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AMA: Brock BAcc Graduate, Carleton MAcc Graduate, Big 4 Employee

My name is Neal, and I graduated from Brock's Bachelor of Accounting Co-op program in 2016 and Carleton's Master of Accounting program in 2017. I was a yconic Student Ambassador for 2016-17. Although I work full-time at PwC now, I'm still around answering questions about accounting as a career and universities. 

My co-op work experience includes:
-Corporate Accounting, Henkel (Germany)
-Assurance and Tax, Collins Barrow
-Risk Assurance, Ernst and Young

I currently work at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Assurance. . 

A snapshot of my time at Brock:  
-Served as an executive for several clubs  
-Participated in numerous internal/external case competitions and conferences  
-Served as a Tutorial Leader for Brock's first-year Macroeconomics course  
-Inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma (the top 10% of Goodman get invited)  
-Did co-ops and internships with 3 different companies in corporate accounting, assurance, tax and risk assurance located in Germany and Canada  
-Participated in a short-term exchange to France  
-Volunteered for the business school's Career Services office, where I critiqued students' resumes  
-Lived in residence (first-year) and off campus

A snapshot of my time at Carleton:  
-President of the Sprott MAcc Society  

Feel free to ask me questions below! Or you can add me on LinkedIn if you'd like to send a private message (https://www.linkedin.com/in/nsengupta).
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I'm only in gr 11 right now but am interested in accounting. Being an athlete I am not able to stay around school and be on clubs and join school things. I have done my volunteer hours but nothing excessive like other students. Given that my training and sport take me away from a lot of this, will schools overlook me because I don't have a ton of ECs? Thank you for your input.
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For any supplementary applications, remember that quality overrides quantity. I'd argue that sports/athletics are a solid extracurricular to have. I'm not 100% sure about university recruiters, but I know that accounting recruiters love to see any type of athletic activity. 

Make sure  you indicate how much of a time commitment you've put into training and emphasize the transferable skills that sports give you (teamwork skills, communication skills, critical thinking skills, the ability to adapt to rapidly changing environments, etc.). Specific examples of when you've used any of these transferable skills will also strengthen your application. 

Quick note - I'd avoid |watering down" your involvement with sports on your application (e.g. "I know I don't have a ton of club experience, but I'm involved in a lot of sports"). 

Lastly, many accounting programs such as the Brock BAcc and the McMaster BCom do not require supplementary applications. Let me know if you have further questions about Brock's program! 
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Gr. 11 here...Thank you Neal, that was very helpful.
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What's the advantage of doing a Macc at Carleton? instead of just doing an undegrad + CPA like everyone else.
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Good question! 

After you complete your undergraduate degree, there are two main pathways to the Common Final Exam (CFE): independent modules (I've heard this path takes as many as 2-3 years for people who started their undergrads after 2014) and masters programs (Carleton's MAcc is over 2 summers, and you are expected to work from the September to April period in between, so you have the opportunity to chip away at the 30-month experience requirement).

I chose doing a masters for a few other reasons:
-I enjoyed university, and I saw this as a way to elongate my university experience.
-You learn from professors, instead of teaching yourself through modules.
-The modules require you to study part-time on weekends/after work on evenings. I don't have the motivation to study after work. 
-I want to work in Europe in the near future. For some reasons, top employers there really value masters degrees.
-The module route costs about $12,000, and so the Big 4 (and most other larger firms) reimburses everyone who goes through the CPA process this amount. For just $6,000 out-of-pocket, I will get a masters degree in addition to my CPA.
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Why did you do MAcc at Carlton versus Brock? I swear Brock was as good as Waterloo...
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Brock's MAcc is pretty solid. I did a transcript assessment last November (basically, the graduate admissions team tells you whether or not you'd be a competitive applicant if you were to formally apply to the program) and I didn't really get a straight answer. They told me to request another transcript assessment in April 2016 once I had finished my last semester.

So I decided to hedge my bets and apply to the Carleton MAcc - which had an application deadline in January 2016. I ended up getting in, so I went with Carleton.

