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Balancing Work and School

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There have been many questions about how to best balance work and school while in university.

Most notably, check out this thread and we can also continue discussions here :)
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah
This is directed at Army, because I know that he works a TON of hours/ week.

How much time do you spend doing homework, and what kind of grades are you making?
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@kaloolah wrote
This is directed at Army, because I know that he works a TON of hours/ week.

How much time do you spend doing homework, and what kind of grades are you making?



About 2 hours a week, and I've held an A average for my whole university career.
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A photo of ilhan ilhan
its the biggest headache ever, especially when you got a migraine and you have 2 unit tests the next day and your shift ends at midnight.Thats why you quit and work in the summer or take like 3 courses in that semester and make sure one of them is a bird course
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@ilhan wrote
its the biggest headache ever, especially when you got a migraine and you have 2 unit tests the next day and your shift ends at midnight.Thats why you quit and work in the summer or take like 3 courses in that semester and make sure one of them is a bird course


No, you need to work during the school year too. At least 15-30 hours a week should not be hard to accommodate.
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah

@ARMY101 wrote

@ilhan wrote
its the biggest headache ever, especially when you got a migraine and you have 2 unit tests the next day and your shift ends at midnight.Thats why you quit and work in the summer or take like 3 courses in that semester and make sure one of them is a bird course


No, you need to work during the school year too. At least 15-30 hours a week should not be hard to accommodate.



I don't think that it would be advisable for everyone to work while in school. I plan on making school, extra curricular and volunteer work my full time commitment. A job might come after all of that. I can still work summers, and for god knows how many years after graduating. I also may pursue a co-op option, depending on which school I will be attending.

I certainly don't even have time to be working right now (in grade 11). I'm way too busy.
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@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote

@ilhan wrote
its the biggest headache ever, especially when you got a migraine and you have 2 unit tests the next day and your shift ends at midnight.Thats why you quit and work in the summer or take like 3 courses in that semester and make sure one of them is a bird course


No, you need to work during the school year too. At least 15-30 hours a week should not be hard to accommodate.



I don't think that it would be advisable for everyone to work while in school. I plan on making school, extra curricular and volunteer work my full time commitment. A job might come after all of that. I can still work summers, and for god knows how many years after graduating. I also may pursue a co-op option, depending on which school I will be attending.

I certainly don't even have time to be working right now (in grade 11). I'm way too busy.



Your priorities are wrong. It should be school, work, extra-curriculars and volunteering, then social life.

Where is your money coming from now? Where will it be coming from when you're in university?
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah

@ARMY101 wrote

@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote

@ilhan wrote
its the biggest headache ever, especially when you got a migraine and you have 2 unit tests the next day and your shift ends at midnight.Thats why you quit and work in the summer or take like 3 courses in that semester and make sure one of them is a bird course


No, you need to work during the school year too. At least 15-30 hours a week should not be hard to accommodate.



I don't think that it would be advisable for everyone to work while in school. I plan on making school, extra curricular and volunteer work my full time commitment. A job might come after all of that. I can still work summers, and for god knows how many years after graduating. I also may pursue a co-op option, depending on which school I will be attending.

I certainly don't even have time to be working right now (in grade 11). I'm way too busy.



Your priorities are wrong. It should be school, work, extra-curriculars and volunteering, then social life.

Where is your money coming from now? Where will it be coming from when you're in university?



Call me spoiled, but my parents. I know, I know :P ...


@ARMY101 wrote
Where is your money coming from now? Where will it be coming from when you're in university?



I'll work summers, for sure though.
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@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote

@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote

@ilhan wrote
its the biggest headache ever, especially when you got a migraine and you have 2 unit tests the next day and your shift ends at midnight.Thats why you quit and work in the summer or take like 3 courses in that semester and make sure one of them is a bird course


No, you need to work during the school year too. At least 15-30 hours a week should not be hard to accommodate.



I don't think that it would be advisable for everyone to work while in school. I plan on making school, extra curricular and volunteer work my full time commitment. A job might come after all of that. I can still work summers, and for god knows how many years after graduating. I also may pursue a co-op option, depending on which school I will be attending.

