Do you mind me asking how your first year GPA was? Wre you happy/surprised at your gpa (because i hear it changes a lot from high school easy A and I'm so so scared).

Also, in uni, in a whole course, are there only like 1 or 2 midterms and 1 final? And that's it? or  like high school, are there chapter tests/many quizzes, + 1 or 2 midterms + 1 final?


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Aw thank you so much anon -- I don't particularly think I'm a "good" student but I try my best haha! 

My overall first year GPA was approx. 2.9 - 3.0 (based on 4 courses in the first term/4 courses in the second term), which, surprisingly, is quite good for first year UBC students like me who struggled a bit when we were introduced to a slightly intense workload & a completely new academic environment! It's a large step up from high school -- good study habits that work for you are essential! And don't ever be afraid/beat yourself up over your first year GPA: it's absolutely normal to, say, get a GPA of around 2.0-2.5 (equivalent to a C in most cases; some classes use different GPA scales). New university students often become overwhelmed due to the many changes that occur in their schedule, their workload, and their responsibilities compared to high school; facing difficulty in your first year is never uncommon! Us older university students have gone through the same experiences, and trust us when we say you do get accustomed to everything -- it's very easy once you enter the thick of university life. Think of the entire process as a bike...the more you practice and ride, the more it seems natural to you! Academic standards change, and so do we (: 

It depends on the professor/course! Some of the courses I took contained one midterm, weekly quizzes (online, on paper, or both), and one final, while others had us write two midterms, a final, and a few essays/papers. Gone are the days where all your high school courses usually had the same syllabus [a standard course at my high school was comprised of multiple quizzes, unit tests, one midterm, & one final] -- there are even courses that have NO final exams and instead give us a final paper/project! 



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I have the same question as a poster above, and that is regarding UBC looking at grade 11 marks. Do they look at every single course you take (including electives like foods, graphics, photography, etc.) or simply your academic courses? Also, do they really weigh in on these marks (since there's not a lot of other marks for grade 12) for early admission or do they only look to see that you haven't failed any courses? Any additional information would be great!
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They look at your academic courses. I mentioned in one of my replies that UBC has a list of approved Grade 12 courses which are used to calculate your admissions average. If your Grade 11 marks are high, your application is "jump started"; in other words you'll be assessed faster ("early admission" - self-explanatory) and will be evaluated with any COMPLETED Grade 12 courses e.g. ones you finish during a semester school year, but your ongoing Grade 12 courses will be the main focus. Interim/Spring report cards are heavily weighted and your grades from that Grade 12 report card are used to calculate your admissions average. UBC can offer conditional acceptance as well, meaning you must retain your current competitive average/a range close to your average when admitted in order to keep your admission offer.

Note: failing a course in Grade 11 or having low marks does NOT affect your chances. I had a hard Grade 11 year and did not have such stellar marks, yet UBC focused on my Grade 12 marks and assessed me based on those marks alone. Higher Grade 11 marks would just allow you to receive an earlier offer of admission in mid-April compared to other applicants.
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Thank you for your response! As for looking at grade 11 marks, I just found out today that my physics marks this term dropped to an 88% :(. If I do not take physics 12, will there be any reason for UBC to see this mark? Or will they only look at this mark if I take physics 12 during the school year (for early admissions). Also, I read in another thread that UBC does not look at grade 11 marks if I attend a linear school system, is this true?
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Does your program choice call for Physics 12 as a pre-requisite?

If you do take Physics 12, UBC will look at the course once you FINISH it by the time early admissions evaluation period arrives (around late November, and like I said before, early admission applicants receive offers in February/beginning of March: the early admission offers period, as general offers are given out usually in mid-March to May/June).

If you haven't finished Physics 12 when the early admissions evaluation period passes, it would become a self-reporting interim course, and UBC may take your Physics 11 mark into consideration. If you do not have Physics 12, I'm afraid it can't be used as part of your top 4 courses during self-reporting, and you would need to pick another approved course (unless Physics 12 is a REQUIRED pre-requisite; a program most often cannot consider you if a required pre-requisite's missing). Remember, Grade 12 marks are the sole basis for calculating your admissions average.