Looking back, however, I personally think the Carleton MAcc is better for a few reasons:
-We use the case study approach to learning. The CFE is 100% cases. 
-We use SecurExam (the official CFE software) to write our evaluations. 
-In our first summer, we do a case class with an individual who marks the Day 3 CFE exam.
-In our second summer, we do another case class where we write cases and get them ripped to shreds thoroughly evaluated by someone who marks the Day 2 CFE exam. 
-In a nutshell, we learn exactly what we need to do to be successful when writing the CFE.
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What other masters program did you apply or you consider are good for accounting?
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The only MAcc I officially applied to was Carleton's program. I'd say Brock has a pretty solid MAcc as well. 

In Ontario, there are only two other MAcc's right now: Waterloo and York. Waterloo's MAcc is only open to those who did AFM, Math/CPA or Biotech/CPA. York requires you to do the GMAT/GRE if you are a non-York applicant. York's MAcc was also way more expensive than the other programs last year (about $30,000, but I heard they are dropping the price this year to make it more competitive with the other MAcc's).  

The MMPA at UTM is also an option. They have a few variations of their program (12/24/27 months depending on how in-depth your accounting degree is). If you're a non-UofT grad, you need to take the GMAT and the tuition looks pretty up there as well ($32,000). 

Based on this, Carleton and Brock seem like the best two options for me. But it all depends on where you did your undergrad. 
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So then Carleton and Brock are the only ones that don't require a written test GMAT/GRE? 
Would you say MBA accounting stream is a good option? I know Laurier and Mcmaster MBA don't require work experience.
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Can confirm, unless I'm mistaken Schulich's website is already reflecting updated MAcc tuition costs of around $20K for two terms. Should be a solid option going forward, especially for those looking to take advantage of Schulich OCR.
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Thanks Sasha, I feel like I might have read the Schulich thing on your AMA. 

Regarding MBAs, there are a few things:
-You have to get a decent enough score on your GMAT to get admission
-You need work experience (2 years for Laurier, 1 for McMaster)
-You can only do one MBA; what if your career plans change in the future and you'd like to do a regular MBA 10 years down the road?
-The Laurier MBA takes you right to the CFE, whereas with the McMaster MBA you need to do Capstones 1 and 2 on your own. Check out the "Download Now" document located here: https://www.cpacanada.ca/en/become-a-cpa/pathways-to-becoming-a-cpa/cpa-pep-admission-undergraduate-degree-holders/cpa-accredited-programs-at-psis/

Personally, I'm not sure an MBA is the best route... but if you are interested in doing that, Laurier's MBA seems like the best  choice. Per the document that I've linked to, a bunch of universities have Post-Graduate Diploma Programs which also take you to Capstone 1. These might also be something to look at. 
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How was your experience at Brock?
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tl;dr
-Solid co-op: direct entry and likely counts toward the 30-month experience requirement
-Manageable tuition
-Good extracurricular offerings - they build your skillset, fill your resume, and allow you to stand out in front of employers
-Bad: some questionable professors and not everyone who wants a Big 4 co-op gets one

Brock was amazing, I wouldn't want to trade my Brock experience for any other university. 

As a mid-sized university, I never really felt lost or just another "student number". Goodman is also pretty small and tight-knit, so you get to know other business and accounting students. I've never been screwed over by another student (and I don't know anyone else that has) - so that culture of screwing other students over to get ahead isn't as prevalent at Brock.

The co-op experience is pretty solid. If you're admitted to the co-op program from high school, you don't need to re-apply/interview for a spot after first year. And you get to chip away at the 30-month work experience requirements as an undergraduate student. Also, the ROI is great since tuition isn't as high as some other universities. 

The best part about Goodman, in my opinion, are the extracurricular activities. There is a wide range of them you can get involved in, and they boost your resume. You also meet a lot of like-minded and goal-oriented students who become your friends. You build skill sets that you will eventually use on the job and you stand-out to employers. 

