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BBA vs Bcom vs BA (Economics)

A photo of GracePan GracePan
What is the difference between the three? There are a lot of rumours going on about how it's easier to find a job with one degree but not with another. Some people say BA Economics is more theoretical while BBA is more practical.. and Bcom is basically a little bit of everything?

:bounce: Don't know which one to choose.
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A photo of Finance27 Finance27
I'll honestly tell you, it's the school that matters from which you got the degree. BBA and Bcom will be considered the same. However a BA is out of the picture (Economics is sort of different in aspects). After the person, of course.
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@GracePan wrote
What is the difference between the three? There are a lot of rumours going on about how it's easier to find a job with one degree but not with another. Some people say BA Economics is more theoretical while BBA is more practical.. and Bcom is basically a little bit of everything?

:bounce: Don't know which one to choose.



BA Economics is a degree in economics (social sciences), and is offered by the faculty of arts & sciences, department of economics or social sciences.

BBA and BComm are business degrees offered by the business school or business faculty/department. In these degree programs, unless you specialized in managerial economics, the only economics courses you'll take are intro to micro and macro econ (first year courses).
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@GracePan wrote
What is the difference between the three? There are a lot of rumours going on about how it's easier to find a job with one degree but not with another. Some people say BA Economics is more theoretical while BBA is more practical.. and Bcom is basically a little bit of everything?

:bounce: Don't know which one to choose.



BA Economics is a degree in economics (social sciences), and is offered by the faculty of arts & sciences, department of economics or social sciences.

BBA and BComm are business degrees offered by the business school or business faculty/department. In these degree programs, unless you specialized in managerial economics, the only economics courses you'll take are intro to micro and macro econ (first year courses).
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A photo of ixlovexchocolate ixlovexchocolate
hey, I have a question, I'm going to throw BAFM into this (waterloo's accounting program)
do employers even know what a BAFM is? and would they look down on it compared to a BBA or a BCom?
thanks :)
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@ixlovexchocolate wrote
hey, I have a question, I'm going to throw BAFM into this (waterloo's accounting program)
do employers even know what a BAFM is? and would they look down on it compared to a BBA or a BCom?
thanks :)


Waterloo is the most heavily-recruited school for accounting. The CA firms in Ontario will be well aware what a BAFM is, and frankly they don't care what the degree name is. It's a unique program: there's no other program structured like it, and no other program with as much accounting and finance content. It's well-regarded by employers. I also heard that Waterloo created the CompSci degree name, and that doesn't hold anyone back either. You will definitely not be looked down upon compared to BBA/BComm students. Also, most students graduate with a MAcc (and many are close to getting designations).
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@Finance27 wrote
I'll honestly tell you, it's the school that matters from which you got the degree. BBA and Bcom will be considered the same. However a BA is out of the picture (Economics is sort of different in aspects). After the person, of course.


Couldn't be more wrong.

School is almost irrelevant - it's the interview. Recruiters come to the better schools though.

Nothing wrong with a BA of econ....Here (at Laurier) you can still beome a CA, go into Finance, etc. with it. It can be argued econ is better for finance as you know more about the economy and volatility of stocks and whatnot...Although I'd for BBA unless you genuinely like econ. It's tough haha.

Cheers
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@Username81 wrote

@Finance27 wrote
I'll honestly tell you, it's the school that matters from which you got the degree. BBA and Bcom will be considered the same. However a BA is out of the picture (Economics is sort of different in aspects). After the person, of course.


Couldn't be more wrong.

School is almost irrelevant - it's the interview. Recruiters come to the better schools though.

Nothing wrong with a BA of econ....Here (at Laurier) you can still beome a CA, go into Finance, etc. with it. It can be argued econ is better for finance as you know more about the economy and volatility of stocks and whatnot...Although I'd for BBA unless you genuinely like econ. It's tough haha.

Cheers



Econ is hard? Maybe compared to the mushy stuff that they teach at Laurier BBA ahaha.

Econ is better for finance? Economy and volatility of stocks? Spoken like a true frosh.

Queen's Commerce and Queen's Econ are arguably the top programs in Canada in their respective fields.

Queen's Commerce Finance Courses
- Intro to Corp. Finance (mandatory)
- Finance II (mandatory)
- Derivative Securities
- Financial Management : Strategy
- Corporate Financial Planning
- Investment and Portfolio Management
- Financial Modelling
- The Economics of Canada's Financial System
- Empirical Studies in Finance
- International Finance
- Management of Financial Institutions

Queen's Economics Finance Courses
- Financial Markets and Risk Management (more theory intensive, less practical version of commerce portfolio mgmt course)
- Topics in Financial Economics
- Public Finance
Maybe related -
- Macroeconomic Policy (currently taking it.. absolute waste of time)
- Monetary Economics (too theoratical, little practical application)
- Applied Econometrics (not really)
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