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BBA/BCS vs CS (co-op) at Waterloo

A photo of Stranger Stranger
I have a bit of a dilemma.
I don't know whether I should accept the BCS/BBA double degree offer or just the CS (co-op).
It seems the double degree is the obvious choice cause it's more prestigious and all, but I keep doubting myself.
..
Okay, I just made a pro and con chart.



According to this, it seems the logical choice for me is to go with CS (co-op).

Plus I just thought of another con for the double degree - I'm not even that interested in the business side and I've never taken business in HS.

Gargh, I think what's making this decision hard is my ego getting in the way or my fear of future regret. I have this opportunity to go into this program which only selects like 30 or so people (on the UW side), and I could go walking out with a shiny double degree. It almost seems silly to choose the single BCS over the double degree.

However, after an analysis of the pros and cons, it seems I should go with just the BCS. I do want to go into CS (co-op) but I'm tempted by this bigger and better thing.

GAH. I keep leaning to one side then the other.
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A photo of caesar caesar

@Stranger wrote
I have a bit of a dilemma.
I don't know whether I should accept the BCS/BBA double degree offer or just the CS (co-op).
It seems the double degree is the obvious choice cause it's more prestigious and all, but I keep doubting myself.
..
Okay, I just made a pro and con chart.



According to this, it seems the logical choice for me is to go with CS (co-op).

Plus I just thought of another con for the double degree - I'm not even that interested in the business side and I've never taken business in HS.

Gargh, I think what's making this decision hard is my ego getting in the way or my fear of future regret. I have this opportunity to go into this program which only selects like 30 or so people (on the UW side), and I could go walking out with a shiny double degree. It almost seems silly to choose the single BCS over the double degree.

However, after an analysis of the pros and cons, it seems I should go with just the BCS. I do want to go into CS (co-op) but I'm tempted by this bigger and better thing.

GAH. I keep leaning to one side then the other.



I would not say the double degree is prestigious at all. Waterloo Computer Science is "world-class", but Laurier business is hardly considered a strong business school.

In terms of BBA/BCS, it has only been around for one year, and the people in the program (some close friends of mine, they went to my school last year) have been giving me poor reviews about the program so far (they see no long-term benefit). Some have even transferred out into BCS (Co-op). I've completely turned away from this program.
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A photo of Stranger Stranger

@caesar wrote
I would not say the double degree is prestigious at all. Waterloo Computer Science is "world-class", but Laurier business is hardly considered a strong business school.

In terms of BBA/BCS, it has only been around for one year, and the people in the program (some close friends of mine, they went to my school last year) have been giving me poor reviews about the program so far (they see no long-term benefit). Some have even transferred out into BCS (Co-op). I've completely turned away from this program.



I guess I meant intense, not prestigious. :P So to be able to do it would be like woah.

I'm leaning even more towards CS now. :)
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A photo of caesar caesar

@Stranger wrote

@caesar wrote
I would not say the double degree is prestigious at all. Waterloo Computer Science is "world-class", but Laurier business is hardly considered a strong business school.

In terms of BBA/BCS, it has only been around for one year, and the people in the program (some close friends of mine, they went to my school last year) have been giving me poor reviews about the program so far (they see no long-term benefit). Some have even transferred out into BCS (Co-op). I've completely turned away from this program.



I guess I meant intense, not prestigious. :P So to be able to do it would be like woah.

I'm leaning even more towards CS now. :)



Might see you there. I'm sort of juggling Ivey / Queen's / Waterloo CS (Co-op) right now. But I'm most likely going for Ivey.
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A photo of thecookiemonster thecookiemonster

@Stranger wrote

@caesar wrote
I would not say the double degree is prestigious at all. Waterloo Computer Science is "world-class", but Laurier business is hardly considered a strong business school.

In terms of BBA/BCS, it has only been around for one year, and the people in the program (some close friends of mine, they went to my school last year) have been giving me poor reviews about the program so far (they see no long-term benefit). Some have even transferred out into BCS (Co-op). I've completely turned away from this program.



