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A Serious Question Please Help :)

A photo of sarawrz sarawrz
I want to get into a business program but I don't have calculus and was considering taking it in the summer school should I just take it in nightschool or apply to universities with my data management and advanced functions and if so do you know of the universities that would accept data and advanced the ones I currenly know are York and Mcmaster. I was considering UTM but calculus is reccommended. I know I will have an average in the eighties. To be honest I am not the greatest at math. Only got a 74 in advanced and think i will probably get a 80 in data. the rest of my marks will be in the 90 range. Any tips or suggestions would be helpful thanks for reading.:colors:
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A photo of Nick0rz Nick0rz
Take calculus in 2nd semester, or in night school, or go to Ryerson who doesn't require calculus.

Also, FYI, data isn't real math.
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A photo of HelloMeikaKitty HelloMeikaKitty
you can also take online calculus:compress:

BTW: obviously people that are not majoring in business would not know that ANY successful business uses statistical methods that are learned in data. Data is a good math course to take, that will boost your mark
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A photo of Nick0rz Nick0rz

@HelloMeikaKitty wrote
you can also take online calculus:compress:

BTW: obviously people that are not majoring in business would not know that ANY successful business uses statistical methods that are learned in data. Data is a good math course to take, that will boost your mark


Saying I'm not a business major is just flat out wrong. Learn that a BBA is a f-ucking business major.

Of course businesses use statistical and other forms of mathematical analysis are quite prevalent. Things like stochastic calculus, loss models, Monte Carlo methods, etc are incredibly common. Data gives you an incredibly basic over view of simple probability, which will be covered in the first month of your university statistic course. I think calling it a mark booster brings back into question whether it is a real math course.
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A photo of Toronto12 Toronto12
I would have to say that most good business programs will require a decent grade in calculus and advanced function and will most likely require 2-4 mandatory math university courses (Uoft, Waterloo, McMas, York etc). If you intend to take math courses outside of normal school due to grade issues, I strongly disagree with your choice. Think logically; if you could not handle your school's math, what makes you think that you can excel at university level math courses? (I'm not saying that you won't or will never and you probably can but probability of that is very rare).

Here are two possible scenarios that you may encounter at university;

1) You may find that the university math courses are easy and very much of a review at the beginning of the term which is true. However this underestimation behavior will lead to poor study habits and eventually potentially screw you over when you face midterms or finals.

2) Assuming that you took a night school or a private school course for calculus or any math courses. However in this case, the university course is extremely difficult and many concepts, applications and theories were not taught or completely new to you despite the professor insisting that it is review. At this moment, you probably regret that you took easy courses and will find yourself in a very difficult situation.

The above situations are very true and through my years at university, I have personally known people that were in either situations. They end up wasting their tuition money, retaking courses and obtaining bad grades which ultimately affects their gpa.

So here's my advice;

Endure something that is hard and challenging which may result in lower grade average.
But obtain growth, work ethics and skill that will ultimately lead you to success in the long term.

Aim for the highest so when you fall you don't fall to the lowest.
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A photo of sarawrz sarawrz
Thanks for the advice guys I'll take calculus next semester. I see what you mean I guess it's better to take it in highschool when it's free then to take it in university and possibly fail it while im paying for it. Honestly i took advanced last year and was slacking so i didn't prepare much and now I really regret it. I was wondering what is the difference between a bcomm and bba/ba?
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A photo of Nick0rz Nick0rz

@sarawrz wrote
Thanks for the advice guys I'll take calculus next semester. I see what you mean I guess it's better to take it in highschool when it's free then to take it in university and possibly fail it while im paying for it. Honestly i took advanced last year and was slacking so i didn't prepare much and now I really regret it. I was wondering what is the difference between a bcomm and bba/ba?


Bcomm and BBA are essentially the same, as in they are both a form of business degree. A BA is a bachelor of arts, and thus you don't have the same focus on business. The only BA you want if you're going into business is the HBA from Ivey, or an Ivy League arts degree.
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A photo of DayOnBay DayOnBay
Most business programs in Canada require calculus as a pre-requisite for admissions. If you are looking to go into fields such as finance, it is almost mandatory to have rudimentary calculus knowledge.

It is also very likely that you will encounter a calculus course in your first year of business school, so taking it in high school will make it much easier in your post-secondary studies.
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A photo of LampShade LampShade
Data management will come in useful, especially in stats and linear algebra/probability! But I'd suggest taking calculus anyways because it might be too big of risk not to take as university exams are weighted a lot more... so no chance to screw up. My calc final was 80% of my mark. 90% linear algebra/probability final, so get as much practise as you can :)

that way ALL math for business can become a mark booster, cuz as long as you are prepared, you should be fine!
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