Linear school systems don't complete their courses until the end of the school year in most cases, which is why Spring interim marks are taken by UBC for self-reporting (March/April). Since Grade 12 marks are "interim completed", this time is no longer the early admissions period. So yes, UBC does not look at Grade 11 marks if your school system is linear. However, make sure you ask an academics advisor for further clarification on early admissions - I may have misleading/incorrect information or protocol may have changed since I was admitted...better to be safe than sorry! (:
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What is the purpose of sending 5-6 courses to UBC when you only need to send in four? My train of thought is that the less courses you send in, the higher the average because you're only sending in your very best. Please correct me if I'm wrong. :)
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Ahh yes I wasn't thorough! You may have more than 4 courses you're doing very well in, but on the SSC you enter your BEST four courses. So sorry for not being clear! I'll be editing one of my responses (:

I'm receiving a lot of questions and I'm doing my best to answer all of them as soon as I can.
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Can you describe to me both the good and bad of UBC's co-op? I've been wondering how this program works and would love to have a bit more information on it. Does UBC give students the opportunity to study abroad? If so, where? Thanks for answering!
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Thanks for the inquiry!

Unfortunately I'm not as knowledgeable with UBC co-op (you can consult academic advisors for a full rundown), but what I do know is that co-op programs are excellent at UBC: you're able to gain experience in your field within a real, non-simulated environment; your work is paid, and co-ops allow for massive chances of employment from related companies. Co-op programs are usually offered between third and fourth year, as the closer you get to graduation, the more you prepare for the workforce you'll be entering.

And yes, you can study abroad (co-op or normal studies)! This is called the Go Global program at UBC. If you desire to complete co-op abroad, you must be registered in UBC's Co-op program. The general case is that you can transfer the credits you receive abroad to your UBC credits/degree (normal studies). There's an extensive list of available exchange locations on UBC's Go Global website (:
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What marks does UBC focus on the most? Grade 12 terms one and/or two? Grade 11?
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Answered this previously (: Please scroll through the thread. Thanks!
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Hi! I'm also a student from BC and I was just wondering, would taking calculus in high school help me in university? My school offers a calculus course, but it is extremely difficult and most people would be satisfied with a 70%, so I would rather not put myself through the pain of taking such a course if I really do not need to. This is also because if I do need to take calculus, I will also have to take it during the school year along with pre-calculus as well, which will be stressful
:(. However, if I do take it and happen to get a low mark, will UBC see it? In addition, does UBC only look at the courses we submit, or do they also look at our in-school GPA, because if this was the case, I will need to take out some of my academic courses (which I have a lot of so I could choose between a wide range of marks for admission next year) and replace them with easy courses, such as yearbook.
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Hi! Then I recommend you take Calculus if the field you're going into emphasizes it e.g Engineering, Computer Science - LARGELY math-based programs; Calculus would prepare you and make the transition from high school to university math very easy, but Pre-Calculus 12 tends to be the most important course: it's the foundation for post-secondary math. I took Pre-Calc 12 because I was going into the Health Sciences (and it was also a required pre-requisite).

UBC will see your Calculus mark only if you use it for calculating your admissions average (top 4 courses you submit, not your overall in-school GPA). Calculus is an approved Grade 12 course, while most UBC programs list Pre-Calculus 12 as the required pre-requisite, so you're set (:
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Would taking UBC's summer scholar's program for high school students help me get a grasp on the applied and environmental sciences taught in university? Or is it a waste of money? Do you think attending will look impressive on my application?
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I think it's a great opportunity! I personally didn't participate in it, but the program lets you see how university life in a field of study is! The lab/lecture/field work you do gives you a taste, and you'll know what to expect and how to cope, especially within the Applied and Environmental Sciences e.g. heavy course loads, demands and how much time you must dedicate. Once you get the most out of the program, I'm sure you'll no longer be as overwhelmed when you start as a first year student!

Including it on your application should be able to at least show UBC you are serious - makes your application diverse (:
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What kind of average/GPA would I need to have for UBC Arts second year transfer?
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I believe there's set competitive averages for post-secondary transfer students - UBC Arts is a typical 3.1~3.3 (B-B+) GPA/average based on your most recent transferable credits. (:
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Thank you for being patient everyone! I'll be answering each inquiry asap (:
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Would you recommend taking any grade 12 sciences online? I heard that online courses are easier than in-school ones and would like to take maybe physics in the summer. Also, I would like to take mandarin 12 online as well, but since mandarin is my native language, will UBC allow me to submit this mark as one of my four courses?
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If you think you can handle them, then go ahead. Summer science courses often consist of heavy material condensed into two months when you normally learn the concepts over more than two months (a typical school year), but it's personal preference!