On the downside, there are some questionable professors who don't take their jobs seriously (but what university doesn't have that?) and while we do place quite a few people in the Big 4 for co-op, there are inevitably some disappointed people every year (I'm sure the same happens at other universities too). 
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I heard there's a new EY tower being built that finishes in summer of 2017. Is the current EY location at TD centre going to close when the new EY building is built?

Also, are you in tax, audit, or advisory? What industry are you working in and if you are in audit, can you give some information on how much traveling you do for clients?

Thanks!
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Yeah, well done with all that knowledge! The move-in date is actually mid-April 2017. We will be moving out of our TD Centre location permanently - and thank goodness, our part of the tower is in desperate need of a renovation! :)  

Up until April 2017, I will be working in Advisory. Within Advisory, there are two groups in which you can get CPA hours: Financial Services Risk Management (FSRM) and Risk Assurance. I'm in Risk Assurance, and right now I'm focusing in on Technology Audit.

I work within the FSO group (Financial Services Office) where our clients include banks, insurance companies and smaller financial service organizations. For as long as I've been at EY, I've worked on one mammoth client who is based in Toronto, so the furthest I've traveled for work is a few subway stops away. :)

FSO is not ideal for travel since most of our clients are located within the GTA. If you're looking to get into Audit and you want to travel, try to avoid Financial Services!  [Note - EY Toronto slots new hires into groups however they see fit, so you won't have any control over where you'll end up at first.] That being said, regular short-term secondment opportunities (mostly to the US) come up once you hit the senior level. And you can do longer-term secondments as well. 
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Hi Neal,

Thanks for making this thread! I am a second year in the BAcc program at Brock and have my first Co-op term at Big 4 Audit in Toronto starting January. I heard the busy season gets really streasful with the long hours. Can you just give me some insight on what its like and what to expect? Can you also tell me how to make the best possible performance there and what a typical day would be like starting off? Additionally, If there's any other helpful information you'd like to add than please do so! Thanks
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Congratulations on landing a co-op placement at a Big 4 in Toronto! 

Things can get pretty stressful during busy season, and I'm not sure if you can really prepare for it - you just have to roll with the punches. Take advantage of the training your firm will provide you in your first week. You'll be matched a mentor, who will be a great source for asking questions to. Hours can be crazy - but chances are no one will "make" you work them. It's on you to decide when/if you want to work more than the minimum amount of required hours. 

I wouldn't say there is a typical day. What you will be doing depends a lot on who your clients are (small/medium/large), what industry you are working in (Financial Services vs. Energy vs. Hospitality), and who big your team is. Chances are you will be doing a lot of audit testing - this will probably be done in Excel.

Some tips for you...
-Always, always, always ask questions. If you are confused about anything, it's best to ask your Senior (and have them explain it in a few minutes) rather than it is to spend hours on something trying to figure it out.
-Remember that this is your first co-op placement, and your team will know this. If things don't come easy to you, don't get disappointed.
-One thing that I do when things are really, really, really busy is send my direct Senior/Manager daily updates via email (what I have accomplished, what is still remaining, where I am having difficulties). They will appreciate this because they do want to check in with you, but likely won't have the time to. Transparency is key! 
-Go to all the firm events (socials, non-mandatory training, etc.) that you can. Unfortunately, networking doesn't end when you land a job - get to know as many people at your firm as you can!
-If you're at EY and want to connect at any point, don't hesitate to hit me up on Skype For Business :)
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Did you do any Co-op terms at EY through Brock befote getting hired full time? If so, how many? 

Also, the firms you do co-op terms with will keep calling you back for the rest of the co-op terms right? I just wanted to know when they call you back for rest of your coop terms, do you get a new offer letter and stuff again or is it just like a continuation type of thing?
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I did one 4-month co-op at EY during my last year.

