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Big university vs Small university

A photo of EmilySmith EmilySmith
So we all know that McGill is the number one school in Canada but does it really help to go there and make average grades, when you could get your BSc from Mt. A or Bishops with top notch grades? When it comes to hiring after graduation would students from Queens get hired over Acadia graduates? And when it comes to Med school, do they stand more of a chance in getting in?
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A photo of Zion Zion
Rankings are debatable and, frankly, useless. But McGill does carry a certain international reputation that Mt. A and Bishop's lack. Going to McGill does not guarantee "average grades" just as Mt. A and Bishop's do not guarantee "top notch grades." Employers will care where you went, and so will grad/professional schools outside of Canada. Otherwise it doesn't make a difference. If your ultimate goal is med school then I would recommend going to a school with less deflation (not McGill or U of T). If you're unsure, just go to whatever school you like the most cause it's possible you'll do the best where you're happiest.
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A photo of VegaKrazmych VegaKrazmych
My view on it is this: while going to a large university looks impressive, it's no guarantee of getting a job, anyway. You need to have good employability skills, and interview skills.

Also, it depends on your mindset. If you are more comfortable at a smaller university, go to one! It's much better than trying to force yourself to go somewhere larger just because it has a better reputation.
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A photo of steve steve
Although a degree from a reputable university is impressive, generally a degree from any university is enough. As long as you have a sufficient education and good interpersonal skills, then starting a career should not be a problem.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I've been to both big and small universities and predictably found that there's benefits to both.
Big schools: More resources, generally more respected in the job field, diversity
Small schools: Personable, better professors who care about individual students, small school atmosphere and friendship
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@EmilySmith wrote
So we all know that McGill is the number one school in Canada but does it really help to go there and make average grades, when you could get your BSc from Mt. A or Bishops with top notch grades? When it comes to hiring after graduation would students from Queens get hired over Acadia graduates? And when it comes to Med school, do they stand more of a chance in getting in?



McGill might be number one but if your getting A's in a top notch school vs a slightly lower regarded school doesn't really matter in the long run. 5 years after you graduate an employer won't really care where your graduated from, what they really care about is what you have done in that 5 year span. Pick a school that is comfortable to you and enjoy your time while things re simpler.
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A photo of Tyra Tyra
I would choose the school you would be most confortable in and that goes with your learning style whether you would benefit more from the extra teacher assistance you could get in a smaller school.
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A photo of shacheung shacheung
agree w/ TFast
i guess try to find sth in b/w?
heheee
gd luck!
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A photo of anbootsm anbootsm
I agree with many of the people before me.

the most important thing is that you like the university and the programs are courses that it offer, one thing that has really helped me is looking at courses offered at different universities, and the way that their different programs work, also visiting the school is always a good idea

it doesn't matter what the school reputation is if you hate it there you will do poorly and that is never good
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A photo of nakhuda93 nakhuda93
I am having the same problem but not with McGill (which btw my dad graduated from). I am thinking of going to UOIT for nuclear engineering because it's a unique program with good job prospects after graduation. However I would not even consider UOIT for mechanical engineering because I don't like they're specializations and as mentioned before they are still developing their reputation as a university. Now thats not to say they are a bad school but for mechanical engineering if I had the choice I would go somewhere else. Likewise I don't really want to go to Waterloo for engineering either because most of their grads end up at RIM and Microsoft, two companies which don't really interest me career wise. Instead of looking at the school in general try comparing the individual programs. My dad who went to McGill told me himself if he had the choice now he wouldn't go there because engineering isn't their main thing, and at least when he went there, all the equipment was pretty old. So don't just pick a school for the rep. As many people said before it's not all about the GPA, you're going to spend four years and a hell of a lot of money might as well make it worth while.
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