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Biomed at Western

A photo of ashleyking24 ashleyking24
Has anyone here on Student Awards been accepted into Western's Biomed program yet? It's the only program I haven't heard back from and I'm beginning to get a little anxious. Plus could anyone who's currently in the program say what their average was when they were accepted and maybe just give a little insight to what the program is like? I'd really appreciate it.
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A photo of Jsonga Jsonga
A few people have with what seems like 92%+ first semester. I'm wondering how much the much the entrance average will change with respect to last year's.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I have a 91-92 and I have yet to hear back as well, alongside many people in that low 90's range, despite people with as low as 86 getting accepted. It's very disorganized this year apparently, but there's nothing to worry about because most of the acceptances (especially for science/healthsci/biomed/kin) are going out in may. I should practice what I preach though, every day I freak out more and more about it.

Don't get me wrong though, lots of people on this forum and that I know in person HAVE been accepted.

By the way, good choice in terms of choosing western ;)

Last year's cutoff was 85.5% I believe and the average was 87.1% (so I've been told). I have many friends in first/second/third year bio med at western so I'll spill everything I've heard. First two years are identical to general sciences in terms of your courses/classes/profs. There are no special classes for bio med applicants, you're all in one room with all the people taking calculus or chemistry, no matter what program they are in, which can be 800 students per time slot I hear. We have the option of one elective alongside a math course, chemistry, biology and physics *unless you choose to do physics in second year. I personally am going to be taking psych with Mike for my elective :) Also, everyone says that they may struggle through the first two years but still end up on top in third and fourth year when it counts, meaning getting 90s. Not really sure how that works out (maybe because you pick specifically what interests you?) Anyway, here's what I know for the specific classes.

Calculus - Contrary to popular belief, you don't have to take calculus. It will end up helping you out in chemistry in the long run but not everyone has to take it, despite most people choosing to do so anyway. It's pretty much the same as it should be in high school, where you learn the material, study, do the tests. I've had people who are mediocre studiers, big socializers, say that calculus is brutal, but I've also heard the story from people who finished with a 99% in the class. You are literally given everything you need to succeed, just keep up with the work. I've heard that 50 questions per night are assigned sometimes and as long as you can keep up and do the questions when they are assigned, you'll get all the studying you need and midterms/finals should not be stressful, especially because you are given (or maybe have to buy) a book containing previous midterms which are an excellent study tool. Not to mention exams are multiple choice so if you are prone to making silly errors, chances are you'll notice right away when your answer's not an option :P The first mid term for calc is limits and differentiations. Applications are on the first term final. Integration is taught in second term.

Physics - I've heard mixed feelings. I've personally never taken physics in high school so I'm taking the intro to physics instead of biophysics. A lot of bio med majors/modules in third year require biophysics so do your research ahead of time. I've heard many mixed reviews. The majority will say DO NOT TAKE BIOPHYSICS ZINKE IS SATAN! But I've also heard that exams are open book, tests are online, and in terms of tests everyone gathers their laptops together and does the tests together. Also, everyone fails the exams but ends up with 80's. Intro to physics is just the usual physics with the math and stuff. Biophysics is all about movement and what not whereas intro to physics is like machines and all that stuff.

Chemistry - A lot of high school review at first but come second term everyone is screwed over. The second term midterm this year averaged about a 53% I believe, and that's because 2 people got 100% whereas everyone else essentially failed. The students were literally wondering why on earth they studied and how on earth the professors came up with these questions. They suggest really getting to know your equilibrium stuff now before it bites you next year because it only gets worse.

Biology - You don't pick your prof, I think there's only one. You can choose what specific biology course, whether plants or cells or what. I haven't looked much into this but it wasn't my biggest concern I suppose. I haven't heard anything bad about biology, only that it's 100% knowledge based, a more in-depth version of what we learn in Biology 12.

I don't know anything about the labs or tutorials unfortunately, or what a schedule would be like (other than BUSY!) There's a fantastic science student council though and lots of guidance when it comes to planning out your courses in future years and what path you'll take, etc. One thing I've heard for sure though is that you can come out with a great experience and good grades from western bio med (unlike at queens or mac where you'll kill yourself doing work for no gain).

That's pretty much all I know. If you have any questions, I can do my best to answer based off what I know. Also I've stayed over for multiple weekends and western is just freaking awesome. And the bio med students really do seem to love it (aside from that one chem mid term!) Also there's tons of information on the website about all the classes, modules and requirements and if this was posted sooner I would highly suggest going to open house! The only difference between bio med and general sciences is that if you apply for bio med out of high school you just have to maintain the required 78% average of bio, chem, math, 60% in physics and you need to pass your elective. At the end of first or second year and you're in general sciences, you can apply to be in bio med. That's the only difference. I think there might actually still be some sort of minimal application process for people who get accepted right out of high school.

