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Arts and science programs

A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac
I'm applying to uni in 2012 and I'm doing a lot of research now. I'm really looking into the arts and science programs because I really don't want to choose between arts or science- I love them both.
I've been fascinated by medical books since I was a kid (haha) and I have always loved French and social studies since elementary school. Science and social studies related subjects have also usually been my stronger subjects. Ultimately, I'm thinking of becoming a teacher.
So I have a few questions:

1) Arts and Science at McMaster really attracts me right now. It sounds amazing, but is it a good idea if I want to go to teacher's college afterwards? Would it help me at all? Or would it be easier to major in science and minor in art (or vice versa) with a concurrent education program?

2) And my main question: Are there any other good arts and science programs? I know McGill has one but I haven't heard many people talk about it. Can someone give me their input on other arts and science programs they know of?

Thanks!!
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A photo of jellybeanrow jellybeanrow
Guelph has a bachelor of arts and science program, and they seem like a great school that students seem to love attending. :) There's also always the option of a double major. Western I know offers programs in modules (minor, major, specialization, etc), and so you could easily combine two major modules without a hassle, and I believe you can even earn an honours degree that way, if you're interested in that route. :)

Also another option is, like you said, a major in science/art and a minor in the other, however you could do this with concurrent education as well and save the extra year of tuition for teacher's college! I'd assume you might not have quite as many electives, but overall it should still be a viable option. I haven't looked much into education, so I don't know for sure, but you may also be able to do a double major while pursuing ConEd?

Either way, good luck with your decision, and I hope this helped a little :)
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac

@jellybeanrow wrote
Guelph has a bachelor of arts and science program, and they seem like a great school that students seem to love attending. :) There's also always the option of a double major. Western I know offers programs in modules (minor, major, specialization, etc), and so you could easily combine two major modules without a hassle, and I believe you can even earn an honours degree that way, if you're interested in that route. :)

Also another option is, like you said, a major in science/art and a minor in the other, however you could do this with concurrent education as well and save the extra year of tuition for teacher's college! I'd assume you might not have quite as many electives, but overall it should still be a viable option. I haven't looked much into education, so I don't know for sure, but you may also be able to do a double major while pursuing ConEd?

Either way, good luck with your decision, and I hope this helped a little :)



Thanks!

I didn't know that about Western. And I've never considered Guelph as one of my options, I didn't even know they had an artsci program!

I don't know if a double major is possible with ConEd, I'm already getting 2 degrees... But if I go with ConEd, I'd probably want to do it at Queens. And there, I have to choose between arts and science and I don't know which to go with!

Would it be beneficial in anyway to major in both my teachables? Does it really matter, or am I just wasting my time and money?

Right now I'm thinking of teaching French, or science... maybe math. I really don't know.
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A photo of kraken kraken
You can do majors/minors etc. in both arts and science at... pretty much anywhere. U of T, Queen's, wherever...
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A photo of onlymatthew onlymatthew
Majoring in art and minoring in science is very different from Mac Art Sci. I've always been fond of that program, as it offers you the option to get into grad school in virtually every field. If you look at what people with Art Sci end up doing, many of them going to law, medicine, dentistry, business, so I'm sure a teacher's college degree isn't too out of the picture. Mac Art Sci is also very much about self-development and is at a much higher standard than most basic science programs (it has like an 89 cutoff with like a 93 average acceptance or something ridiculous like that).

I've heard some very negative criticisms about McGill Art Sci, although I'm sorry that I can't elaborate past that. I've heard it's a very different thing from Mac's program though. If you're keen on teaching, then concurrent education might be more relevant to you though. However, I'd suggest you keep your options open with a program like Art Sci.
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A photo of Chickadee Chickadee
I have a friend who is looking at the Art Science Program. She is applying to Guelph and to McMaster, but also to Queen's in Kingston. This is her top choice, and I've heard that the program is really good- but I've heard really great things about McMaster and Guelph too
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A photo of kyleigh711 kyleigh711
I am a freshman this year going into the artsci program at Mac, so I've done quite a bit of research on their program. I also applied to a program at Waterloo called knowledge integration which is another unique arts and science program that's worth checking out. These two programs seemed quite different from all the other arts and science programs that I have seen. I apologize in advance if I write an essay .:bball:

There are several other schools that offer arts and science programs. The ones I know of are McGill, Guelph, and Windsor. There may be others, but be aware that people often don't know what a Bachelor of Arts and Science program is and will direct you towards schools like western, u of t, and queens. None of these schools has an arts and science program, however several have arts and science faculties which are entirely different.

