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Are twice a week classes better than 3 times a week classes?

A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
So i'm building my class schedule for my 1st year at university. I just want to know from your experience, is it easier if you take them 3 times a week for 50 minutes each, or 2 times a week for 1 hour 20 min each? Or even once a week class for 3 hours each.

Also, could you tell me which courses are better with which choice? Are english courses better with twice a week or 3 times a week? How about math? Statistics? Science courses, like bio, phys, astro, etc? Economic courses?

Thanks a lot
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A photo of SUMmer123456 SUMmer123456

@KittShelby wrote
So i'm building my class schedule for my 1st year at university. I just want to know from your experience, is it easier if you take them 3 times a week for 50 minutes each, or 2 times a week for 1 hour 20 min each?

Also, could you tell me which courses are better with which choice? Are english courses better with twice a week or 3 times a week? How about math? Statistics? Science courses, like bio, phys, astro, etc? Economic courses?

Thanks a lot



2 times a week definitely.

English courses are better with 2 classes a week. Math classes are better 3 times a week. Econ is better with 2 classes a week. Science, I really can't say (it's your call). Courses you find more difficult would probably be better with 3 classes week (so you can ask more questions in class and spend more time mastering material you would have the most difficulty with). Everyone may not feel the same way, though, so you won't really know until you take those courses in uni.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
What's much more important is how your schedule looks as a whole.

What I aim for:
- no more than three hours of lecture straight
- preferably no class earlier than 10AM or 10:30AM
- no night classes, though I'd rather have a night class than one that throws off my sleeping schedule (e.g. having an 8AM class on Tuesday, but having 10AM classes on M, W, Th, F)
- afternoon labs
- little to no class on Friday
- as few three-hour lectures as possible

That's about it. I really don't care if a class is 50 minutes long or 80 minutes long. All other things being equal, I'd give advantage to the 50 minute long class.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I'm going to the University of Alberta by the way. And I'm going to be living with a relative in the NorthEast Edmonton. According to google maps it'll take about 40 mins of transit to get to uni.
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A photo of SUMmer123456 SUMmer123456

@KittShelby wrote
I'm going to the University of Alberta by the way. And I'm going to be living with a relative in the NorthEast Edmonton. According to google maps it'll take about 40 mins of transit to get to uni.



Try to have all your classes in a big chunk then.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
one more thing, does anyone know if it's better to take Math(intro to calc) in the fall semester before taking Statistics(intro to stats) in Winter semester or does it not matter which one I take first? Cause at the moment, I scheduled stats in fall and then math in winter. And I suck in Calculus btw, I hate math. But Math is a requirement, so I have to take it. and so is stats.
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A photo of SUMmer123456 SUMmer123456

@KittShelby wrote
one more thing, does anyone know if it's better to take Math(intro to calc) in the fall semester before taking Statistics(intro to stats) in Winter semester or does it not matter which one I take first? Cause at the moment, I scheduled stats in fall and then math in winter. And I suck in Calculus btw, I hate math. But Math is a requirement, so I have to take it. and so is stats.



You will have to get through calc in any case. Intro to stats probably won't need a lot of the hardcore calc, but it could be a pain if you're not good at either. Is the stats course more focused on statistics or probability? I don't think you really need a lot of calc to do well in stats to be frank, so the order shouldn't be a huge problem.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Take calc first while high school calc is still fairly fresh in your mind. And that way you'll get it done and over with ASAP.
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A photo of aimango aimango

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
What's much more important is how your schedule looks as a whole.

What I aim for:
- no more than three hours of lecture straight
- preferably no class earlier than 10AM or 10:30AM
- no night classes, though I'd rather have a night class than one that throws off my sleeping schedule (e.g. having an 8AM class on Tuesday, but having 10AM classes on M, W, Th, F)
- afternoon labs
- little to no class on Friday
- as few three-hour lectures as possible

That's about it. I really don't care if a class is 50 minutes long or 80 minutes long. All other things being equal, I'd give advantage to the 50 minute long class.


haha hopefully youll get some good choice. three hours of lec straight is highly uncommon for unrestricted majors (so basically anything that isnt engineering)
3 hour lectures are usually night classes. they are usually held for popular electives, and will be usually held in bigger lecture halls. you usually get a 10min break halfway.

50min vs 80min - for profs - 80min classes are better cause they get more material covered in general. usually profs prepare material for each week so the 50min classes require "last day we looked at this.." the difference isnt too great, but if its a morning class, 80min might not be bearable for some people.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Really, what I meant to say is that's what I aimED for when I was in undergrad. I had a few three-hour lectures at Western (would have had more if I didn't intentionally avoid them), and I know they're not uncommon at U of A.
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A photo of inthemaking inthemaking
The shorter the class, the better for me because I get bored, so I would pick 50 min 3x/week. Unless they're 8:30am classes. Having a 3 hour lecture is pure torture for me, especially when it's a 3 hour night class (did that once and never taking a night course again).
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A photo of SUMmer123456 SUMmer123456

@inthemaking wrote
The shorter the class, the better for me because I get bored, so I would pick 50 min 3x/week. Unless they're 8:30am classes. Having a 3 hour lecture is pure torture for me, especially when it's a 3 hour night class (did that once and never taking a night course again).