Chances are firms will keep calling you back for the rest of your co-op terms - unless you get removed from your program, switch majors or do a bad job at work. If you're called back, you have to sign a new contract (since each co-op contract has a specified end date).  There's no guarantee that your co-op employer will hire you on full-time though. 
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Okay cool thanks. So before you did your 4 month term at EY, did you do your previous co-op terms at at a smaller firm/Non-Big 4? How was the switch into EY in terms of work/life balance and environment?
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No worries. Prior to EY, I did my first two co-op terms in industry, and two other co-op terms at a mid-sized accounting firm.


In comparison to the mid-sized firm...

-The social atmosphere was a bit nicer at the mid-sized firm, since everyone knew everyone. In EY Toronto, our tower probably has hundreds (if not thousands) of employees, so people tend to be a bit more reserved - no one really says "hi" to one another. Doesn't bother me though.

-There's a lot more social events at EY though - townhalls, post-townhall socials, counselling family team building events.

-Busy season at the mid-sized firm was hectic.... we worked a lot of hours, which arguably were comparable to what I work at EY (maybe a bit less). The only difference is, at the mid-sized firm I had many different clients to work on whereas at EY, I'm working on one giant client.

-In short, the switch wasn't too bad (in terms of "busy season hours").

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hey neal, it's my dream to have a career with a lot of travel opportunities. are there a lot of accounting jobs available to us that heavily involve business trips? like you, i love exploring the world!!

i was also wondering if you applied to waterloo for your undergrad. do you know the pros and cons of waterloo and brock compared to each other?
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 Hi Jo,


In my opinion, accounting is great field to travel - there are not only opportunities to travel while working at your home office (different clients can be in different locations), but there are also opportunities to do short-term (a few months to a year) and long-term (more than one year) secondments abroad. Also, the CPA designation is internationally recognized so after writing a few local certification exams in places like the UK, Australia and parts of the US, I believe you can freely practice in those places.


I can't comment too much on Waterloo as I don't know a lot about the school. Both Brock and Waterloo seem to be pretty similar at this point in time: both have established co-op programs which all Big 4 firms hire from, they are both CPA accredited, and they both have post-graduate diplomas/Master of Accounting programs. The two main differences are tuition (look into tuition after first year at both schools) and the fact that some people may favour Waterloo's program since it's been around a bit longer.


Personally, I loved the environment at Brock. There was the opportunity to get involved with different competitions/clubs within the business school, and in general people were really outgoing and friendly.

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thanks for the detailed response! another worry i've been having is the impending automation of a lot of what accountants do; i know this mostly applies to entry-level and bookkeeping jobs, but i've seen articles that say even auditors can be replaced by machines. how much cause do you think there is for concern? do you think the job market will contract in the years to come?
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Hi Jo,


I don't think automation will be a major blow to the audit profession. On the flipside, I think that the automation that occurs within our clients' operations will create a larger demand for auditors. As auditors, we are around to ensure that our clients are following pre-determined rules. Because the business world has gotten so complex, there are more rules to follow. And because there are more rules to follow, more audits must be conducted.


Within audit, the human element cannot be replaced by automated procedures, because - at the end of the day - we can't place 100% reliance on automated procedures. Humans are needed to check computer-generated work to ensure it is correct.


I also read somewhere that the demand for auditors will grow 11% in the next 10 years. So I wouldn't worry too much about automation! :)


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I completely agree, the importance of professional judgement and skepticism has made the industry more than just about counting beans. The value added for having experienced professionals also makes auditors/advisors very valuable versus just computer programs.
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Check out my first blog post as a yconic Digital Brand Ambassador - it's about study tips for accounting exams!


https://yconic.com/discussion/my-top-5-tips-for-crushing-your-accounting-final/Ydrnkgd1iH4pTLFBktr7sXvEES7MeoWy

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Any reason why you didn't consider doing the McGill GCPA program as opposed to Carleton?
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I'm from Ontario, and I was a bit weary of going out-of-province to do any post-undergraduate CPA preparation. I know the CFE is a national set of exams (and the GCPA program gets you to the CFE), but I was still apprehensive.


Also, I want to potentially go into part-time lecturing - I need a masters degree for this. 