I certainly don't even have time to be working right now (in grade 11). I'm way too busy.



Your priorities are wrong. It should be school, work, extra-curriculars and volunteering, then social life.

Where is your money coming from now? Where will it be coming from when you're in university?



Call me spoiled, but my parents. I know, I know :P ...


@ARMY101 wrote
Where is your money coming from now? Where will it be coming from when you're in university?



I'll work summers, for sure though.




That's ridiculous. Working gives you many abilities and skills beyond just making money. You need to work. Even if it's only 20 hours a week.
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah

@ARMY101 wrote

That's ridiculous. Working gives you many abilities and skills beyond just making money. You need to work. Even if it's only 20 hours a week.



In HS, uni or both?

I know that working gives you many skills. In fact, my parents refuse to let me get a part time job in HS, and I suspect that they will continue to have that stance on things until after I graduate university. They're all for putting education first. I do understand why they have this idea, but I do also understand your point of view.


EDIT: I thought that I should mention that I will be putting myself through law school, no doubt about it.
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@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote

That's ridiculous. Working gives you many abilities and skills beyond just making money. You need to work. Even if it's only 20 hours a week.



In HS, uni or both?



Both. In high school I was working 1 job 25 hours a week and volunteering 10 hours a week, and then later I was working 1 job 30 hours a week, 1 job 25 hours a week, and volunteering 5 hours a week. That was still in high school, so there's no excuse you can't do even half or a third of what I did.


I know that working gives you many skills. In fact, my parents refuse to let me get a part time job in HS, and I suspect that they will continue to have that stance on things until after I graduate university. They're all for putting education first. I do understand why they have this idea, but I do also understand your point of view.



That's ridiculous. Refuse and grow up, show them that you need and want to work. Parents like your baby and shelter their kids from reality, and then when the kids get out into the real world they fail.
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah

@ARMY101 wrote

That's ridiculous. Refuse and grow up, show them that you need and want to work. Parents like your baby and shelter their kids from reality, and then when the kids get out into the real world they fail.



I could imagine that situation. In my household, you do not disobey my parents. Their house, their rules. That's reality.

I do think that it sucks sometimes. I have always been treated the way that their parents treated them. There hasn't been much leeway in my upbringing. Going to school counselors, trusted adult members in the community as well as other family members hasn't changed anything much. I just suck it up, because it's not a big deal.

I also don't think that I would be at that much of a disadvantage in "the real world". Do I have much pocket money? Nope, because I put nearly all of my babysitting money away for university. I have a good sense of money anyway, because of exposure to the stock market. My family is also pretty frugal, so money-wise I'm not going to "fail". I can bargain-shop with the best of 'em :cheers:

Time-wise I'm also not going to fail. Most days I practice before school, go to school and then get home at 9 pm. After more flute I get started on my homework and then read for pleasure. Weekends permit more time for socialization. I have proven that I won't fail time-wise.

As for..."resume-wise", I obviously have limited experience (just summer part time work). I still have other things on my CV, and I have still managed to win every award/ bursary that I have applied for. Does that mean that I'm perfect? No. Does that mean that I'm a shoo-in for any major scholarships? Hell to the no. No one is.

Other than these points, why do you think that I'm "going to fail"? I'm curious about this, because the majority of university students that I know do not work part time while studying.
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@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote

That's ridiculous. Refuse and grow up, show them that you need and want to work. Parents like your baby and shelter their kids from reality, and then when the kids get out into the real world they fail.



I could imagine that situation. In my household, you do not disobey my parents. Their house, their rules. That's reality.

I do think that it sucks sometimes. I have always been treated the way that their parents treated them. There hasn't been much leeway in my upbringing. Going to school counselors, trusted adult members in the community as well as other family members hasn't changed anything much. I just suck it up, because it's not a big deal.

