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Best Dietitics Program

A photo of cwani cwani
HI Everyone!

What is your thoughts on the best Applied Human Nutrition bachelors degree in Canada?? I am looking at UBC and Guelph.... I'm not sure which would give me the best education and understanding...

Thanks for any and all input!!

Christa
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A photo of CatRunner CatRunner
Any of the programs that are accredited by dietitians of Canada make excellent choices.

The schools I applied to were: Guelph, Western, MSVU, Ryerson and Acadia. I was accepted at all of these schools. I also looked at U of Alberta, but their program is not direct-entry - you can only apply after at least one year of university. Guelph and Acadia were my top two choices, based on their curriculum, and I chose Guelph, in part because I was awarded several large scholarships here and also because I fell in love with the campus, the people here, and the whole atmosphere at the university. There are so many programs here at Guelph to help students succeed. I love it!

UBC's program includes part of your internship in your undergraduate program. Does that interest you? I wanted a school without an integrated internship program as I plan on doing a Masters degree afterwards, so plan on doing my internship as part of a Masters (either at Guelph, Western, MUN or MSVU). If you like the idea of getting the internship completed as part of your undergraduate (and taking on an extra year to complete the degree), then UBC would be best. If you would rather do your internship after, then Guelph is your choice.

Good luck - feel free to ask me about Guelph's program. I love it here.
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A photo of ktel ktel
I am fairly certain the U of A's program includes an internship, based on people I know in the program. Not sure if it's optional or not.
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A photo of cwani cwani
The internship would be nice to have included into the program but it isn't a must. I can always go through Dietitions canada from what I understand.
I didn't care for the UofA because any time that I called or emailed for information they weren't very fun. Also as you said it wasn't direct entry into this program. I really want the atmosphere to be great!
What I did love at Guelph is that it seemed more hands on and smaller class sizes. Which in turn would be better learning and they had a bunch of volunteer options etc that you can get involved in.
I did notice that McGill had the program in 3.5 years and placed their internships in between the school years in the summer. That really interested me so that I didn't have to spend an extra year interning for a year.
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A photo of CatRunner CatRunner
I think the 3.5 year program at McGill is for those coming from CEGEP. Does that apply to you? For those who didn't do CEGEP, it is 4.5 years, and also includes the internship, which is nice if you want that.

At U of Alberta, ktel, I believe the internship is optional. At least that's what I was told when I looked into their program. You aren't guaranteed an internship with their program, like you are at McGill or UBC - you have to go through a competitive process to get into it. But maybe they've changed things since I looked into it.

Acadia and MSVU also have optional internships as part of their programs - again, competitive to apply to, so not everyone in dietetics will get into the internship. Whereas the Ontario schools (Western, Guelph, and Ryerson) don't include the internship at all, but Western and Guelph offer the internship as part of a Masters program, post-undergrad.

I like the idea of the Masters internship as I feel I will have more knowledge and education when I am completing my internship. But I also know some people love the idea of getting it out of the way as part of their undergrad. So it really depends on the individual.

The bottom line is any of the Dietitians of Canada accredited programs will help you to reach the goal of becoming a registered dietitian. I do love Guelph, and have taken full advantage of the opportunities I've had here. I love the small class sizes and that my profs know who I am - they know my name, my interests, the fact that I'm the "group fitness instructor", etc. I had a very positive experience right from the start with all of the people I doubt with (which I also had at Acadia and Brescia, I have to say - positive interactions with all the folks at those two schools as well).

So it really comes down to what you are looking for. Do you want an integrated internship? Look at UBC or McGill. Do you want the option to compete for an internship? Acadia or MSVU (or U of Alberta if you think you will have the university marks to get into their program after one year of studies). Do you like a large university? McGill, U of A or UBC. Do you like a big city? Ryerson or McGill. Do you like a smaller city? Guelph, Acadia, or Western. Do you like small, intimate classes? Guelph or Acadia. Do you want interactions with lots of people outside of your program? Western, McGill, UBC or U of A.
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A photo of cwani cwani
Thanks! That helps out a lot!
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A photo of ktel ktel

@cwani wrote
I didn't care for the UofA because any time that I called or emailed for information they weren't very fun.