Looking into it though, it looks like the GCPA program is only for public accounting - you can't focus on finance or performance management with it.

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Hi Neal,

I'm currently in the Brock's Bacc program and I'm thinking about the masters in a few years. I know the minimum admission requirements say 75 in major accounting courses but do you know what a reasonable cutoff actually is? I'm a little worried because my ACTG courses are only slightly above the 75 stated on the website.  

Thanks!
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Hi Roselyn,


I just logged into my Goodman Portal and the message from the Grad Admissions Team regarding my transcript pre-assessment was still there: "Currently the average accounting average for students admitted for January 2016 is 83.13%."


Various universities (including Brock, McMaster, Guelph and others) also have Post-Graduate Diploma Programs that will let you skip various modules/electives. So that is another option! And worst comes to worst, the module route is decent as well - most people go this route, and firms (I assume) should be really accommodating to study needs.

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do u think ill get in with an 85 average (coop)
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You might be cutting it a bit tight...
"Expected cut-off: mid 80s; Co-op high 80s"
https://brocku.ca/programs/undergraduate/accounting/
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Personally know people who have been rejected with an 86, but also know people who have gotten in with below 85. Process seems to get a bit random, definitely try to raise your average by a couple % to be safe
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^The cutoff differs every year, and the sole admission factor is grades. Your friends that got in with below an 85% were probably admitted in a year that wasn't too competitive.
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Hi Neal,
Thank you for making this thread!  I'm in high school and seriously considering going into accounting; do you have any advice on what high schoolers like me can do now to help prepare and gain some insight on becoming an accountant?

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Hi J Y, 

 Are you in Grade 11? If so, see if you can sign-up for a co-op term next year at an accounting firm. You might want to also see if a guidance counselor might be able to arrange for you to job-shadow an accountant for an afternoon. 

 As is mentioned on here pretty frequently, high school "accounting" is different from university accounting. So getting out into the field and seeing how it is in person is probably the best way to get insight :)
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I recommend creating a linkedin account and network with professionals at Big 4, cold emailing recruiters is good if you are a graduating student. You will be surprised the amount of power you have as a high school student as you will definitely impress them with your attitude to get ahead of the curve.
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Thank you for both of your guys' help!  I'm in grade 12 however.  I've already done a bit of networking and reaching out and such, so I guess I'm on the right track. :)
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Hi! Do you know if I'd be able to get into Brock Accounting with Co-op with an 83% average? Or even BBA? Also, are there specific mark requirements for prerequisite marks?
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Hello! So the expected cutoff for BAcc Co-op is a high-80 whereas regular BAcc's expected cutoff is a mid-80: 
https://brocku.ca/programs/undergraduate/accounting/

The expected cutoff for BBA Co-op is a low-80 whereas regular BBA's expected cutoff is a high-70: 
https://brocku.ca/programs/undergraduate/business-administration/

That being said, everything relies on how competitive other students are - the cutoff grades change depending on the strength of applicants. Definitely apply for the co-op options of each program since if you do not get in, you are automatically considered for the non co-op option. 

I'm not sure if there are specific mark requirements for prerequisite courses (I don't think so as long as you make the cutoff average) - but a quick email to 101apps@brocku.ca can help!

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hey neal, thanks for answering my previous questions with such detail!! lately another issue has been on my mind, which is networking. i can hold a conversation, but i'm not excellent or memorable in any way, especially on a first impression. i also get exhausted after talking to people for >2 hours straight. given how important networking is for accounting, do you think i could build a good network/relationship with recruiters despite this?
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Hi Jo,

Networking is pretty important for accounting. If you end up in the BAcc Co-op program at Brock, you will do your first co-op term in the Winter Semester of your second year. This means that recruiting occurs in the Fall Semester of your second year, and there is a big networking session that Goodman hosts called "CPA Day." 

