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Can Biology undergraduates do protein and enzyme research or study pharmarcy in graduate school.

A photo of wanghaoanyiyi wanghaoanyiyi
Hi everyone:

I study Biology in UK. I want to do protein and enzyme-related research in the future, especially in graduate school and Phd or do pharmarcy in the future. However, I am afraid that a Biology degree cannot do these. First off, the courses that I take do not have any protein and enzyme courses. Secondly, I am afraid that the Chemistry that the courses offer are not sufficient to be a pharmarcist or be an ideal candidate for graduate study in pharmarcy. What should I do? The rigid UK course system do not permit me to choose whatever courses I like. Studying medicine is also one of my aspirations but the lack of Physics and Calculus courses make me fail to fulfil the pre-med requirement for a med school in Canada. What should I do?

Thank you so much for your help.
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1 replies
 
A photo of Taengoo Taengoo
First of all, you're wrong to assume that you can't go to graduate school unless you have a related undergraduate degree. Marks are obviously the most important factor that will determine if you can continue to graduate studies. If you don't have to marks, you'll have a hard time convincing professors to take you in. But more often than not, the deciding factor is whether or not you've accumulated experience in research. Most professors will be reluctant to accept students that have not had any laboratory experience, unless they are utterly impressed. I would recommend that you find a professor that deals with the type of research that you're interested in, and try to land yourself a position in his or her laboratory. If you are successful and build a good relationship with the professor, you may even manage to secure yourself a spot in the lab for graduate studies.

As for pharmacy schools (in Canada), most of them only require basic Chemistry, Biology, and Math courses. Obviously, it would be a good idea to go on the university websites to check if you have the equivalent prerequisites. But if you've got those courses and have a high overall academic standing, there is nothing stopping you from applying to pharmacy school. Of course, it would help to already have a background in medicinal chemistry, but it definitely isn't necessary. You will have a chance to take the same courses once you start your studies at the pharmacy school.

The same goes for medical schools.
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