As far as differences in the programs, Guelph, McGill, and Windsor offer programs where you will choose either a minor in the sciences and a minor in the arts, or a major in each, or a minor in one and a major in the other. Most arts and science programs will have you choose two areas of specialization and then have several courses about integrating different subjects. I've heard mixed reviews about these programs. Some people have complained that McGill's program basically just lets you take whatever courses you want without any real direction, other people really like the freedom. Besides Mac and Waterloo, all the arts and science programs I've seen involve choosing two areas of specialization. You could do something similar in most BA or BSc programs by declaring a minor or pursuing a double major.

Mac's program is quite different because you don't need a choose a specialization at all (however you can pursue a combined honors or a minor if you wish). The program has more required courses, including calculus, physics, and economics, as well as a variety of interdisciplinary subjects like western civilization and inquiry. I personally liked that the program includes courses like Writing and Informal Logic which focus on skills that will be useful in any discipline. Mac's program is small (60 people in each year) and more competitive to get into, which makes the program feel more like a community and means that classes are smaller. (All of the classes I've mentioned are only open to artsci students). Graduates from Mac artsci go on to grad school in everything from physics to medicine to sociology, so teaching is definitely an option.

Waterloo's knowledge integration gives you a Bachelor of Knowledge Integration (BKI) but it is still an arts and science program. It also doesn't require you to specialize but again you can do a double major or a minor if you want. The core courses in KI focus on integrating different areas of study, and include courses on the nature of knowledge, creativity, problem solving, and public speaking. There are also several breadth requirements, such as taking a certain number of math and science courses and a language course. The second year includes a trip abroad in preparation for the third year museum course where students create a museum exhibit.

Another possible option is a program like Carleton's Directed Interdisciplinary studies which (I believe) allows you to design your program and choose courses yourself.

Basically any of these programs can lead you to teaching so it really depends what you are looking for in a program. If you want more freedom to choose your courses and don't want as many required courses, Directed interdisciplinary studies is an option. If the latter is true but you don't mind choosing two areas to focus on, a traditional arts and science program may be best (i.e. Mcgill, guelph, etc.) If you are interested in the required courses at Mac or Waterloo and don't want to choose only two subjects to specialize in, one of these programs may be for you.

I hope some of that was helpful and not overly repetitive. Sorry that it's awfully long.
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A photo of monkey245 monkey245
One thing to consider about U of T A&S: "One Major in a science area plus one Major in an arts area leads to either an Hon. B.Sc. or an Hon.B.A. - your choice (two Majors must include at least 12 different courses)"
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac
kyleigh711 I don't mind mini-essays, thanks for taking the time to write one :P I didn't know about a lot of those programs you mentioned. While researching artsci programs, I got really confused, so your post was really helpful!
I checked on electronicinfo and it says this year the enrollment for Mac's artsci is 45! What was your average going in?

And thanks monkey245 as well, I wasn't sure how the program at UofT worked.
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A photo of jammendoza jammendoza
McGill and Guelph ArtSci programs basically consist of choosing an art, choosing a science, and taking classes in both. ArtSci at Mac has an entirely different approach. If you're really interested, you should spend some time looking at McMaster ArtSci website, and looking at the course descriptions of compulsory ArtSci courses. ArtSci at Mac is a really small program , and focuses more on interdisciplinary education rather than multidisciplinary. You'll have the option of combining (double-majoring) in almost any field, alongside taking courses strictly for ArtSci students.

Also, CrèmeGlacée, electronicinfo screwed up somewhere, because this year's ArtSci class started at 75, and we're at 73 right now. They aim for 60 students when they send out offers, but acceptance rates from students has been higher these past few years.
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