CPA Day is 2-hours of full-on networking with all accounting firms (Big 4, mid-sized firms, regional firms). In anticipation of CPA Day, firms will host things like office visits, coffee connects, on-campus events, etc. during your first year (and the summer after first year). It's absolutely imperative to attend as many of these as you can so that you build a good rapport with each firm's recruiting team. In fact, if you are targeting the Big 4 and meeting the firm's recruiters for the first time at CPA Day, you're way behind!

Getting to your question, you'd be surprised how little it takes to be memorable to a recruiter! You don't need to have climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro, won a Nobel Peace Prize and cured cancer to necessarily stand out :) First, a LOT of your peers will be nervous at CPA Day (that's why attending office visits and coffee connects is good - you meet recruiters in a much more casual setting and there's fewer people usually so it's a better opportunity to connect with recruiters 1-1). So, just being articulate, having enthusiasm, smiling, and not asking generic questions can make you memorable. 

Second, you can be memorable if you share a commonality with a firm representative (e.g. you both visited NYC over the summer, you both love a certain TV show, you both have corgis). As long as you can hold a conversation (which admittedly is difficult when there's 10 students in a semi-circle around 1 recruiter), you should be fine!
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thank you for reassuring me a little. however, the recruiter/student ratio does kind of unnerve me - at these networking events, wouldn't all the students be fighting with each other for a chance to be heard? it seems like a stressful situation.
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Not going to sugarcoat it - it is pretty stressful because of the recruiter-to-student ratios. 

It's an art - you have to make yourself heard (so you can't be quiet). But you cannot be overbearing (so you can't be too loud either). That's why the summer office visits, coffee connects, and other pre-CPA Day events help unnerve/prepare you. Your Co-op Office will also train you, and if you end up at Brock, the Goodman Career Office can also assist. There are on-campus resources!
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Hi Neal,

I've heard many things about Big 4 busy season of work (between January to April time) ranging from working 60 hours to 80 hours a week. Can you let me know how it is during this time and how many hours you have to work? Also, which time between January to April does it get the most hectic?
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Hello,


Busy season really depends on your service line:

-Assurance is roughly from December to March

-Tax is roughly from late January to April

-Risk Assurance  is roughly September to January


I'm working in Risk Assurance until April 2017, and I work about 55 hours per week during busy season. How busy you are (and when you are busiest) really depends on the nature of your clients (and how many clients you are handling). I'm working on one large client, and we are busiest from late October to early February.


I've heard people in Assurance and Tax work way more hours than people in Risk Assurance (which is where the 60-80 hours you specified probably came from).

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Hey there :) My ultimate goal is to become a CPA but unfortunately I don't have  a high enough average to get into BAcc co-op. (I might be able to get into regular BAcc but I'd rather go into a co-op program). 
Do you think it'll be okay if I go into BBA Co-op?
 I know that it won't have all of the cpa accredited courses like it does in BAcc but how much more difficulty/time/work would it take to become a CPA if I take BBA co-op?
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Oh hi! 

So this is a bit of a complex question - bear with me! To acquire admission into CPA Canada's PEP (Professional Education Program), you need the following courses: http://www.cpaontario.ca/Students/PreReqEdu/1014page19508.pdf

As a BBA Co-op student concentrating in Accounting, you will do the following courses:
https://brocku.ca/webfm_send/40282

This means that you will be missing: ACTG 3P33, ACTG 4P34, ACTG 3P41, ACTG 4P41 and ACTG 4P42. You will also be missing ACTG 1P11 and ACTG 1P12, but these are equivalent to ACTG 1P91 and ACTG 2P12 (Check with CPA Ontario or a Goodman Academic Advisor to see if CPA will actually accept ACTG 1P91/ACTG 2P12 in lieu of 1P11/1P12 - I'm not sure of this). 

The kicker is that the 5 first missing courses that I mentioned are extremely hard to get into for BBA students because of the vast number of BAcc students who get priority for registering into them. If the stars don't align in your favour, you might have to ultimately do these classes at another university (such as Athabasca)... and then you'll have to deal with the mess of CPA Ontario assessing you with transcripts from multiple university. 