I also don't think that I would be at that much of a disadvantage in "the real world". Do I have much pocket money? Nope, because I put nearly all of my babysitting money away for university. I have a good sense of money anyway, because of exposure to the stock market. My family is also pretty frugal, so money-wise I'm not going to "fail". I can bargain-shop with the best of 'em :cheers:

Time-wise I'm also not going to fail. Most days I practice before school, go to school and then get home at 9 pm. After more flute I get started on my homework and then read for pleasure. Weekends permit more time for socialization. I have proven that I won't fail time-wise.

As for..."resume-wise", I obviously have limited experience (just summer part time work). I still have other things on my CV, and I have still managed to win every award/ bursary that I have applied for. Does that mean that I'm perfect? No. Does that mean that I'm a shoo-in for any major scholarships? Hell to the no. No one is.

Other than these points, why do you think that I'm "going to fail"? I'm curious about this, because the majority of university students that I know do not work part time while studying.



I already answered your question: working gives you skills and abilities that cannot be attained by staying at home and having mommy and daddy support you.
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah

@ARMY101 wrote

@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote

That's ridiculous. Refuse and grow up, show them that you need and want to work. Parents like your baby and shelter their kids from reality, and then when the kids get out into the real world they fail.



I could imagine that situation. In my household, you do not disobey my parents. Their house, their rules. That's reality.

I do think that it sucks sometimes. I have always been treated the way that their parents treated them. There hasn't been much leeway in my upbringing. Going to school counselors, trusted adult members in the community as well as other family members hasn't changed anything much. I just suck it up, because it's not a big deal.

I also don't think that I would be at that much of a disadvantage in "the real world". Do I have much pocket money? Nope, because I put nearly all of my babysitting money away for university. I have a good sense of money anyway, because of exposure to the stock market. My family is also pretty frugal, so money-wise I'm not going to "fail". I can bargain-shop with the best of 'em :cheers:

Time-wise I'm also not going to fail. Most days I practice before school, go to school and then get home at 9 pm. After more flute I get started on my homework and then read for pleasure. Weekends permit more time for socialization. I have proven that I won't fail time-wise.

As for..."resume-wise", I obviously have limited experience (just summer part time work). I still have other things on my CV, and I have still managed to win every award/ bursary that I have applied for. Does that mean that I'm perfect? No. Does that mean that I'm a shoo-in for any major scholarships? Hell to the no. No one is.

Other than these points, why do you think that I'm "going to fail"? I'm curious about this, because the majority of university students that I know do not work part time while studying.



I already answered your question: working gives you skills and abilities that cannot be attained by staying at home and having mommy and daddy support you.



I said that I have skills. Working at McDicks isn't really character building. I do understand how some jobs provide ample amounts of on the job training, such as anything in the military.

I can't think of people that "failed at life" just because they didn't work in HS. However, I can think of many people that "failed at life" because they didn't have a good work ethic, social skills or a good money sense in HS. There's a difference.

Practically no one in my family worked while in high school, including both of my parents and all but one of my many cousins. My cousins are engineers, teachers and undergraduate and master's students. One is a lawyer, and she went to Cornell and UC Berkley. She didn't ever work while she was in school.

I'm just trying to understand your philosophy, and I wouldn't mind you elaborating on your theory.
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I already have. You're in grade 11. You're clearly a sheltered, spoiled brat, hence why you don't understand why working is important.
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah

@ARMY101 wrote
I already have. You're in grade 11. You're clearly a sheltered, spoiled brat, hence why you don't understand why working is important.



That's not true. I acknowledged that working is important. I am just pointing out that working while one is in school is not the be all end of of succeeding in life. I am defining "success in life" as the opposite of "failing in life", because you already used the second phrase.
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A photo of ederoo ederoo
Don't listen to Army101...what he really wants is to get you in bed and perhaps demonstrate his "skills" learned as a burger flipper at McDicks.

I only held 1 part time job throughout high school (and only for a few months). I still managed to get the highest/second highest scholarships available at several of the universities I applied to.

