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Best undergrad b-school for...

A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Hello SAF,

I was looking upon some answers/opinions regarding which of the schools listed is best for finance, but on the more quantitative/technical side. In other words, I would not really enjoy a liberal arts/right brained type of program.

- McGill Desautels
- Schulich
- Ivey
- Queens
- WLU/UW BBA/Math
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
Well the DD at Waterloo probably gives you the best technical background, whether it be CS or Math. I know you can major in math at Desautels, which is technical I suppose but I know of no one in the program so I know nothing about how technical it really is, it just sounds it. I'm sure you can major in finance/minor in math/cs at any of those schools, so you'll get a technical background if you really want it. :)
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I like the UW/WLU DD, but there are some things I'm worried about:

(No particular order)

1. WLU's business program not as good as other mentioned
2. Waterloo's math is a KILLER apparently. I'm not bad at math or anything, I'm much above average, but I wouldn't say I am AMAZING at it
3. Low GPA due to intensity of DD program

Thanks for the reply though, I value your opinion :)
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
A Laurier BBA can get you plenty of places, especially with the co-op. If you go on the UW side though, you'll have access to the UW co-op jobs, which are more technical-y apparently. If you go to the WLU side, you'll have access to the WLU co-op jobs, etc.
I think someone said that the average for all the DD's is like 80% or something? Which isn't so bad I suppose. But then again I could just have a bad memory lol
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A photo of caveman caveman
What area of finance are you wishing to pursue? Or have you not done enough research and would like to learn more about the different areas before deciding? Are you set on finance? Do you have any back-ups?
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I have done some research, and here's what I have come up with:

- Investment Banking Analyst (I understand Ivey is the best for this?)
- Trader/stock broker
- Private equity
- Financial Analyst


Investment Banking probably appeals to me most. I understand the hours are crazy, but any well paying job is, i.e surgeon, lawyer, etc. I have done research about Risk Management/Quantitative Analyst, but I read usually a Master's and even Phd's in math/physics are needed! (wow) What do you think about these different finance careers and could you list anymore you think would suit a more mathematical/left brained guy like me?

Thanks in advance
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
You don't need any technical background for investment banking, although a technical background is usually required (or preferred) for stock trading. Private equity usually comes after investment banking, and the term financial analyst is too broad imo.
http://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/investment-banking-major/
That article should be interesting for you to read, although the entire site pertains to investment banking/private equity for the most part, they do cover some S&T jobs.
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A photo of caveman caveman

@VladimirB wrote
I have done some research, and here's what I have come up with:

- Investment Banking Analyst (I understand Ivey is the best for this?)
- Trader/stock broker
- Private equity
- Financial Analyst


Investment Banking probably appeals to me most. I understand the hours are crazy, but any well paying job is, i.e surgeon, lawyer, etc. I have done research about Risk Management/Quantitative Analyst, but I read usually a Master's and even Phd's in math/physics are needed! (wow) What do you think about these different finance careers and could you list anymore you think would suit a more mathematical/left brained guy like me?

Thanks in advance



Have you considered actuarial science?

If you were looking to get into something technical like algorithmic trading or something, I would suggest doing a math/cs/engineering degree (if you can handle it) and then either do a minor in biz/econ and/or join the investment club and do some research/learning on your own.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Thanks for the article, it is very interesting to read! :)

About Private Equity, I understand it is after IB, but can you guys explain what it really is? I mean, I have read about it, but usually definitions and explanations of the career are too broad :S As to financial analysts, I suppose I need to be broad for now, as I am only just finishing up grade 11 :P

Pertaining to "You don't need any technical background for investment banking", it's kind of in my own interest to still study the technical side of finance. In my opinion, general BBA's are almost useless as millions of people have them. I need something to "stand out" with. :)
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles

@VladimirB wrote
Thanks for the article, it is very interesting to read! :)

About Private Equity, I understand it is after IB, but can you guys explain what it really is? I mean, I have read about it, but usually definitions and explanations of the career are too broad :S As to financial analysts, I suppose I need to be broad for now, as I am only just finishing up grade 11 :P

Pertaining to "You don't need any technical background for investment banking", it's kind of in my own interest to still study the technical side of finance. In my opinion, general BBA's are almost useless as millions of people have them. I need something to "stand out" with. :)


Private equity is basically a giant company who raises lots of money to buy private companies (not traded on stock exchanges). These companies can control anywhere from tens of millions (extremely small) to billions (these are called mega-funds) of dollars. Basically the idea is that they buy large chunks of/entire private companies and sell them later on down the road for a profit. i.e. buy a company for $500 million, sell it for $800 million later. I realize that's kind of a super simplified definition, and that I may have missed something, but that's all I really feel like writing atm, lol
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A photo of caveman caveman

@VladimirB wrote
Thanks for the article, it is very interesting to read! :)

About Private Equity, I understand it is after IB, but can you guys explain what it really is? I mean, I have read about it, but usually definitions and explanations of the career are too broad :S As to financial analysts, I suppose I need to be broad for now, as I am only just finishing up grade 11 :P

Pertaining to "You don't need any technical background for investment banking", it's kind of in my own interest to still study the technical side of finance. In my opinion, general BBA's are almost useless as millions of people have them. I need something to "stand out" with. :)


If you are going to gain a technical background though, you're i) wasting time/money that could be better spent on something else, ii) signalling to recruiters that you are more suited to a more technical job. You can still do it, and many do, but it's not always the best option. But as long as you're aware that there are many other jobs within finance and related fields that you could enter, that's probably good enough. Just don't be expecting to land a Wall Street gig at age 19 because you are differentiated from your competition.
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