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Biomedical Engineering

A photo of brady23 brady23
Hey guys, I'm really fascinated by Biomedical Engineering, but I hear it is just a research field.

I'm more interested in making mechanical devices related to health like artificial hearts and organs, and working with hospital equipment.

How likely is it that I will find a career in biomedical engineering that suits my interests? Is it just a research field?

And is Ryerson or Ottawa or Carleton good universities for biomedical engineering? Carleton and Ottawa have coop, not sure about Ryerson.
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A photo of ktel ktel
You typically need to go to grad school to get into the Biomedical Engineering field. Mostly because you can't learn enough in the 4.5-5 year time span that your undergrad degree takes. So while you would have to do a research degree after, you don't necessarily need to work in research.

I'm going into Aerospace Engineering but my last two research projects have had a biomedical aspect to them. For one project I worked with the Institute for Reconstructive Sciences in Medicine and they had some really cool things you could do if you worked there. They mostly make prototypes of anything imagineable for surgeons to practice on (so taking a CT scan and making a model of the patient's mouth, or jaw bone, or whatever). They had an industrial designer working there to build a lot of the prototypes. For my current project we're working a lot with the Clinical Engineering department at the hospital, and from my understanding they keep medical equipment up and running and other stuff like that. You could also work for any company that makes medical devices. So kind of research-y but still what I think you would find interesting.
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A photo of brady23 brady23

@ktel wrote
You typically need to go to grad school to get into the Biomedical Engineering field. Mostly because you can't learn enough in the 4.5-5 year time span that your undergrad degree takes. So while you would have to do a research degree after, you don't necessarily need to work in research.

I'm going into Aerospace Engineering but my last two research projects have had a biomedical aspect to them. For one project I worked with the Institute for Reconstructive Sciences in Medicine and they had some really cool things you could do if you worked there. They mostly make prototypes of anything imagineable for surgeons to practice on (so taking a CT scan and making a model of the patient's mouth, or jaw bone, or whatever). They had an industrial designer working there to build a lot of the prototypes. For my current project we're working a lot with the Clinical Engineering department at the hospital, and from my understanding they keep medical equipment up and running and other stuff like that. You could also work for any company that makes medical devices. So kind of research-y but still what I think you would find interesting.



Wow! Thanks for the detailed response! Is it likely that I will find a job with a company that makes medical devices? And working with the hospital and keeping the equipment working would also be cool. But the job market for these types are low right?
And do you know if Ryerson has a respectable biomedical engineering program?
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A photo of ktel ktel
The job market is small, yes, but I have no idea what the likelihood of getting a job is, so unfortunately can't help you there.

I also don't know much about Ryerson's biomedical program. I can say that engineering programs at most universities are fairly comparable in quality. As you will most likely need some research experience, why not take a look at the professors and what sort of research they do, to see if that would fit with helping you reach your goals.
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A photo of Quiz Quiz
I think it would be a better idea to not get too specialized too early on since you may end up changing your mind about your education/career path. Start in a more general program such as mechanical or electrical engineering (any university will do). When you move into gradtuate studies, you will have a clearer idea of what you would like to do/where you would like to study.

Quiz.
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A photo of CatRunner CatRunner
According to my friends who are studying either biological or biomedical engineering here at Guelph, it is definitely not just a research field. They've told me about some of the design projects that the engineering students work on, and they've included things like designing a reverse osmosis water purification unit for their second year design course, and prosthetics and various medical devices for their fourth year final design project.

You can check out some of their design courses here: http://www.soe.uoguelph.ca/Design/design.htm

and past projects here:
http://www.soe.uoguelph.ca/Design/projectlist.htm
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A photo of ktel ktel
Quiz has a good point. You can get into biomed with just a plain Mechanical degree (as I am currently doing). Although I do wish I could remember a little more biology, I have picked up what I need to know pretty fast.
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A photo of IronMan IronMan
UofT offer the Biomedical engineering major as part of the engineering science curriculum! why don't you check that it may help !

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UofT Engineering Science 1T5
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A photo of Quiz Quiz

@IronMan wrote
UofT offer the Biomedical engineering major as part of the engineering science curriculum! why don't you check that it may help !

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UofT Engineering Science 1T5


The world does not revolve around UofT engineering science. Open your mind.
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