And yes they can. UBC also considers online courses. Mandarin 12 is an approved Grade 12 course. If you want to include Mandarin 12 in calculating your admissions average you should have the course completed by February 1. Don't forget - ensure your online school forwards your mark to the Ministry of Education so that it can appear on your transcript before self-reporting!
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Hi I have about 93% average and many ECs such as playing soccer, coaching it and refereeing it, leadership for 3 years at school, lots of volunteering in Canadian Cancer Society and teen mentoring, etc. I was wondering what you think my chances are for sciences?? please reply I have been freaking out!
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93%~ is roughly above the cut-off (which is 92; sometimes it fluctuates a tad) for Sciences. I'd say you have a good chance; remember your PP is also weighted. And your ECs sound great as well. You may want to add more ECs that can possibly pit you against the rest and distinguish your application - UBC Science is very competitive! This way, if spots are given up then you can also be squeezed in. Don't worry (: I know how stressful and nerve-wracking the admissions season is, but staying calm will help! What other ECs do you have?

Feel free to read through the thread for PP/EC pointers in my replies.
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With a 91.25% average (Pre-cal, Adv English, Adv Biology, Global History) what do you think my chances are for acceptance to general science? EC's include co chair of social justice group at my school, student government and news team chair, volunteer hours at hospital, part time job, soccer and rugby. :/
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91.25~ average: sturdy yet borderline (UBC Sciences cut-off is approx. 92~ and above). Science is one of the most competitive out of all UBC faculties, with the highest amount of prospective students - both domestic and international - trying to snag a spot!

I'm not saying you won't get admitted at all. UBC admissions are unpredictable, but with those ECs, you may slither your way in, especially when some begin to decline their offers. Again, your PP and ECs must exude your best abilities and unique skills. Talk about why or how you approached your ECs. Applicants with interesting, original profiles catch UBC's eye and give them a significant advantage over others. (:

You also still have considerable time to boost your average (if you haven't self-reported). All the best!
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Any advice on how to build a personal profile?
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Hello! You can scroll through the thread (: I've already disclosed helpful tips and pointers. You're free to ask me specific questions if you want.
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Should I expect a huge change in the amount of work and effort needed to be put into school from grade 12 to university? How would you generally describe first year (ie. hectic, fun, stressful, etc.).
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Thanks for the question!

There's definitely a huge shift from Grade 12 to university. No one keeps track of your class attendance, hounds you down for assignments you didn't submit, tests you skipped or exams you missed, and no one throws you in detention. The time you have is ALL yours. You are 100% responsible for your own studies and must have initiative if you expect to succeed. Sounds like a real pain in the ass (and it is), but you'll assimilate into the system quickly, I'm sure! University is really just a matter of being time-smart. If you master this, you can master anything; it's always the /intense/ course load and full-fledged independence (your mom no longer pesters you to do your homework, make your bed and wake up for school) that scares first years, and believe me, I nearly cried when I was in your shoes.

Good, efficient study habits are your saving grace once you begin adjusting to university life. Try your best to be ahead of your readings and homework, and set a daily study routine every week! Put aside time.

Don't be discouraged, though. We're all in the same boat (or used to be); your first year experience depends on you! It was no doubt stressful for me, but at the same time I had TONS of fun. Meeting new friends with common interests, going to parties/raves, exploring the UBC campus and its beautiful locations and socializing as much as I can made me love first year. These plus becoming a legal adult were sure benefits (; It's subjective for each person.

If you want to have a great first post-secondary year, I can say that you should study hard, work hard and play hard.
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I heard it's easier to transfer into UBC Arts third-year versus second-year. Is that true? Thanks!
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It's easier to transfer into third year due to people declaring majors/wanting to specialize. In third year, specific pre-requisites should all have been met in first and second year, therefore the competition decreases by a landslide, and since some consider UBC Arts an "easy" faculty, then this is the reason. In second year you're still completing pre-requisite courses that you must have if you intend to specialize, enter the program you want for third year, and get your major degree when you graduate.

I plan to finish my pre-requisites before I apply to UBC Med School and Nursing School for my third year.
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I want to go into science or business at UBC. However, I always hear about how professors assign extremely long essays. My problem is that my essays are never extremely well-structured and all throughout high school, I've depended on easy teachers to give me good marks because no one has ever truly taught me how to write a good essay. Even though I'm not going after an English degree or anything of the sort, should I be worried about this? Do professors mark hard on essays?
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Hello! I apologize for the late reply - been a hectic couple of days for me!

University essays are generally long, and this spans all post-secondary institutions, not just UBC.

In the words of some professors I've had, university essays are something of a thorn in the backside: students should be capable of writing essays at a specific post-secondary standard (UBC English 112 puts you into the thick of introductory academic writing and style) and are marked according their proper ability to fulfill this. So although you won't be specializing in English/writing-heavy fields, you're still expected to reach the post-secondary standard of writing.

There's numerous workshops and extra help available to you! With sufficient practice, you'll soon become a natural. You don't have to be an excellent writer to create an excellent essay. It's all about the quality, how concise you are, and how well you can convey your point.
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