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A photo of zaidpass zaidpass
Can you guys please help me out? I have focused my high school courses in sciences and math so I don't know much about business but I applied to schulich just in case and I got in. Now I am leaning towards it but I don't know what I can do with my iBBA degree.

What type of careers are there and how much pay will I get paid in the different types of jobs.
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A photo of immaculatedx immaculatedx
Here's a career report for Schulich.

http://www.schulich.yorku.ca//SSB-Extra/careers.nsf/Lookup/2010%20BBA%20Graduate%20Survey/$file/2010%20BBA%20Graduate%20Survey.pdf
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A photo of zaidpass zaidpass
That was helpful, but 89% students getting jobs was kind of a turn off. I would expect more
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A photo of g93 g93
89% of students within 3 months is pretty good.
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A photo of zaidpass zaidpass

@g93 wrote
89% of students within 3 months is pretty good.



Is it? I don't know , I researched more into engineering and I found out waterloo's job ratio is like 98%. UofT's is really high too for engineering. So I was basing on that
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A photo of kiddinaround kiddinaround

@zaidpass wrote

@g93 wrote
89% of students within 3 months is pretty good.



Is it? I don't know , I researched more into engineering and I found out waterloo's job ratio is like 98%. UofT's is really high too for engineering. So I was basing on that



How current are the numbers (I am very skeptical of universities reporting their own employment numbers to begin with)

If 89% is accurate, then that is amazing considering we are in a recession.
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A photo of goldmansachs goldmansachs

@kiddinaround wrote

If 89% is accurate, then that is amazing considering we are in a recession.


Yep

In the past it has been 91-92%, only went down because of the recession. I expect it to go back up to the low-90s, as we are in the "recovery" process.
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A photo of GoBarca GoBarca

@zaidpass wrote
That was helpful, but 89% students getting jobs was kind of a turn off. I would expect more



you are funny.
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@zaidpass wrote

@g93 wrote
89% of students within 3 months is pretty good.



Is it? I don't know , I researched more into engineering and I found out waterloo's job ratio is like 98%. UofT's is really high too for engineering. So I was basing on that




You're comparing business with engineering. Engineering is fucking hard, resulting in high drop out rates and very good employment numbers. Schulich, if I remember correctly, had a really, really low drop out rate (due to lenient grade requirements and a bell curve), resulting in a lot of graduates and not so impressive employment numbers.
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A photo of waazup waazup

@IanSharer wrote

@zaidpass wrote

@g93 wrote
89% of students within 3 months is pretty good.



Is it? I don't know , I researched more into engineering and I found out waterloo's job ratio is like 98%. UofT's is really high too for engineering. So I was basing on that




You're comparing business with engineering. Engineering is fucking hard, resulting in high drop out rates and very good employment numbers. Schulich, if I remember correctly, had a really, really low drop out rate (due to lenient grade requirements and a bell curve), resulting in a lot of graduates and not so impressive employment numbers.



Wait, what? Schulich is just has hard as engineering. They don't really compare, but business is not easy, in a school like Schulich.
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A photo of LeafsFan16 LeafsFan16

@waazup wrote

@IanSharer wrote

@zaidpass wrote

@g93 wrote
89% of students within 3 months is pretty good.



Is it? I don't know , I researched more into engineering and I found out waterloo's job ratio is like 98%. UofT's is really high too for engineering. So I was basing on that




You're comparing business with engineering. Engineering is fucking hard, resulting in high drop out rates and very good employment numbers. Schulich, if I remember correctly, had a really, really low drop out rate (due to lenient grade requirements and a bell curve), resulting in a lot of graduates and not so impressive employment numbers.



Wait, what? Schulich is just has hard as engineering. They don't really compare, but business is not easy, in a school like Schulich.



No one is saying business is easy, but engineering is the hardest undergrad university program by far. Like Ian said, there is a high dropout rate and the workload is insane, it is harder for someone to screw up in business than screw up in engineering. Because of the difficulty of the program and the lower number of graduates, there are plenty of opportunities available and engineers don't have much trouble finding jobs. For business though, there's so many degrees from numerous universities and colleges and generally it is not that hard to stay in the program unless you totally screw off. There's also more electives in business while with engineering there are a lot of science and math prerequisites which are difficult.

Trust me, I know quite a few people in both programs at various universities and more often than not the engineering kids are dying while the business kids can at least somewhat manage.
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@waazup wrote

@IanSharer wrote

@zaidpass wrote

@g93 wrote
89% of students within 3 months is pretty good.



Is it? I don't know , I researched more into engineering and I found out waterloo's job ratio is like 98%. UofT's is really high too for engineering. So I was basing on that




You're comparing business with engineering. Engineering is fucking hard, resulting in high drop out rates and very good employment numbers. Schulich, if I remember correctly, had a really, really low drop out rate (due to lenient grade requirements and a bell curve), resulting in a lot of graduates and not so impressive employment numbers.