Welcome to university. It is often stupid and bureaucratic, people can be slow to respond, and some university support staff are not very fun people to deal with. But the people who do care are awesome and make the experience totally worthwhile. You were probably contacting the wrong person (a grumpy support staff person who gets a million e-mails a day)
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A photo of CatRunner CatRunner
Don't worry, OP, university does not need to be stupid or bureaucratic. Of course there is paperwork that needs to be done, and regulations that need to be followed, but most places you will find that people are pleasant and helpful.

As I said, all of my interactions with the staff and students at Acadia, Western/Brescia and Guelph were pleasant and stress-free. MSVU was neutral - they were timely, but weren't overly enthusiastic or went out of their way like the other three schools. I had not-so-great experiences dealing with the people at Ryerson, McGill and U of Alberta, where they either never answered my queries, were downright rude, or otherwise unhelpful. Now, maybe I was talking to the wrong people there, or maybe there is just more bureaucracy and stupidity at large universities, I don't know.

Now obviously there are good people at all of those schools, and obviously there are many students who have great experiences there. I think it all depends on the type of person you are, what environment suits you best, and where you feel you can thrive. I do like all the supports in place here at Guelph that are designed to help first year students succeed, as well as all the many volunteer and extra-curricular possibilities. I love that Guelph has a running club and an equestrian club, for example, two clubs that I was unable to find at U of A or Ryerson. But I'm sure there are clubs there for those with other interests.
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A photo of ktel ktel
Even people I know at small universities (even Guelph!) have to deal with the stupid bureaucracy. It's just how universities are. They're just like the government. Very entrenched in the way things are always done and not super open to change.
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A photo of cwani cwani
I agree Ktel but at the same time it's their job and if they don't like it they should change it to something that suits them more. And I had contacted 4 different people with a similar attitude. When I had contacted other dietitics courses I was welcomed much much more. Even then I asked a few students that went to U of A in different majors and none had any real pleasant experiences.
The attitude and environment are really important to me and the U of A just didn't make the cut....

Sorry.
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A photo of CatRunner CatRunner
The only stupid bureaucracy I've had to deal with involves parking. Everything else has been smooth and easy. Is there bureaucracy? Yes, of course. But, at Guelph, they really do go out of their way to make sure that everything is as pain-free as possible, that you have a clear program plan, and that the bureaucracy is minimal.

Maybe it is different in other programs. Maybe it's because I'm in a small department (Family Relations and Applied Human Nutrition). Maybe in the larger departments there is more bureaucracy.

I'm not saying there is no bureaucracy. I'm saying that it is smooth and that people here go out of their way to make things as easy as possible. It's certainly not "stupid."

As I said, I had a very different experience with Western/Brescia, Acadia, and Guelph, than I did with some of the other schools. People were generally more pleasant, more prompt, and more interested in helping me, as opposed to getting me out of their way or passing me on to the next person.

Again, other people's experiences may be different. All I know is that out of all my friends, those who went to schools like U of T, Ottawa U, U of A, and even McGill, have not enjoyed their first year experiences. Whereas those who went to St. FX, Guelph, McMaster and Western have been far happier. Maybe we are all "small town" people at heart, and perhaps that's why we've done better at these schools. I'm sure there are people that love large universities and large cities. And I'm sure those people succeed in that environment. I know I wouldn't, especially based on the interactions I had with some of the individuals from those larger schools.

Bottom line: in my experience, you don't have to deal with stupid bureaucracy at all universities. Bureaucracy, yes. Stupid bureaucracy, no. As I said, the only negative interaction I've had here has been with the parking people. No doubt because they deal with a lot of people who don't want to pay parking tickets!
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A photo of ktel ktel

@cwani wrote
I agree Ktel but at the same time it's their job and if they don't like it they should change it to something that suits them more. And I had contacted 4 different people with a similar attitude. When I had contacted other dietitics courses I was welcomed much much more. Even then I asked a few students that went to U of A in different majors and none had any real pleasant experiences.
The attitude and environment are really important to me and the U of A just didn't make the cut....

Sorry.



I honestly could care less what school you go to, so no need to apologize. Just realize university is not high school and people aren't going to be as attentive to you as you would probably like.

And CatRunner, just wait until you have to do something that in your mind should be really simple but somehow it takes forever and you have to talk to 3 different people to get it done. That's bureaucracy, and I'd certainly call it stupid.
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