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Are triple majors (math, physics, computer science) allowed at UofT?

A photo of Phase Phase
The major requirements for each program aren't many classes at all, and can be fit into one year. Since there is much overlap, would UofT allow a triple major in all of these? Normally I was planning to go for the double major (math/physics) but have been intrigued by computer science and its prospects as of late.

Thanks in advance.
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A photo of ktel ktel
Ask U of T?
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A photo of Phase Phase

@ktel wrote
Ask U of T?


No response from UofT as of yet, which is why I'm asking the question in the first place.
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A photo of HeroOfCanton HeroOfCanton
No, you can't. Only two of your POSts (programs of study) can be specalists or majors, and if you do two majors, then there has to be at least 12 unique full credits between them.

See: http://www.artsandscience.utoronto.ca/ofr/calendar/degree.htm
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A photo of ktel ktel
^ I suspected that much. A lot of the times even though the courses overlap, schools won't let you use all of your courses towards both majors.
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A photo of Phase Phase
Isn't computer science and physics specialist considered one joint specialist? In that case, wouldn't one joint specialist and one major be allowed?
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A photo of phylloconcrete phylloconcrete
I know this could also be out of curiosity, but I'm certain that ability to do a triple major will be a non-issue for you. By the end of first year I'm sure you'll be fairly certain of what you what to do that you won't be needing to pursue three degrees.
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A photo of Phase Phase

@phylloconcrete wrote
I know this could also be out of curiosity, but I'm certain that ability to do a triple major will be a non-issue for you. By the end of first year I'm sure you'll be fairly certain of what you what to do that you won't be needing to pursue three degrees.


I want to do quantum computing, which requires a strong knowledge in all three subjects. So, it seems a triple major would be my only option, as a quantum computing major is not offered in any undergrad.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@Phase wrote
I want to do quantum computing, which requires a strong knowledge in all three subjects. So, it seems a triple major would be my only option, as a quantum computing major is not offered in any undergrad.



A "triple major" is just words on paper. If U of T seriously has such lax course requirements such that you could major in all three of these subjects AND graduate on time (I find that hard to believe, UWaterloo won't even let you do that with two most of the time), then just do it. Just because the school won't give you three majors doesn't mean you can't study all three areas.

Quantum computing is really a graduate area of study; most "intro to quantum computing" courses are fourth year, minimum. It's not an undergrad area of study, which is why you can't find a bachelor's program. The amount of math and physics background needed to comprehend the field are beyond that of an undergrad. Grad schools will look mostly at the actual courses you took at the third and fourth year level, and not just your major. They would consider single majors from all three of these fields, no doubt.
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