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Are Waterloo's ADV Maths Courses Designed for Students who Do NOT Have Innate Ingenuity?

A photo of waterfall waterfall
Dont be worried so much. The guy who didnt go to his classes and got a 95 is a crackhead
and probably took summer school or private school, where you pretty much pay for your mark. IF you try and put in the effort, im pretty sure youll succeed. If i was an employer, id rather have the hard worker than the arrogant idiot who thinks who knows everything but doesnt do sh*t.
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A photo of Bscit Bscit
Dont be worried so much. The guy who didnt go to his classes and got a 95 is a crackhead
and probably took summer school or private school, where you pretty much pay for your mark. IF you try and put in the effort, im pretty sure youll succeed. If i was an employer, id rather have the hard worker than the arrogant idiot who thinks who knows everything but doesnt do crap.
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A photo of vmicro vmicro
relax; he probably dropped out because he thought he could get away with the same thing in university, and was horribly wrong.

On the flip side, I know a guy who was not spectacularly smart, but worked his ass off and probably did every question in the book a few times and aced calculus, because he knew how to do every imaginable type of question.
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A photo of vmicro vmicro
relax; he probably dropped out because he thought he could get away with the same thing in university, and was horribly wrong.

On the flip side, I know a guy who was not spectacularly smart, but worked his ass off and probably did every question in the book a few times and aced calculus, because he knew how to do every imaginable type of question.
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A photo of Bscit Bscit
Id say he became a druggie.
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles

@waterfall wrote
well, apparently, the guy was the top in our province...


Proof?
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A photo of waterfall waterfall

@iliketurtles wrote

@waterfall wrote
well, apparently, the guy was the top in our province...


Proof?



Well, due to confidentiality issues, I cannot disclose any information about the person any further.

But the point of this thread is to discuss how realistic it is for an average student to enroll in advanced math courses...
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A photo of Bscit Bscit
What you are saying sounds so stupid.
"Err... Someguy got 95 and got screwed over in math, that means everyone below 95 will also get screwed over." Im pretty sure there are more than 4 or 5 who graduate with the Bachelors Degree for Math at Waterloo.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
I'm currently in UW 1st year math and have first year friends in 14x. They are as discussed in this thread so far the type of people with extreme talent for mathematics and don't care too much for hard work. I'll also confirm they also do a decent amount of crack since you guys are all sensitive about the topic - but not all of them are of this type. I don't really see what's wrong with the issue. They are insanely intelligent and are genuinely interested in what they're learning. That beats hard work any day.

The original post seems to be deleted but I can guess the contents of the post. If you're seriously wondering whether 14x is a good fit for you, you probably want it for the wrong reasons and will probably fail hard. And if you don't fail hard, you'll work your ass off and won't gain any of the intended benefits of the courses. Just my opinion.
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A photo of plato plato
You might get a taste by picking up calculus by Spivak, Apostol, or Courant, and trying some of the problems. But that may be misleading.

I have to echo the comment above, if you have to ask, it's more than likely not for you. If I'm not mistaken, they do let you drop to 13* level if the 14* series are too difficult.

I had a friend who loved math and was very good at it. But the level of abstraction in UW's advanced math was beyond his capabilities. He dropped down to regular course and is doing great.

Edit: Doing well at problems you've encountered before does not guarantee understanding.
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A photo of greygoose greygoose
I was skeptical of how I'd perform in the advanced math classes, but I decided I was convinced that I would take them. I got my ass handed to me after midterms in 1A, but I was able to pull my act together and get a 90 in both courses. My performance since has been not as good, but that's more related to health reasons than anything else.

I'm not a genius. The best way you can decide if the courses are right for you is by taking them. Attend them for the first two weeks, slug through the assignments, and most importantly--ASK FOR HELP. For a lot of people in these classes, it will be the first time they've ever needed help with math. The profs hold lots of office hours to be there for you outside of class, and answer emails often. They are really, really supportive.

It's the people that don't ask for help that do poorly in the classes and end up dropping them. You have to have the drive to do well, the courage to ask for help, and the persistence to slug through the assignments to succeed. If you can manage that, you will do well.

Oh yeah, I posted this elsewhere at some point... this is what I wrote up for approximately the first two weeks of MATH 147: http://pub.convextech.ca/goose/math147.pdf
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A photo of plato plato

@greygoose wrote
Oh yeah, I posted this elsewhere at some point... this is what I wrote up for approximately the first two weeks of MATH 147: http://pub.convextech.ca/goose/math147.pdf



Calculus by Spivak is one of my most prized possessions... and I'm not a math student :)
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