Wait, what? Schulich is just has hard as engineering. They don't really compare, but business is not easy, in a school like Schulich.



No it isn't... No business program is as hard as engineering. While Schulich might not be a walk in the park, it certainly isn't hard to graduate as evident in their low drop out rates.
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A photo of Yaroslav64 Yaroslav64
Engineering you have to take 6 courses a term with only 1 elective and thats if your lucky, business you take 5 courses a term with a varying amount of electives. /conversation.
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A photo of Rela Rela
I love how waazup keeps posting even though he has no clue what he's saying.
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A photo of waazup waazup

@IanSharer wrote

@waazup wrote

@IanSharer wrote

@zaidpass wrote

@g93 wrote
89% of students within 3 months is pretty good.



Is it? I don't know , I researched more into engineering and I found out waterloo's job ratio is like 98%. UofT's is really high too for engineering. So I was basing on that




You're comparing business with engineering. Engineering is fucking hard, resulting in high drop out rates and very good employment numbers. Schulich, if I remember correctly, had a really, really low drop out rate (due to lenient grade requirements and a bell curve), resulting in a lot of graduates and not so impressive employment numbers.



Wait, what? Schulich is just has hard as engineering. They don't really compare, but business is not easy, in a school like Schulich.



No it isn't... No business program is as hard as engineering. While Schulich might not be a walk in the park, it certainly isn't hard to graduate as evident in their low drop out rates.



I don't know, but maybe it might be because of the type of people that get in. For engineering, generally an 80+ gets you in a good school. Although for top tier business, a 90+ is only acceptable. These students tend not to drop out, while the ones in the 80s drop out because they can't handle the heavy work load. I think this may be a major factor too.

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A photo of waazup waazup

@Rela wrote
I love how waazup keeps posting even though he has no clue what he's saying.



Are you forreal, I totally know what I am saying. Point out one flaw. Next time don't jump to conclusions.
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A photo of nazarus nazarus
There is no question here, engineering is much, much harder.

For example, first year engineering students spend up to 30hrs/week in classes, while business students will never go past 20hrs/week.
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@waazup wrote
I don't know, but maybe it might be because of the type of people that get in. For engineering, generally an 80+ gets you in a good school. Although for top tier business, a 90+ is only acceptable. These students tend not to drop out, while the ones in the 80s drop out because they can't handle the heavy work load. I think this may be a major factor too.



I don't know why I keep replying to a troll, but in case anyone actually thought it that way: A business student getting a 90 is not as impressive as an engineering student getting a 90.

For a large majority of business hopefuls, their courses would include things like economics, advanced functions, accounting, and probably two bird courses. Any keener can get a 90% average with those courses. Now, an engineering hopeful would most likely have taken all three sciences, advanced functions, calculus and english. The reason why lots of engineering programs have cutoffs in the 80s is because it's much harder given the prerequisites and the courses that are generally taken by those who have an interest in it.

Let's just put it this way: While there are exceptions, engineering entails the hardest workload, the highest drop outs, and probably the best job security. Comparing engineering employment statistics to business (in general) is stupid.
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A photo of g93 g93
Waazup: listen to nazarus and IanSharer (posts 17 and 18)

/End thread
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A photo of waazup waazup

@IanSharer wrote

@waazup wrote
I don't know, but maybe it might be because of the type of people that get in. For engineering, generally an 80+ gets you in a good school. Although for top tier business, a 90+ is only acceptable. These students tend not to drop out, while the ones in the 80s drop out because they can't handle the heavy work load. I think this may be a major factor too.



I don't know why I keep replying to a troll, but in case anyone actually thought it that way: A business student getting a 90 is not as impressive as an engineering student getting a 90.

For a large majority of business hopefuls, their courses would include things like economics, advanced functions, accounting, and probably two bird courses. Any keener can get a 90% average with those courses. Now, an engineering hopeful would most likely have taken all three sciences, advanced functions, calculus and english. The reason why lots of engineering programs have cutoffs in the 80s is because it's much harder given the prerequisites and the courses that are generally taken by those who have an interest in it.

Let's just put it this way: While there are exceptions, engineering entails the hardest workload, the highest drop outs, and probably the best job security. Comparing engineering employment statistics to business (in general) is stupid.




Omg, no, no, no, no no.

A business "hopeful" will probably take Eng, Calc, Adv. F, Econ, + 2 other U/M courses.
An engineering "hopeful" would probably take Eng, Calc, Adv. F, Physics, Chem + 1 other U/M course. No, they won't take bio, hardly anyone takes it (only med students usually). But for engineering, no one wants to get into that stuff in gr.12.

