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I know that most of guys on here are set on going into mostly the Finance of Accounting sector of business. And I know that "Management" isn't something you necessarily go into because nobody starts off as a manager, but, what's a good focus if you want to be a high level business executive?
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A photo of g93 g93
That is why I one of the reasons I am going into accounting: 62% of Canada's 500 largest corporations have at least one CA in one of the upper-level management positions (CEO, CFO, COO, President, etc.)
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer
You'll either need a professional designation, a reputable MBA or some great work experience (most likely more than 1 of those).

Examples:

Undergrad --> Work in a good firm --> Professional designation --> Move up with experience

Undergrad --> Work in a good firm --> MBA from a top school --> Move up with experience

Undergrad --> Work in a good firm (and in a good field, such as investment banking or management consulting) --> Move up with experience

The latter wouldn't work for all fields unless you have great talent.
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@IanSharer wrote
You'll either need a professional designation, a reputable MBA or some great work experience (most likely more than 1 of those).

Examples:

Undergrad --> Work in a good firm --> Professional designation --> Move up with experience

Undergrad --> Work in a good firm --> MBA from a top school --> Move up with experience

Undergrad --> Work in a good firm (and in a good field, such as investment banking or management consulting) --> Move up with experience

The latter wouldn't work for all fields unless you have great talent.



Bottom line, (for example,) being a CA and having an MBA from a Top School would guarantee you the best odds (on top of the basics of networking and having a good rep and such)?
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@cbonnie wrote

@IanSharer wrote
You'll either need a professional designation, a reputable MBA or some great work experience (most likely more than 1 of those).

Examples:

Undergrad --> Work in a good firm --> Professional designation --> Move up with experience

Undergrad --> Work in a good firm --> MBA from a top school --> Move up with experience

Undergrad --> Work in a good firm (and in a good field, such as investment banking or management consulting) --> Move up with experience

The latter wouldn't work for all fields unless you have great talent.



Bottom line, (for example,) being a CA and having an MBA from a Top School would guarantee you the best odds (on top of the basics of networking and having a good rep and such)?



An MBA won't always help. An MBA from Wharton or HBS will most likely.

I would definitely recommend something like CA + MBA, or CMA + CFA, or DD + MBA, CA + CFA....
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer

@cbonnie wrote
Bottom line, (for example,) being a CA and having an MBA from a Top School would guarantee you the best odds (on top of the basics of networking and having a good rep and such)?



That's not necessary, to be honest. Your employability are only worth as much as your past experience. If a manager at Deloitte were looking for a new job, employers would care more about his past experience and couldn't give two shits how many degrees and designations he holds. That isn't to say they're useless, but a MBA/professional designation isn't a free ticket for a job nor is it something that will give you much of an edge over someone with, wait for it...actual ability.
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@IanSharer wrote

@cbonnie wrote
Bottom line, (for example,) being a CA and having an MBA from a Top School would guarantee you the best odds (on top of the basics of networking and having a good rep and such)?



That's not necessary, to be honest. Your employability are only worth as much as your past experience. If a manager at Deloitte were looking for a new job, employers would care more about his past experience and couldn't give two craps how many degrees and designations he holds. That isn't to say they're useless, but a MBA/professional designation isn't a free ticket for a job nor is it something that will give you much of an edge over someone with, wait for it...actual ability.



Whoops my bad :X I know what you mean, they don't just want an employee who has the book smarts proven by their degrees. I guess they're just only as effective as the amount of valuable experience you have?
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@junior21 wrote
Question... Once I finish my undergrad and get my CA designation, what happens next?

Will I need to find a job, go for my CFA or apply somewhere for my MBA?

Also what determines if you get accepted for your MBA?


You might want to try working after you get your CA.

CFA you need finance-related work. Check wallstreetoasis for more info.

MBA is mostly work experience, and then GMAT scores, a competitive GPA (top schools usually as long as you are 3.6, 3.7+ it doesn't make a difference) and then your usual ECs, volunteer, and supps.
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A photo of CityBoy CityBoy
I don't know which type of comapnies your talking about but if you want to work at reputable companies like GS, JPM, PwC, P&G, Deloitte, BCG, and so on.. to be an executive.. you have to be really smart for one!

But lol I suggest getting an MBA from a top 25 school in the states.. Canada won't do you any good trust me. When I say getting an MBA from a top school in the states.. I don't mean just Havard, Wharton or Stanford.. try like Booth at Chicago or Stern at like NYU. If you take a look at the CEO of all the largest investment banks in America, you will see an Harvard MBA for sure.. even CEO of TD has a degree from Harvard.

That's for like TOP TOP companies..

but decent for decent places I know some people that just have their CA but they worked their way up.. uhm I can't give you example from my family buut how about like Ian Clarke he is VP and CFO of Maple Leafs Ltd. with just a CA?

To rise at the top you don't only have to be smart, or have a good degree or work experience, you have to be really lucky!

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A photo of applekid applekid

@g93 wrote
That is why I one of the reasons I am going into accounting: 62% of Canada's 500 largest corporations have at least one CA in one of the upper-level management positions (CEO, CFO, COO, President, etc.)


And probably even more have at least 1 marketing major, and at least 1 finance major, and at least 1 human resources major. Nothing special there.

If you want to become a high level manager, do whatever you enjoy doing. Sounds cheesy I know, but realistically you don't even need a business degree to become a CEO. Many CEO's have a engineering degree, were in IT or were lawyers.
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A photo of JCP JCP
Accountants come into our accounting classes and boast about how top executives are all accountants and how it is not just numbers.