I took them for econ, which was bird anyways. Made me feel less guilty about skipping continuously since I only did it once a week.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Thanks for all the helpful answers. I have another question. At the moment, I have a few courses in which I only have 10 minutes before the next starts. Has anyone ever done this? I have to do this because all the other times are full. Have you ever had only 10 minutes to get to the next class? Is it as difficult as it seems? and do classes actually start right away on the. Like, I have a class that ends at 10:50, and the next class starts at 11:00. Do classes normally start right dead on time?

Thanks.
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A photo of aimango aimango
mynameismattgotmlgo: ohh haha sorry didnt read the sig : )

@KittShelby wrote
Thanks for all the helpful answers. I have another question. At the moment, I have a few courses in which I only have 10 minutes before the next starts. Has anyone ever done this? I have to do this because all the other times are full. Have you ever had only 10 minutes to get to the next class? Is it as difficult as it seems? and do classes actually start right away on the. Like, I have a class that ends at 10:50, and the next class starts at 11:00. Do classes normally start right dead on time?

Thanks.

ve had friends with this. it depends on the building distances, it's really not worth having to run to class, esp when it can get crowded during that 10 min break when everyones trying to get to their next class.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@aimango wrote
mynameismattgotmlgo: ohh haha sorry didnt read the sig : )

@KittShelby wrote
Thanks for all the helpful answers. I have another question. At the moment, I have a few courses in which I only have 10 minutes before the next starts. Has anyone ever done this? I have to do this because all the other times are full. Have you ever had only 10 minutes to get to the next class? Is it as difficult as it seems? and do classes actually start right away on the. Like, I have a class that ends at 10:50, and the next class starts at 11:00. Do classes normally start right dead on time?

Thanks.

ve had friends with this. it depends on the building distances, it's really not worth having to run to class, esp when it can get crowded during that 10 min break when everyones trying to get to their next class.




awww, that's gonna suck for me then. in both semesters, winter and fall, I will have to run to class 3 times a week....

I have no choice cause most of the classes are full already and I have limited choices and flexibility with my schedule. At least I learned one thing: To enroll in the course immediately right when the enrollment date starts. I will be sure to do that for 2nd year, cause trying to schedule a conflict free schedule with limited choices or class times is a pain in the bum.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Having only 10 minutes between classes is not uncommon at all; in fact, it should be expected. I would aim for it, as you'd otherwise have at least an hour and 10 minutes between classes, and that's never fun. What would be an ideal average day for me would be: 10-10:50 class, 11-11:50 class, gap (for lunch), 1-1:50 class, 2-2:50 class, done.

And, no, the prof doesn't usually start actually lecturing until about 3-5 minutes after the intended start time. So you actually have about 13-15 minutes to walk between classes, plenty enough time to get from one corner of campus to its most distant corner.
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A photo of SUMmer123456 SUMmer123456

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
Having only 10 minutes between classes is not uncommon at all; in fact, it should be expected. I would aim for it, as you'd otherwise have at least an hour and 10 minutes between classes, and that's never fun. What would be an ideal average day for me would be: 10-10:50 class, 11-11:50 class, gap (for lunch), 1-1:50 class, 2-2:50 class, done.

And, no, the prof doesn't usually start actually lecturing until about 3-5 minutes after the intended start time. So you actually have about 13-15 minutes to walk between classes, plenty enough time to get from one corner of campus to its most distant corner.



I agree with this assessment. Particularly considering the fact that you'll be living pretty far away from campus. Killing those odd hours in the middle when you'd rather just be done and get back home can become really annoying (since you rarely get anything productive done in that period from my experience).
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Ok, one more question, though it's not really related to the original question. Do you have to do any presentations in university courses? Because I'm really scared of public speaking and always stutter. If so, which courses do you usually have to do a presentation?
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Large intro classes (all the ones you mentioned in your first post) are unlikely to have oral presentations, so you should be safe for first year. Second-year classes - depends on what you take. In my experience, the second-year bio courses that are required for bio majors are large and, therefore, don't have oral presentations. Third and fourth year classes - most do have required oral presentations, but you could avoid those courses. I usually tried to take courses that 1) interested me and 2) only had one midterm and a final as evaluations (no presentations, no essays, no projects, no labs/seminars, no required textbook), as those courses are the least work. You can find out that information my searching for a course's course outline. Not all the time will it be posted online, but I find it usually is.