Secondly, Physics might seem as hard, so might chem, depends on schools. Econ is also just as hard, you gotta write essays, etc. In the end it IS a U course, but yes, Chem or Physics is probably harder.

I DO agree with you, as I also believed earlier, The gr. 12 high school courses for an engineering school WILL be harder - but it does not compare to a 80 vs 90.

You tell me, how hard is it to keep a 78-83 average in all the subjects and still get into a proper engineering school. But how hard is it to keep all/most your subjects above 90? That's hard.

I am PRETTY sure that a 94 avg. going for business does not compare with an 84 avg. going into engineering...more so like an 88 average. The amount of work that 94 avg. will put into his courses is a lot, alot - whereas the 88 average will do enough to just touch a 90. There IS a difference man, trust me, I may seem like a minor but I can see it from the people in my grade.

To those who think I am a troll, go ahead as you wish. Yes, I may act like I know everything but I don't, I can admit it. Of course I have a lot to learn but all of my arguments are not meant to be considered as troll posts...jeez, you are only 1 year older than me, perhaps some months, so do not go on thinking I am such a minor...Damn!

Edit: Why the F are we even talking about this, who cares, I know engineering is harder, but you make it sound like it's extremely hard. Only the best ones are harder, and generally they are all harder than basic business programs...
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@waazup wrote
Omg, no, no, no, no no.

A business "hopeful" will probably take Eng, Calc, Adv. F, Econ, + 2 other U/M courses.
An engineering "hopeful" would probably take Eng, Calc, Adv. F, Physics, Chem + 1 other U/M course. No, they won't take bio, hardly anyone takes it (only med students usually). But for engineering, no one wants to get into that stuff in gr.12.

Secondly, Physics might seem as hard, so might chem, depends on schools. Econ is also just as hard, you gotta write essays, etc. In the end it IS a U course, but yes, Chem or Physics is probably harder.

I DO agree with you, as I also believed earlier, The gr. 12 high school courses for an engineering school WILL be harder - but it does not compare to a 80 vs 90.

You tell me, how hard is it to keep a 78-83 average in all the subjects and still get into a proper engineering school. But how hard is it to keep all/most your subjects above 90? That's hard.

I am PRETTY sure that a 94 avg. going for business does not compare with an 84 avg. going into engineering...more so like an 88 average. The amount of work that 94 avg. will put into his courses is a lot, alot - whereas the 88 average will do enough to just touch a 90. There IS a difference man, trust me, I may seem like a minor but I can see it from the people in my grade.

To those who think I am a troll, go ahead as you wish. Yes, I may act like I know everything but I don't, I can admit it. Of course I have a lot to learn but all of my arguments are not meant to be considered as troll posts...jeez, you are only 1 year older than me, perhaps some months, so do not go on thinking I am such a minor...Damn!

Edit: Why the F are we even talking about this, who cares, I know engineering is harder, but you make it sound like it's extremely hard. Only the best ones are harder, and generally they are all harder than basic business programs...




Bottom line, engineering is hard. You have no grounds to disregard it. Business courses in high school are a joke. Believe what you want about everything else, you'll get a reality check soon enough.
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A photo of Yaroslav64 Yaroslav64

@waazup wrote

@IanSharer wrote

@waazup wrote
I don't know, but maybe it might be because of the type of people that get in. For engineering, generally an 80+ gets you in a good school. Although for top tier business, a 90+ is only acceptable. These students tend not to drop out, while the ones in the 80s drop out because they can't handle the heavy work load. I think this may be a major factor too.



I don't know why I keep replying to a troll, but in case anyone actually thought it that way: A business student getting a 90 is not as impressive as an engineering student getting a 90.

For a large majority of business hopefuls, their courses would include things like economics, advanced functions, accounting, and probably two bird courses. Any keener can get a 90% average with those courses. Now, an engineering hopeful would most likely have taken all three sciences, advanced functions, calculus and english. The reason why lots of engineering programs have cutoffs in the 80s is because it's much harder given the prerequisites and the courses that are generally taken by those who have an interest in it.

Let's just put it this way: While there are exceptions, engineering entails the hardest workload, the highest drop outs, and probably the best job security. Comparing engineering employment statistics to business (in general) is stupid.




Omg, no, no, no, no no.

A business "hopeful" will probably take Eng, Calc, Adv. F, Econ, + 2 other U/M courses.
An engineering "hopeful" would probably take Eng, Calc, Adv. F, Physics, Chem + 1 other U/M course. No, they won't take bio, hardly anyone takes it (only med students usually). But for engineering, no one wants to get into that stuff in gr.12.

Secondly, Physics might seem as hard, so might chem, depends on schools. Econ is also just as hard, you gotta write essays, etc. In the end it IS a U course, but yes, Chem or Physics is probably harder.