I guess I meant intense, not prestigious. :P So to be able to do it would be like woah.

I'm leaning even more towards CS now. :)


Laurier is strong for business. What are you smoking? (not you Stranger, you're cool)

It may not quite be Ivey/Queen's or Mcgill/Schulich, but it is pretty damn good and combined with Waterloo CompSci is a pretty potent combo.
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A photo of caesar caesar

@thecookiemonster wrote

@Stranger wrote

@caesar wrote
I would not say the double degree is prestigious at all. Waterloo Computer Science is "world-class", but Laurier business is hardly considered a strong business school.

In terms of BBA/BCS, it has only been around for one year, and the people in the program (some close friends of mine, they went to my school last year) have been giving me poor reviews about the program so far (they see no long-term benefit). Some have even transferred out into BCS (Co-op). I've completely turned away from this program.



I guess I meant intense, not prestigious. :P So to be able to do it would be like woah.

I'm leaning even more towards CS now. :)


Laurier is strong for business. What are you smoking? (not you Stranger, you're cool)

It may not quite be Ivey/Queen's or Mcgill/Schulich, but it is pretty damn good and combined with Waterloo CompSci is a pretty potent combo.



Depends on what you define as "business". "Business" is a vague term for a variety of job fields. In terms of job placements, you cannot put Laurier even close to Ivey/Queen's, let alone McGill/Schulich. It is up to the individual to get where they want to go, but the business connections founded in the aforementioned top-tier schools will help you greatly along the path.
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A photo of Shabe Shabe
Wow Stranger, we are the on the same boat since we are thinking exactly the same thing. Except that I didn't apply to BBA/BCS and I am trying to apply to this program now. I got my acceptance to Computer Science co-op though.
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A photo of c1 c1
Can you transfer from DD to CS after 1st year? Ask them, if "yes", you know your choice. Also, could you please describe your CS background, CS contest experience?
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A photo of caesar caesar

@c1 wrote
Can you transfer from DD to CS after 1st year? Ask them, if "yes", you know your choice. Also, could you please describe your CS background, CS contest experience?



It is possible to transfer. However, is it worth it?

He'll be doing Laurier Business entry courses at the same time, which would evidently consume the time required in the math assignments given out during MATH1XX/CS11X/CS13X courses. These core courses are also looked at by various graduate schools, if he chooses to enter that perspective in the future. Not to mention being core courses for employers to see during his co-op terms.

I would suggest, if he does not one day aim to enter business, to stick with CS (Co-op) only. I am currently considering CS (Co-op) only over BCS/BBA, if I choose to go to Waterloo.
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A photo of c1 c1

@caesar wrote

I would suggest, if he does not one day aim to enter business, to stick with CS (Co-op) only. I am currently considering CS (Co-op) only over BCS/BBA, if I choose to go to Waterloo.



i couldn't agree more, if the aim is only CS, DD is wrong choice.

Stranger
If any large companies want hire you as a CS specialist, they will only be interested how good you at CS.
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A photo of Stranger Stranger

@c1 wrote
Can you transfer from DD to CS after 1st year? Ask them, if "yes", you know your choice. Also, could you please describe your CS background, CS contest experience?


I know you can transfer from DD to CS, but I don't think you can vice versa.
I've never taken a CS contest...
I've only taken CS in grade 10 and 11, and it was an easy course. I don't think we did anything really intense. I got a 97-98% both years and one the CS awards in my grades.
I used to code with HTML and CSS when I was younger, but those don't really require the logic that programming requires.



@caesar wrote
It is possible to transfer. However, is it worth it?

He'll be doing Laurier Business entry courses at the same time, which would evidently consume the time required in the math assignments given out during MATH1XX/CS11X/CS13X courses. These core courses are also looked at by various graduate schools, if he chooses to enter that perspective in the future. Not to mention being core courses for employers to see during his co-op terms.