This is true, but the designation is not a quick way to get into this position. It takes years upon years to achieve such a position, and in those years you will be slugging it out in the accounting department doing all the things you thought you would be avoiding. Also, you will be sitting there with all the other over-achieving kids that were inspired by the same presentation that told them they could rule the world with a CA designation.

Dont get me wrong, it is extremely useful and reputable in the business world, but you have to like the accounting part of the job. If you are shooting for the top and want to avoid the number crunching then an MBA is definitely more suited for you in my opinion.

An MBA and a CA is a lot of schooling in one shot. Some companies will pay for you to get your MBA while working for them, which is a huge advantage. It is easier to get an MBA if you have a CA or CGA than it is to go and get an accounting designation from an MBA or undergrad that majors in something other than accounting, simply because there are specific courses you would have to retake.

This is just a culmination of everything I have researched about the subject, all of it is open for discussion.
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@CityBoy wrote
I don't know which type of comapnies your talking about but if you want to work at reputable companies like GS, JPM, PwC, P&G, Deloitte, BCG, and so on.. to be an executive.. you have to be really smart for one!

But lol I suggest getting an MBA from a top 25 school in the states.. Canada won't do you any good trust me. When I say getting an MBA from a top school in the states.. I don't mean just Havard, Wharton or Stanford.. try like Booth at Chicago or Stern at like NYU. If you take a look at the CEO of all the largest investment banks in America, you will see an Harvard MBA for sure.. even CEO of TD has a degree from Harvard.

That's for like TOP TOP companies..

but decent for decent places I know some people that just have their CA but they worked their way up.. uhm I can't give you example from my family buut how about like Ian Clarke he is VP and CFO of Maple Leafs Ltd. with just a CA?

To rise at the top you don't only have to be smart, or have a good degree or work experience, you have to be really lucky!





Well it would definitely be my ultimate goal be reach such a position at a TOP TOP company. But realistically :P, for now, I was just talking about pretty decent firms/companies. And yeah, after reading stuff on these forums and College Confidential, I think that an MBA from an Ivy has much precedence over one from like UofT because most people don't really go for MBAs anyways.

I think although being smart/lucky/experienced is part of it, timing is probably a big factor in it too. Yeah those CEOs, they got it all ;) Tis why they get the $$
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@JCP wrote
Accountants come into our accounting classes and boast about how top executives are all accountants and how it is not just numbers.

This is true, but the designation is not a quick way to get into this position. It takes years upon years to achieve such a position, and in those years you will be slugging it out in the accounting department doing all the things you thought you would be avoiding. Also, you will be sitting there with all the other over-achieving kids that were inspired by the same presentation that told them they could rule the world with a CA designation.

Dont get me wrong, it is extremely useful and reputable in the business world, but you have to like the accounting part of the job. If you are shooting for the top and want to avoid the number crunching then an MBA is definitely more suited for you in my opinion.

An MBA and a CA is a lot of schooling in one shot. Some companies will pay for you to get your MBA while working for them, which is a huge advantage. It is easier to get an MBA if you have a CA or CGA than it is to go and get an accounting designation from an MBA or undergrad that majors in something other than accounting, simply because there are specific courses you would have to retake.

This is just a culmination of everything I have researched about the subject, all of it is open for discussion.



+1
You make a good point,I guess,to each his own. :) Personally, I think I'm just going to go for an MBA somewhere prestigious, because I really don't like the meticulous nitty gritty details of accounting.
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@applekid wrote

@g93 wrote
That is why I one of the reasons I am going into accounting: 62% of Canada's 500 largest corporations have at least one CA in one of the upper-level management positions (CEO, CFO, COO, President, etc.)


And probably even more have at least 1 marketing major, and at least 1 finance major, and at least 1 human resources major. Nothing special there.

If you want to become a high level manager, do whatever you enjoy doing. Sounds cheesy I know, but realistically you don't even need a business degree to become a CEO. Many CEO's have a engineering degree, were in IT or were lawyers.

ypically the ones with engineering degrees have an MBA.

CA is just one designation that you can get from accounting, there is also CGA and CMA. So that adds to the amount. 62% is quite high. Add in the execs who were self-made with no degrees, the ones with other degrees, and between those and the ones with CAs or other designations and there's not much room left. Sure some will have other degrees. But the good thing about a CA is you can step away and try to make the $193k average.
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A photo of g93 g93

@JCP wrote
Accountants come into our accounting classes and boast about how top executives are all accountants and how it is not just numbers.

This is true, but the designation is not a quick way to get into this position. It takes years upon years to achieve such a position, and in those years you will be slugging it out in the accounting department doing all the things you thought you would be avoiding. Also, you will be sitting there with all the other over-achieving kids that were inspired by the same presentation that told them they could rule the world with a CA designation.

Dont get me wrong, it is extremely useful and reputable in the business world, but you have to like the accounting part of the job. If you are shooting for the top and want to avoid the number crunching then an MBA is definitely more suited for you in my opinion.

An MBA and a CA is a lot of schooling in one shot. Some companies will pay for you to get your MBA while working for them, which is a huge advantage. It is easier to get an MBA if you have a CA or CGA than it is to go and get an accounting designation from an MBA or undergrad that majors in something other than accounting, simply because there are specific courses you would have to retake.

This is just a culmination of everything I have researched about the subject, all of it is open for discussion.


The only fast way to the top of a company, other than forging your own, is connections.
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