See, with all this extensive research on this program, I'll be REALLY damn disappointed if I don't get in! :P
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A photo of wtsmb wtsmb
ESM Biological & Medical Sciences...accepted in late Feb. with 89.8 average:)
don't worry, I've seen people with 87 average who is accepted.
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A photo of HHuskies9 HHuskies9

@chelsealaurensinclair wrote
I have a 91-92 and I have yet to hear back as well, alongside many people in that low 90's range, despite people with as low as 86 getting accepted. It's very disorganized this year apparently, but there's nothing to worry about because most of the acceptances (especially for science/healthsci/biomed/kin) are going out in may. I should practice what I preach though, every day I freak out more and more about it.

Don't get me wrong though, lots of people on this forum and that I know in person HAVE been accepted.

By the way, good choice in terms of choosing western ;)

Last year's cutoff was 85.5% I believe and the average was 87.1% (so I've been told). I have many friends in first/second/third year bio med at western so I'll spill everything I've heard. First two years are identical to general sciences in terms of your courses/classes/profs. There are no special classes for bio med applicants, you're all in one room with all the people taking calculus or chemistry, no matter what program they are in, which can be 800 students per time slot I hear. We have the option of one elective alongside a math course, chemistry, biology and physics *unless you choose to do physics in second year. I personally am going to be taking psych with Mike for my elective :) Also, everyone says that they may struggle through the first two years but still end up on top in third and fourth year when it counts, meaning getting 90s. Not really sure how that works out (maybe because you pick specifically what interests you?) Anyway, here's what I know for the specific classes.

Calculus - Contrary to popular belief, you don't have to take calculus. It will end up helping you out in chemistry in the long run but not everyone has to take it, despite most people choosing to do so anyway. It's pretty much the same as it should be in high school, where you learn the material, study, do the tests. I've had people who are mediocre studiers, big socializers, say that calculus is brutal, but I've also heard the story from people who finished with a 99% in the class. You are literally given everything you need to succeed, just keep up with the work. I've heard that 50 questions per night are assigned sometimes and as long as you can keep up and do the questions when they are assigned, you'll get all the studying you need and midterms/finals should not be stressful, especially because you are given (or maybe have to buy) a book containing previous midterms which are an excellent study tool. Not to mention exams are multiple choice so if you are prone to making silly errors, chances are you'll notice right away when your answer's not an option :P The first mid term for calc is limits and differentiations. Applications are on the first term final. Integration is taught in second term.

Physics - I've heard mixed feelings. I've personally never taken physics in high school so I'm taking the intro to physics instead of biophysics. A lot of bio med majors/modules in third year require biophysics so do your research ahead of time. I've heard many mixed reviews. The majority will say DO NOT TAKE BIOPHYSICS ZINKE IS SATAN! But I've also heard that exams are open book, tests are online, and in terms of tests everyone gathers their laptops together and does the tests together. Also, everyone fails the exams but ends up with 80's. Intro to physics is just the usual physics with the math and stuff. Biophysics is all about movement and what not whereas intro to physics is like machines and all that stuff.

Chemistry - A lot of high school review at first but come second term everyone is screwed over. The second term midterm this year averaged about a 53% I believe, and that's because 2 people got 100% whereas everyone else essentially failed. The students were literally wondering why on earth they studied and how on earth the professors came up with these questions. They suggest really getting to know your equilibrium stuff now before it bites you next year because it only gets worse.

Biology - You don't pick your prof, I think there's only one. You can choose what specific biology course, whether plants or cells or what. I haven't looked much into this but it wasn't my biggest concern I suppose. I haven't heard anything bad about biology, only that it's 100% knowledge based, a more in-depth version of what we learn in Biology 12.

I don't know anything about the labs or tutorials unfortunately, or what a schedule would be like (other than BUSY!) There's a fantastic science student council though and lots of guidance when it comes to planning out your courses in future years and what path you'll take, etc. One thing I've heard for sure though is that you can come out with a great experience and good grades from western bio med (unlike at queens or mac where you'll kill yourself doing work for no gain).

That's pretty much all I know. If you have any questions, I can do my best to answer based off what I know. Also I've stayed over for multiple weekends and western is just freaking awesome. And the bio med students really do seem to love it (aside from that one chem mid term!) Also there's tons of information on the website about all the classes, modules and requirements and if this was posted sooner I would highly suggest going to open house! The only difference between bio med and general sciences is that if you apply for bio med out of high school you just have to maintain the required 78% average of bio, chem, math, 60% in physics and you need to pass your elective. At the end of first or second year and you're in general sciences, you can apply to be in bio med. That's the only difference. I think there might actually still be some sort of minimal application process for people who get accepted right out of high school.

See, with all this extensive research on this program, I'll be REALLY damn disappointed if I don't get in! :P



you my friend, are dedicated
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A photo of McMuffins McMuffins
I got mine way back in January with an average of 88 (Damn Caluclus). I live in BC and I applied in December.
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