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Biomedical Engineering Programs

A photo of brady23 brady23
Hey guys,

I plan on going into biomedical engineering, particularly the biomechanics side of it.

I really want to go to McMaster or Queen's, but McMaster offers an Electrical & Biomedical Engineering program, but Electrical Engineering is the last type of engineering I want to go into.

Queen's offers a minor in Biomedical Engineering w/ Chemical Engineering, and I don't want to go into Chemical Engineering either.

Is there any way I can just do the biomedical engineering credits with another degree like life science at McMaster and Queen's? Or are Queen's & McMaster planning to do Biomedical & Mechanical Engineering together or offer Biomedical Engineering as a separate discipline? I couldn't find anything on the internet.

Otherwise, my only options are Ryerson or Guelph, since Mcgill, Waterloo, Ottawa, and Carleton are too far, and I don't want to do Engineering Science at UofT because I have to wait 2 years before doing anything.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
If your interested in biomedical engineering (especially biomechanics) IMO your better off going into mechanical and specializing in biomedical. You likely will need a grad degree for biomedical engineering type work. This way it also opens doors for other options if you change your mind (it happens).
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A photo of brady23 brady23

@pj2121 wrote
If your interested in biomedical engineering (especially biomechanics) IMO your better off going into mechanical and specializing in biomedical. You likely will need a grad degree for biomedical engineering type work. This way it also opens doors for other options if you change your mind (it happens).



Yeah, but then the number of biology electives would be limited, which is why I'm set in doing a biomedical engineering undergraduate degree. Mechanical Engineering wouldn't allow me to take as many biology courses as I would like.
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A photo of ktel ktel
None of the engineering disciplines will let you take a ton of biology courses, it's engineering, it's jam packed already. I don't know of any schools that offer biomed as a separate discipline rather than a minor/specialization.
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A photo of CatRunner CatRunner
I have friends here at Guelph studying both biological and biomedical engineering. They love, love, love their programs. Guelph's program is also very well known among those in the biomedical engineering field - graduates have gone on to study at Harvard, MIT, as well as many Canadian grad schools. Check out some of the alumuni profiles here, and you will see that Guelph is well-recognized: http://www.soe.uoguelph.ca/careers/alumni_profile_bio.html

My friends in co-op here at Guelph got great jobs, beating out students from supposedly "top" engineering schools like U of Waterloo or U of T. So Guelph is definitely well-known to employers in the field.

You will get to take a fair number of biology-related electives at Guelph. Everyone I know who is in the program really, really enjoys it. My friends here at Guelph also say that they really like the emphasis on design: they take an engineering design course in each of their four years, unlike a lot of engineering programs that just have a design project in your final year.

In the biomedical program at Guelph you will take a lot of biology courses and electives as well as all the "regular" engineering courses. The biology courses include:
http://www.uoguelph.ca/registrar/calendars/undergraduate/current/c10/c10beng-bme.shtml
BIOL*1080 [0.50] Biological Concepts of Health
BIOL*1090 [0.50] Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology
BIOM*2000 [0.50] Concepts in Human Physiology
BIOM*3010 [0.50] Comparative Mammalian Anatomy
ENGG*3170 [0.50] Biomaterials
PATH*3610 [0.50] Principles of Disease
ENGG*4390 [0.75] Bio-instrumentation Design
ENGG*4180 [1.00] Biomedical Engineering Design IV

And then you will have a bunch of biomedical engineering electives that have to be taken from a list of courses, as well as your complementary electives. You can check out the program guide that lists all these electives here:
http://www.uoguelph.ca/engineering/sites/default/files/ProgramGuide20102011UPDATE.pdf

Among the biology electives you can choose from are:
Introductory Biochemistry, F/W (P) Principles of Pharmacology, W (P)
Occupational Biomechanics and Ergonomics, W (M)
Biomechanics of Injury and Disease, W (M) Biological Nanomaterials, F (P)(S) Principles of Toxicology, F (P)

As part of your "social issues" complementary elective, you can also take courses with a biological flavour, such as Nutrition and Society, Human Development, or Philosophy of Medicine.

Guelph is a great school, and all of my friends in the program (either biological engineering or biomedical engineering) really love it here!
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A photo of CatRunner CatRunner

@ktel wrote
None of the engineering disciplines will let you take a ton of biology courses, it's engineering, it's jam packed already. I don't know of any schools that offer biomed as a separate discipline rather than a minor/specialization.



Guelph offers both biomedical and biological engineering as separate disciplines. They have had grads go on to study at MIT and Harvard, and have students who have won top scholarships. So the programs are very well known among those who matter in the biological or biomedical engineering fields.
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A photo of brady23 brady23
Thanks for all this great information! I was looking at the graduate programs for biomedical engineering at McMaster, UBC, etc. and it states that an undergraduate in life science is fine.

I really would prefer doing a life science degree and then doing biomedical engineering as a graduate degree, but that would mean I would have no engineering knowledge whatsoever. :S Wouldn't that put me at a severe disadvantage?
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A photo of ktel ktel
Dabbling in the biomed field myself at the moment, I would say it's probably better to get the engineering knowledge first and then pick up the biology knowledge. That's just me, and the way I've done it, however.
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