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Applied Mathematics??

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Does anyone have any idea about...

What are some of the best universities that offer Applied Mathematics? And what specific career(s) does applied math lead into?

Thanks in advance for any help:scratch:
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A photo of x711Li x711Li
Define applied mathematics. The practicality of applied mathematics is dependent on what you're focusing on. (the applied mathematics of basket-weaving?)
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@x711Li wrote
Define applied mathematics. The practicality of applied mathematics is dependent on what you're focusing on. (the applied mathematics of basket-weaving?)



Seriously? Way to be a smart-ass. The program "Applied Mathematics" is perfectly well-defined.

The UW undergrad course calendar has a nice, general description here:

http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/MATH-Applied-Mathematics-Overview-1

The applied mathematics degree is generally a more theoretical version of a physics or engineering degree. You have a more rigorous mathematical background and a stronger understanding of the math you're working with. You'll also be working with more difficult math and more theoretical topics.

http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/MATH-Applied-Mathematics

You can see here your degree is pretty flexible, and allows you to take a lot of physics/engineering courses in addition to your pure math. Pretty easy to do a double major.

Waterloo has a good AMATH program, but I'm sure you could find other schools that have similarly good programs.
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@x711Li wrote
Define applied mathematics. The practicality of applied mathematics is dependent on what you're focusing on. (the applied mathematics of basket-weaving?)


I recommend The Applied Mathematics of Old Spice Commercials.
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A photo of x711Li x711Li

@greygoose wrote

@x711Li wrote
Define applied mathematics. The practicality of applied mathematics is dependent on what you're focusing on. (the applied mathematics of basket-weaving?)



Seriously? Way to be a smart-ass. The program "Applied Mathematics" is perfectly well-defined.

The UW undergrad course calendar has a nice, general description here:

http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/MATH-Applied-Mathematics-Overview-1

The applied mathematics degree is generally a more theoretical version of a physics or engineering degree. You have a more rigorous mathematical background and a stronger understanding of the math you're working with. You'll also be working with more difficult math and more theoretical topics.

http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/MATH-Applied-Mathematics

You can see here your degree is pretty flexible, and allows you to take a lot of physics/engineering courses in addition to your pure math. Pretty easy to do a double major.

Waterloo has a good AMATH program, but I'm sure you could find other schools that have similarly good programs.



Applied mathematics may be "perfectly well-defined" by University of Waterloo by their offered program, but it is by no means a universally defined term amongst post-secondary programs. Don't throw around words like "smartass" if you simply do not agree with someone.

Applied mathematics is a term you can use to refer to mathematics applied for business, physics and engineering. Keep in mind that the OP had no where specified Waterloo completely.

If you do have something to say to me specifically, you can PM me on the forums.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@x711Li wrote
Applied mathematics may be "perfectly well-defined" by University of Waterloo by their offered program, but it is by no means a universally defined term amongst post-secondary programs. Don't throw around words like "smartass" if you simply do not agree with someone.

Applied mathematics is a term you can use to refer to mathematics applied for business, physics and engineering. Keep in mind that the OP had no where specified Waterloo completely.

If you do have something to say to me specifically, you can PM me on the forums.



I can see you're very knowledgeable on the subject. You're provided so much information! A real expert! Thank you kindly.

The term "applied mathematics" in general refers to... mathematics that are applied. Each school will use the term differently to describe their programs, particularly when their math department is small, as they will then lump many programs under the umbrella of AMATH. I often refer to computer science as a form of applied mathematics, as well as any financial math program, and especially engineering. At the most general level, I would refer to applied math as the "doing" of math rather than the theory. But he was asking specifically about the program called "Applied Mathematics."

For instance, take a look at MIT: http://www-math.mit.edu/research/applied/

They have thrown combinatorics, bioinformatics, computer science, and numerical analysis/computational math under the umbrella. All of these fields have a distinct definition; there's not really any need to elaborate on them. But there is still "physical applied mathematics." Qualified with the word "physical" to distinguish it from the other AMATH programs, presumably. Well, what is that? It's what I described. Theoretical physics is lumped in there too, as I described.

Cornell does a similar thing, going further and including stats and some other interesting fields of math in there (game theory!). But always you will see something along the line of "mathematical physics" or "physical applied mathematics" in any AMATH department. The rest of these fields, computer science, combinatorics, etc. are distinct programs we would normally refer to by their specific field names, and yet there is still this field under AMATH referred to as "applied math." Well, what is *that*? It's what I have described.

As Waterloo has one of the largest and few math faculties on the continent, and has a separate department for pretty much every other program mentioned, I think it would be safe to stick with my definition. Of course, I am also assuming the OP has some modicum of googling ability and already knew all this. I'm disappointed you didn't give him that credit.

Regarding undergraduate program strength, these tend to be pretty constant no matter where you look, particularly in Canada. Certainly, look for schools with strong theoretical physics/engineering programs as well as strong mathematics programs in general if you're interested in the type of AMATH I described. Larger programs often also will indicate their strength when it comes to more specialized fields like math. Otherwise, if this isn't what you're interested in, research the individual program.
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Thank you all for your help. I find your answers informative, but rather entertaining:compress: . By the way, maybe I wasn't specific enough in my question, but I meant the actual program "Applied Mathematics." Thanks all anyways, this really helped :)
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A photo of greygoose greygoose
Glad to provide the info.

Regarding careers in the field (as I didn't really address this)... of course there are plenty of jobs in academia/teaching. There will definitely be research jobs if you're interested in grad school. You should also be qualified for some engineering-esque jobs, though you won't be a certified engineer.

I've heard that AMATH majors that focus more on the math will often do a lot of data analysis jobs.

And of course, your degree doesn't confine you to related work. Having a math degree is a very valuable thing as it demonstrates you can think critically.
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