I would suggest, if he does not one day aim to enter business, to stick with CS (Co-op) only. I am currently considering CS (Co-op) only over BCS/BBA, if I choose to go to Waterloo.


Me? I'm not a guy.. heh :p
Yeah, I don't really want to get into business. I want to program or work with making programs.
I'm not sure what business is all about.. Where would programming come to play?
Unless I wanted to program for a business? I don't even know if I'm making sense...
I mean, how would doing CS be useful to someone interested in business?
I can see business being useful to programmers though.



@c1 wrote

i couldn't agree more, if the aim is only CS, DD is wrong choice.

Stranger
If any large companies want hire you as a CS specialist, they will only be interested how good you at CS.


I'm 90% sure I'll just be going to CS now. :) I think it's the better choice for me.


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A photo of syrupticious syrupticious
I'm thinking of doing the Double Degree program, because not many people have 2 bachelor degrees. BBA takes 4 years to complete and BCS takes 4 years to complete. They are both pretty legit. Also having a bacholor degree of Business Administration allows you to get higher position jobs such as manager of a software firm. With just a BCS degree it is difficult to rise up. Also, completing the BBA at Laurier prepares/allows you to write the exam to become a Chartered Accountant. You can also get an MBA which only takes a year to get. With knowledge in business and computer science, you can start a software company as well.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
It really depends on if you're interested in business or not, if you aren't then don't bother. "It's harder/ more intense" is not a valid reason for picking a program over another. But a business degree + CS degree sounds like you'd have a great advantage if you plan on going into anything management. With a CS degree you can get a specialization/ minor in another area, so there's more room to explore.

Personally, if you don't know for sure what you're going to do in the future, then go with CS.
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A photo of waazup waazup
Good thread, I do believe combining CS with BBA would definitely be beneficial once done, but then again the stress load. I would not underestimate your capabilities, just try to push yourself, you can do it, the program is designed for you to be able to do both. CS alone is good, with BBA it's even better for the future to come. At least you won't be doing CS with a hard-ass business program like Ivey, now that is a tough choice.
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A photo of Stranger Stranger
Oh man, I'm doubting myself again...
Maybe I should do the double degree. I want to be able to move up, though I can't really see myself being a manager.
I probably could do the double degree, but I'd have to make a lot of sacrifices... Sacrifices that may not be worth it. Like health. I'm the kind of person to get burnt out easily. I don't handle stress very well.
Ah, such tough decisions to make. :(
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A photo of Stranger Stranger
Is anyone else choosing the CS (co op) over the double degree? :S

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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@Stranger wrote
Plus I just thought of another con for the double degree - I'm not even that interested in the business side and I've never taken business in HS.




So why are you even considering it?! Seriously. "I think it will give me better job prospects for a job I'm not interested in." What?

The business in high school thing is moot. If you think even a large number of successful businesspeople learned anything in high school for what they're doing... sorry, no. :P

(Also, SUPER LOL at thinking you're going to meet intelligent, like-minded people in business ;) I can't tell you the number of people I've met that have said "Oh, you're in pure math?! I was in that program but switched into business because it was too hard." I won't even comment on the ego boost.)

I would argue that CS co-op done right is harder than BBA/BCS, because the courses require more effort and are more mathematical. Though you won't be missing out on a significant number of CS courses taking this degree--it is more similar to a joint CS major and a business degree than say, CFM which cuts out a lot more.

But seriously. You say you're not interested in business. Why consider a degree with half its courses in business? This won't help too much in the job market unless you actually want business jobs.

I have one recommendation for you: stop worrying about what other people are doing or what other people think. Do what's right for you, and do it well!
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A photo of Stranger Stranger

@greygoose wrote
So why are you even considering it?! Seriously. "I think it will give me better job prospects for a job I'm not interested in." What?