Oral presentations are unavoidable though, and that's probably for the best (that's coming from a guy who doesn't like oral presentations either - most people don't). I actually never was bothered by presentations in high school, and I didn't have to do any in first and second year, but then I had a lab course in third year that had several presentations. The first few I was definitely nervous for, and I'm pretty sure you'd be able to tell from watching me do the presentation. I was even considering getting a prescription for propranolol (a drug that blocks that adrenaline rush, I-wanna-get-the-heck-out-of-here feeling people get when fearful; apparently highly recommended for anyone with stage fright). But the more presentations I gave, the more confident I was and the less concerned I was. I had a class in fourth year with seven people in it, and the prof decided that we would each teach a two-hour lecture, so, even though I had built up some confidence the previous year, I was still nervous as hell. Rocked it. I think I got like 92% or something like that. Since then, giving presentations doesn't bother me. Like anything you fear, you need exposure to the feared thing to overcome the fear, and the exposure has to be positive. Giving a presentation when you're fearful is not a good idea because you probably will screw up and then be even more fearful of giving presentations. That's where drugs come in.
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@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
Large intro classes (all the ones you mentioned in your first post) are unlikely to have oral presentations, so you should be safe for first year. Second-year classes - depends on what you take. In my experience, the second-year bio courses that are required for bio majors are large and, therefore, don't have oral presentations. Third and fourth year classes - most do have required oral presentations, but you could avoid those courses. I usually tried to take courses that 1) interested me and 2) only had one midterm and a final as evaluations (no presentations, no essays, no projects, no labs/seminars, no required textbook), as those courses are the least work. You can find out that information my searching for a course's course outline. Not all the time will it be posted online, but I find it usually is.

Oral presentations are unavoidable though, and that's probably for the best (that's coming from a guy who doesn't like oral presentations either - most people don't). I actually never was bothered by presentations in high school, and I didn't have to do any in first and second year, but then I had a lab course in third year that had several presentations. The first few I was definitely nervous for, and I'm pretty sure you'd be able to tell from watching me do the presentation. I was even considering getting a prescription for propranolol (a drug that blocks that adrenaline rush, I-wanna-get-the-heck-out-of-here feeling people get when fearful; apparently highly recommended for anyone with stage fright). But the more presentations I gave, the more confident I was and the less concerned I was. I had a class in fourth year with seven people in it, and the prof decided that we would each teach a two-hour lecture, so, even though I had built up some confidence the previous year, I was still nervous as hell. Rocked it. I think I got like 92% or something like that. Since then, giving presentations doesn't bother me. Like anything you fear, you need exposure to the feared thing to overcome the fear, and the exposure has to be positive. Giving a presentation when you're fearful is not a good idea because you probably will screw up and then be even more fearful of giving presentations. That's where drugs come in.




Thanks a lot for your helpful answers. Really appreciate it. Also, I realize that there are like 3 post by me about similar subjects so from now on if I have anymore questions, I'll just ask in one of these 3 posts.

Anyways, I'll be applying for business for 2nd year after completing the prerequisites in 1st year. I know it's ironic that I'm so nervous about presentations and yet I love business, hahah. I think once I get into Business, most courses will have presentations, am I right? And thanks for your tip on overcoming your fears.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Yes, I'm quite sure business courses typically have presentations.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Does anyone know if it's bearable/smart to have 4 lectures in a row with only 10 minutes in between each for travel time or eating. I need to decide whether to build my schedule into four 50 minutes lectures in a row OR 2 lectures then 70 minute break then 2 lectures again. Is it necessary for me to have a 70 minute break or is 4 lectures in a row actually not that bad? The benefit of having 4 lectures in a row for my schedule is that I get to wake up 1 hour later. But then I would maybe miss lunch though. Although I might be able to eat in class. Does anyone know if you're allowed to eat in lecture classes? cause 10 minutes is not enough time to eat.

My other question is what is a seminar? I have a Biology seminar and I'm just wondering what the heck is that anyways?

Thanks.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Four 50-minute lectures in a row really isn't that bad. Personally, I'd avoid it if I had the choice; most people can pull it off though, albeit painfully. I'd be more willing to do it if it meant sleeping in another hour.

You can eat in class. A lot of people bring at least a snack to class. Heck, I've made banana splits and smores in classes before.

In general terms, a seminar is a small-group (20-30 students) gathering. What you do in seminar varies per course. A first-year biology seminar is probably just going to be a review led by a TA (teaching assistant, usually a grad student) of the last week or two's lecture material. I doubt it would be like, say, a poli sci seminar, in which you'd likely be expected to be prepared to discuss the assigned readings that go along with the lectures.
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A photo of aimango aimango
Yes I had 4 50-min lectures in a row in 1st term. Although we stayed in the same classroom the whole time. It's alright, but gets tiring. A lot of brainwork.

You have very little presentation work for any non-business non-english non-communications course. reason being - theres already a limited time to go through lecture material, profs wont waste time on that.
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