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acceptance for universities

A photo of jake123 jake123
am currently a grade 11 student in ontario, just finished my first semester here are my marks

FEF3U1 Extanded french - 96
MC3UIB 11 math IB - 88
SCH3UIB Chemistry IB - 90
SPH3U Physics - 80

Overall average of 89, but i have english this semester and may not get such a good mark in it (hopefully 80)

I want to apply for civil engineering next year at Queens, Carleton, western or McMaster
Are those gr 11 marks good enough for an acceptance? And which of these universities are good choices for engineering?
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A photo of ninetyfour ninetyfour
For early acceptance, your marks are probably okay for McMaster (although, there are people with 90+ averages who didn't get accepted first round, so I don't know what their system is). For Western, I believe they said they were looking for a grade 11 average in the 90's, so you may be okay, depending on how you do second semester. Queen's does not send out acceptances to Ontario students based on Grade 11 marks (to my knowledge), so work hard in Grade 12. I'm not sure about Carleton.

The curriculum for engineering is consistent across Canada, so you will be receiving the same education wherever. I suppose to difference may come in with if you want co-op or an internship, and where employers hire from. Also take into consideration the campus and city where you would be (probably) living and studying for the next 4/5 years.
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A photo of jake123 jake123
Thank you for your help. Im still trying to figure out if engineering is really what i wanna do. Ive heard that universities cut alot of their students after the first year, is that true?
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A photo of tellyvision tellyvision
i don't think it's that universities cut their students, it just that there's a high percentage of students that either fail during first year or dropout or even switch programs.
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A photo of abbyamu abbyamu

@jake123 wrote
Thank you for your help. Im still trying to figure out if engineering is really what i wanna do. Ive heard that universities cut alot of their students after the first year, is that true?



Universities don't usually "cut" a lot of students after first year. In fact, I believe the vast majority of people leave an engineering program by choice. This can be because of the academic workload, or just because of a lack of interest in the subject matter being taught. Often, people find a certain area of math or science that interests them more (like life science, physics, etc. - that have lighter schedules), and transfer into those. Other times, people even transfer between engineering majors. In a program where it is unlikely that you have had a lot of experience in much of what is being offered in high school, this is understandable.

Don't be discouraged by the transfer/"drop out" rates. I suggest you give engineering a try - it can't hurt. Because of the academic rigour of the programs, transferring into a science/math major is probably not extremely difficult if you decide you don't like it. And it is very rewarding if you do enjoy it :D
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A photo of chatmike chatmike

@jake123 wrote
Thank you for your help. Im still trying to figure out if engineering is really what i wanna do. Ive heard that universities cut alot of their students after the first year, is that true?



It depends which university you're talking about. Queens for example does not have a specific cut-off for second year other then passing (either 50% or 60%, not quite sure)so you can apply to any stream regardless of your mark as long as its above the required average.

Schools like Mcmaster for example have a 40% drop out rate. We had something like 1300-1400 first year engineers in september, now we're close to 1000, and by april it will drop another few hundred for sure. Why? Well firstly, your average needs to be >60% to continue to second year, then you face competition for second year programs where you need a specific average for a specific program.
Then if you consider how many people actually graduate only being in the few hundreds, you're left with pretty depressing numbers that only a small percent of people actually graduate.

However, other things to consider is that you don't know what the frack you want to do in high school, and the more you go into university, the more you figure out what you want to do. And considering a very large chunk of engineers want to be an engineer because "it makes a lot of money and my parents want me to be one" you do some growing up when you're on your own and maybe realize maybe you want to switch into life science, or commerce, etc. So really, the drop out numbers really aren't that surprising.

If you really want to be an engineer, and you know what an engineer does, and you enjoy math and physics, and you're determined, then you'll be fine and there is nothing to worry about. And if you second guess yourself in first year, who cares? If you find a program you enjoy even more, then that's an even greater win!
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