I DO agree with you, as I also believed earlier, The gr. 12 high school courses for an engineering school WILL be harder - but it does not compare to a 80 vs 90.

You tell me, how hard is it to keep a 78-83 average in all the subjects and still get into a proper engineering school. But how hard is it to keep all/most your subjects above 90? That's hard.

I am PRETTY sure that a 94 avg. going for business does not compare with an 84 avg. going into engineering...more so like an 88 average. The amount of work that 94 avg. will put into his courses is a lot, alot - whereas the 88 average will do enough to just touch a 90. There IS a difference man, trust me, I may seem like a minor but I can see it from the people in my grade.

To those who think I am a troll, go ahead as you wish. Yes, I may act like I know everything but I don't, I can admit it. Of course I have a lot to learn but all of my arguments are not meant to be considered as troll posts...jeez, you are only 1 year older than me, perhaps some months, so do not go on thinking I am such a minor...Damn!

Edit: Why the F are we even talking about this, who cares, I know engineering is harder, but you make it sound like it's extremely hard. Only the best ones are harder, and generally they are all harder than basic business programs...



Couple points, most business students dont take calculus, atleast at my school. Out of the 25 person calculus class I'm in 2 people are going into business, almost 100% of the people in the data management course are going into business. Secondly my friends who take economics and accounting TELL me they're bird courses, and this is coming from guys that dropped chemistry in the first 2 weeks because they realized it would be too hard. Most of my friends going into business have similiar classes to this.

English
Data Management
Film Studies/ Media Studies
Advanced Functions
Religion
World Issues/Accounting/economics
Business

I guarantee if we took the people in my physics class and put them in business classes their averages would go up by atleast 5 precent, and thats being conservative. I'll even give you an example, a friend of mine was pretty set on being a doctor, then decided business was for him. He took biology, chemistry, physics in grade 11 and he had an average in the low 80's. This year he took business, world issues, and accounting and he has a 90 average and thats without taking business or accounting in grade 11.

The university's dont set a magical precentile you need to reach to get in they go by applicants and its obvious business applicants are getting better grades, does this mean they are smarter? Hell no.
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A photo of Sefear Sefear

Couple points, most business students dont take calculus, atleast at my school. Out of the 25 person calculus class I'm in 2 people are going into business, almost 100% of the people in the data management course are going into business. Secondly my friends who take economics and accounting TELL me they're bird courses, and this is coming from guys that dropped chemistry in the first 2 weeks because they realized it would be too hard. Most of my friends going into business have similiar classes to this.

English
Data Management
Film Studies/ Media Studies
Advanced Functions
Religion
World Issues/Accounting/economics
Business

I guarantee if we took the people in my physics class and put them in business classes their averages would go up by atleast 5 precent, and thats being conservative. I'll even give you an example, a friend of mine was pretty set on being a doctor, then decided business was for him. He took biology, chemistry, physics in grade 11 and he had an average in the low 80's. This year he took business, world issues, and accounting and he has a 90 average and thats without taking business or accounting in grade 11.

The university's dont set a magical precentile you need to reach to get in they go by applicants and its obvious business applicants are getting better grades, does this mean they are smarter? Hell no



Agreed 100% and I'm one of those guys he's talking about taking econ, accounting and business. Those classes are easy as hell compared to my functions class. ps was that Barry who wanted to be a doctor?
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A photo of Yaroslav64 Yaroslav64

@Sefear wrote

Couple points, most business students dont take calculus, atleast at my school. Out of the 25 person calculus class I'm in 2 people are going into business, almost 100% of the people in the data management course are going into business. Secondly my friends who take economics and accounting TELL me they're bird courses, and this is coming from guys that dropped chemistry in the first 2 weeks because they realized it would be too hard. Most of my friends going into business have similiar classes to this.

English
Data Management
Film Studies/ Media Studies
Advanced Functions
Religion
World Issues/Accounting/economics
Business

I guarantee if we took the people in my physics class and put them in business classes their averages would go up by atleast 5 precent, and thats being conservative. I'll even give you an example, a friend of mine was pretty set on being a doctor, then decided business was for him. He took biology, chemistry, physics in grade 11 and he had an average in the low 80's. This year he took business, world issues, and accounting and he has a 90 average and thats without taking business or accounting in grade 11.

The university's dont set a magical precentile you need to reach to get in they go by applicants and its obvious business applicants are getting better grades, does this mean they are smarter? Hell no



Agreed 100% and I'm one of those guys he's talking about taking econ, accounting and business. Those classes are easy as hell compared to my functions class. ps was that Barry who wanted to be a doctor?



I think he wanted to go into kines' then go to med school after that but I could be wrong. I was just making a point.
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