HOWEVER....

You will NOT have the prerequisite courses to get into Brock's Master of Accounting program - Brock's MAcc requires the completion of the legacy CA 51 credit hours, which are ONLY offered in the BAcc program. BUT... you CAN get into several Post-Graduate Accounting Diploma programs as well as Carleton University's MAcc. 

Another thing - the BBA kids have access to different co-op jobs than the BAcc kids via Brock's Co-op Portal. While you can definitely apply for CPA-streamed roles at the Big 4 external to the co-op job board, I'm not sure how many accounting opportunities you'd actually have.

One option is to study hard in your first year or two, then transfer into the BAcc program. I believe you need a 75% major average minimum for this. Another user on here, Sasha, has done this before. Sasha has an AMA as well - post your question there too if you want to know more about transferring from BBA to BAcc!

Haha to answer your question, do I think it's okay for you to go into BBA Co-op? Possibly! I think you'd have a much easier time doing the non co-op BAcc program and fighting to get a summer internship. And a lot less stress. If you're thinking Brock and you're thinking you want to pursue your CPA, I would say go for BAcc non co-op. 
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I should also mention: touch base with CPA Ontario AND the Goodman Academic Advisors about the intricacies of enrolling into the PEP program as a Brock BBA grad. They are way more knowledgeable on this than I am.
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Hey Neal just a few quick questions,

When would acceptances for Brock's co-op Bacc begin? How hard is it to get a Big 4 co-op placement? What does it take marks and networking wise to get a Big 4 placement?
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Hi Anonymous,


I'm not really sure when acceptances begin, but I received mine in late February. For a Big 4 co-op placement, networking is key. You have to attend as many events that the Big 4 host/sponsor (on-campus, onsite, at competitions/conferences) as you can. The number of people who get Big 4 placements vary annually, but I can tell you that not everyone who wants a Big 4 placement gets one - you really have to strategize/work for it.


Marks-wise, I would say an 80%+ average would be sufficient, as long as you have no negative outliers (e.g. 90s in all your classes, but a 60 in a key accounting class). If you do significantly better in your non-accounting classes than your accounting classes, this may also hurt your chances.


That being said, I've seen people with less-than-stellar grades get Big 4 placements - but they're the ones who are good speakers/networkers.

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Does networking first year even matter? Unless you really stand out, nobody is going to remember a first year student right?
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Networking is really important, no matter what year you are in. The key is finding a way to stand-out and casually finding a way to state it to recruiters. Mine was that I like to travel and I've been to XX countries - so I found ways to steer the conversation to travel ("Been anywhere fun over the summer?") and casually slipped it in.
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Would you have any idea as to how many people get accepted into co-op and how many people get accepted into non-coop. I know that numbers change depending on the applicant group but just a range would be sufficient. Thanks in advance Neal!!
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Hi Anonymous, 

Like you said, numbers can vary quite a bit depending on the year! 

Are you talking about BAcc? I think there are about 150-200 BAcc Co-op students and maybe 100-150 regular BAcc students accepted. 

Goodman-wide (BAcc, BBA, Dual Degree), almost 700 people are accepted each year. I would say about half of them are in co-op streams (Dual Degree is co-op only). 
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Yes I did mean for Goodman, sorry for the confusion. Thanks a bunch!
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Of the 150-200 co-op students accepted, how many do you think would graduate??
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Hi Anonymous,

Actually maybe there's 125-150 co-op students accepted into the BAcc program. I really have no idea how many truly make it through. I graduated with 100 people - some were co-op, some weren't. Ask the Admissions team at Goodman if you want a more accurate answer!
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To get inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma what would your average have to be?
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Hi Anonymous,

Induction into BGS is based on your overall average, not your major average. I got in with an 84% overall average and I'm pretty sure I was at the tail-end of the top 10% :) 
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I've been told by the BGS person that the minimum varies from 82-84 depending on the year and how everyone performs, so an 84 should definitely get you in.
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