The business in high school thing is moot. If you think even a large number of successful businesspeople learned anything in high school for what they're doing... sorry, no. :P

(Also, SUPER LOL at thinking you're going to meet intelligent, like-minded people in business ;) I can't tell you the number of people I've met that have said "Oh, you're in pure math?! I was in that program but switched into business because it was too hard." I won't even comment on the ego boost.)

I would argue that CS co-op done right is harder than BBA/BCS, because the courses require more effort and are more mathematical. Though you won't be missing out on a significant number of CS courses taking this degree--it is more similar to a joint CS major and a business degree than say, CFM which cuts out a lot more.

But seriously. You say you're not interested in business. Why consider a degree with half its courses in business? This won't help too much in the job market unless you actually want business jobs.

I have one recommendation for you: stop worrying about what other people are doing or what other people think. Do what's right for you, and do it well!



Well, although I'm not planning to go into business, I'd think that having a business degree would be helpful if you're working for a large company...

Also, it's not that I think there will be intelligent people in business but you'd have to have a high average to get into the double degree program in the first place.

But yeah, I probably will end up accepting CS (coop).
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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@Stranger wrote

Well, although I'm not planning to go into business, I'd think that having a business degree would be helpful if you're working for a large company...

Also, it's not that I think there will be intelligent people in business but you'd have to have a high average to get into the double degree program in the first place.

But yeah, I probably will end up accepting CS (coop).




Marks mean nothing, so don't go extrapolating from marks to intelligence. As I said/tried to imply, business is a much more slack program than the pure technical fields. If you want intelligent people, go find some C&O or PMATH students. There's a reason both programs have maybe 50 people enrolled in all of the math faculty.

But anyhow, how do you figure that a business degree might be useful for a large company? If you're not *doing* a business job, why should you think you need a business degree? I am working for a large company right now on my first co-op. Job experience, competence (demonstrated in one way or another), and networking especially is far more important than some business degree, which the job markets are being flooded with I might add.

Edit: You're probably thinking of an MBA. Which can be quite helpful. A bachelor's degree in business isn't worth much more than a Bachelor of Arts degree.
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A photo of caesar caesar

@Stranger wrote

@greygoose wrote
So why are you even considering it?! Seriously. "I think it will give me better job prospects for a job I'm not interested in." What?

The business in high school thing is moot. If you think even a large number of successful businesspeople learned anything in high school for what they're doing... sorry, no. :P

(Also, SUPER LOL at thinking you're going to meet intelligent, like-minded people in business ;) I can't tell you the number of people I've met that have said "Oh, you're in pure math?! I was in that program but switched into business because it was too hard." I won't even comment on the ego boost.)

I would argue that CS co-op done right is harder than BBA/BCS, because the courses require more effort and are more mathematical. Though you won't be missing out on a significant number of CS courses taking this degree--it is more similar to a joint CS major and a business degree than say, CFM which cuts out a lot more.

But seriously. You say you're not interested in business. Why consider a degree with half its courses in business? This won't help too much in the job market unless you actually want business jobs.

I have one recommendation for you: stop worrying about what other people are doing or what other people think. Do what's right for you, and do it well!



Well, although I'm not planning to go into business, I'd think that having a business degree would be helpful if you're working for a large company...

Also, it's not that I think there will be intelligent people in business but you'd have to have a high average to get into the double degree program in the first place.

But yeah, I probably will end up accepting CS (coop).




BCS/BBA is simply not the same as BMath/BBA. The BBA will mean very little if you intend to work in the CS/IT field.

Whereas, with the BMath/BBA, the BBA compliments the BMath by allowing for application of the math in finance/quant work.

That's sort of why I rejected BCS/BBA, I regret not applying to BMath/BBA (and the director told me it was very difficult to transfer into BMath/BBA from any other program).
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A photo of Stranger Stranger
I wasn't trying to say marks = intelligence, but whatever...
You probably think I'm some sort of idiot. :p
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A photo of ZzZ ZzZ
I don't think doing a BBA will help. However, doing an MBA after CS might help. :cheers:
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