Basically, if you have volunteer and extracurricular experience, you DO NOT need paid work experience. That being said, it's good to work during the summer to make some extra cash, but it's not necessary to work during the school year. Save your time for studying and getting involved with useful EC's.
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah

@ederoo wrote
Don't listen to Army101...what he really wants is to get you in bed and perhaps demonstrate his "skills" learned as a burger flipper at McDicks.

I only held 1 part time job throughout high school (and only for a few months). I still managed to get the highest/second highest scholarships available at several of the universities I applied to.

Basically, if you have volunteer and extracurricular experience, you DO NOT need paid work experience. That being said, it's good to work during the summer to make some extra cash, but it's not necessary to work during the school year. Save your time for studying and getting involved with useful EC's.



Thanks, Ederoo!

I wasn't very optimistic after being told that I'm going to fail in life :) Thanks for sharing your story.
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@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote
I already have. You're in grade 11. You're clearly a sheltered, spoiled brat, hence why you don't understand why working is important.



That's not true. I acknowledged that working is important. I am just pointing out that working while one is in school is not the be all end of of succeeding in life. I am defining "success in life" as the opposite of "failing in life", because you already used the second phrase.


If you do not work while in school, you will fail at life. Get your act together and stop talking back to me. Unlike your parents, I will discipline you.
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah

@ARMY101 wrote

@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote
I already have. You're in grade 11. You're clearly a sheltered, spoiled brat, hence why you don't understand why working is important.



That's not true. I acknowledged that working is important. I am just pointing out that working while one is in school is not the be all end of of succeeding in life. I am defining "success in life" as the opposite of "failing in life", because you already used the second phrase.


If you do not work while in school, you will fail at life. Get your act together and stop talking back to me. Unlike your parents, I will discipline you.



I actually have really strict parents.
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@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote

@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote
I already have. You're in grade 11. You're clearly a sheltered, spoiled brat, hence why you don't understand why working is important.



That's not true. I acknowledged that working is important. I am just pointing out that working while one is in school is not the be all end of of succeeding in life. I am defining "success in life" as the opposite of "failing in life", because you already used the second phrase.


If you do not work while in school, you will fail at life. Get your act together and stop talking back to me. Unlike your parents, I will discipline you.



I actually have really strict parents.


HAHAHAHAHA.
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A photo of kaloolah kaloolah

@ARMY101 wrote

@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote

@kaloolah wrote

@ARMY101 wrote
I already have. You're in grade 11. You're clearly a sheltered, spoiled brat, hence why you don't understand why working is important.



That's not true. I acknowledged that working is important. I am just pointing out that working while one is in school is not the be all end of of succeeding in life. I am defining "success in life" as the opposite of "failing in life", because you already used the second phrase.


If you do not work while in school, you will fail at life. Get your act together and stop talking back to me. Unlike your parents, I will discipline you.



I actually have really strict parents.


HAHAHAHAHA.



They limit my access to technology, including time on the computer (except for the holidays, like now), time watching television and I do not have a cell phone or any gaming systems.

As previously discussed, they prohibit me from engaging in certain activities. For a couple of examples, I can not work and they wouldn't let me be in the school musical. I do have some say in what I do, but its definitely not completely left up to me. For the most part I enjoy what I do, and I have not had too many major conflicts over this.


@ARMY101 wrote

Get your act together and stop talking back to me. Unlike your parents, I will discipline you.



I wouldn't be seeing the light of day if I ever talked back to my parents.

Unlike some teens, I would be kicked out of the house if they ever caught me with illegal drugs, cigarettes or alcohol.

Out of the four courses that I`m taking right now, I have a 98% average. About a week and a half ago, I asked if I could go on a three hour choir field trip. I have gone every year since the third grade. They would not let me go, because they didn`t think that I should miss school (in case my grades would suffer). They`re the kind of parents that they expect me to study every day for hours and be in lots of EC`s to `build character`.

Failure to comply with their standards results in privileges being taken away. For me, that normally means being forbidden to see my friends after school and on weekends, so you can bet that I try to obey my parents.

Those are just a few examples.

I would say that they are strict.




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Are you Asian Kaloolah?
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I'm going to say white-washed Chinese/Korean kid.
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