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A photo of BChun BChun
To your first question: pretty well any of the good schools for CAs are good schools for CMAs. You will end up taking a lot of the same courses and sometimes applying for the same co-ops/internships, and you do the same sort of case competitions and attend the same conferences and such. They're both under accounting so it's very close. Also remember that many people who want to be CAs will end up wanting to become CMAs (or even CGAs), typically because they find management accounting much better than financial accounting/auditing/tax and/or they don't want to have to go through the lengthier/more rigorous CA accreditation process.

Here's a list of the accredited programs: http://www.cma-ontario.org/index.cfm?ci_id=7773&la_id=1 . Being in an accredited program allows you to skip the CMA entrance exam. The list isn't very long, and it's not a big deal if you have to write it from what I hear.

My personal picks would be Waterloo, Laurier, Queen's, Ivey and Rotman (in no particular order).

The schools you listed are all accredited, which is good. I would rank them as they appear, although maybe the last two could be flipped. If you could bump your average up a bit it would expand the number/quality of programs you can apply to.

As for IT, there's lots of IT college programs, there's some programs in university that have it as a major/minor/specialization, and there's a few programs dedicated to IT (or at Ryerson, one at Waterloo I think). IT people are needed everywhere there's computers and technology, which is pretty well everywhere nowadays. At a more advanced level you could be designing and working with business process systems and such. The classic IT job is the guy who fixes the computers, makes sure the network runs smoothly, and does some other jobs that most people don't think/care about.
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A photo of caveman caveman
To your first question: pretty well any of the good schools for CAs are good schools for CMAs. You will end up taking a lot of the same courses and sometimes applying for the same co-ops/internships, and you do the same sort of case competitions and attend the same conferences and such. They're both under accounting so it's very close. Also remember that many people who want to be CAs will end up wanting to become CMAs (or even CGAs), typically because they find management accounting much better than financial accounting/auditing/tax and/or they don't want to have to go through the lengthier/more rigorous CA accreditation process.

Here's a list of the accredited programs: http://www.cma-ontario.org/index.cfm?ci_id=7773&la_id=1 . Being in an accredited program allows you to skip the CMA entrance exam. The list isn't very long, and it's not a big deal if you have to write it from what I hear.

My personal picks would be Waterloo, Laurier, Queen's, Ivey and Rotman (in no particular order).

The schools you listed are all accredited, which is good. I would rank them as they appear, although maybe the last two could be flipped. If you could bump your average up a bit it would expand the number/quality of programs you can apply to.

As for IT, there's lots of IT college programs, there's some programs in university that have it as a major/minor/specialization, and there's a few programs dedicated to IT (or at Ryerson, one at Waterloo I think). IT people are needed everywhere there's computers and technology, which is pretty well everywhere nowadays. At a more advanced level you could be designing and working with business process systems and such. The classic IT job is the guy who fixes the computers, makes sure the network runs smoothly, and does some other jobs that most people don't think/care about.
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A photo of JonathanEtienne JonathanEtienne

@BChun wrote

Also, on a slightly different question, what exactly does a job in the IT field entail. I've heard that there are good job prospects and it does sound kind of interesting to be in a technology sector combined with some business. Is the path to career in IT acquiring a Commerce degree with a major in Information System? If so, which programs would I be looking at?

I would really appreciate any feedback on these questions, and thank you in advance. :)


Maybe you should take a look at the followings:

Business Technology Management at Laurier Brantford
http://www.wlu.ca/page.php?grp_id=1983&p=17606

Bachelor of Commerce (B.Comm.)- Business Technology Management
http://www.ryerson.ca/co-op/students/coopPrograms/BTM/

You can also engage yourself in a typical BBA or Bcom and try and do a major in computer science or even go for a dual degree.

I notice Caveman is present here, thus to avoid his excitement, I have limited your options to the borders of Ontario, and will not provide my preference or more specific details unless specified.
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A photo of BChun BChun
Thank you to those who replied earlier... I failed miserably in editing my first post, and deleted it lol

Anyways, I was going to add onto my post with a question about the Waterloo Computing and Financial Management program. It sounds pretty interesting and seems like it provides good opportunities. I am wondering what my top 6 average would need to be around as it says mid-80s but you can never be sure (again mine should be in the 80s), and what would be seen as a decent AIF. I currently only have a couple ECs (rugby, robotics club, and mentoring), with minimal amount of community service hours. Overall, do Universities care about how long you've participated in a club for? I am willing to join 4-5 more clubs next year if it would help my chances. Also, I am looking to get a volunteer position at the YMCA which could probably give me 100-200 community services hours depending on how committed I am to it.
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A photo of JonathanEtienne JonathanEtienne

@BChun wrote
Thank you to those who replied earlier... I failed miserably in editing my first post, and deleted it lol

Anyways, I was going to add onto my post with a question about the Waterloo Computing and Financial Management program. It sounds pretty interesting and seems like it provides good opportunities. I am wondering what my top 6 average would need to be around as it says mid-80s but you can never be sure (again mine should be in the 80s), and what would be seen as a decent AIF. I currently only have a couple ECs (rugby, robotics club, and mentoring), with minimal amount of community service hours. Overall, do Universities care about how long you've participated in a club for? I am willing to join 4-5 more clubs next year if it would help my chances. Also, I am looking to get a volunteer position at the YMCA which could probably give me 100-200 community services hours depending on how committed I am to it.



It depends on the university. Ivey look at your EC, so yes they will look at your "beyond the grades" activities and recognitions. For them it weights a lot in their decision. However, this is not the case for all uni. Laurier will add a maximum of 3% to your average grade if you show enough community involvement, awards, etc.

Generally, schools that look at your "beyond the grades" are competitive schools who cannot accommodate most of the applicants. Focus on getting amazing grades first. Then join clubs, obtain a job, win competitions, etc...not the other way around.

Remember quality is better than quantity. And it's not how long you took part that is important, but what you learned from it - everyone is busy.
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A photo of caveman caveman

@BChun wrote
Thank you to those who replied earlier... I failed miserably in editing my first post, and deleted it lol

Anyways, I was going to add onto my post with a question about the Waterloo Computing and Financial Management program. It sounds pretty interesting and seems like it provides good opportunities. I am wondering what my top 6 average would need to be around as it says mid-80s but you can never be sure (again mine should be in the 80s), and what would be seen as a decent AIF. I currently only have a couple ECs (rugby, robotics club, and mentoring), with minimal amount of community service hours. Overall, do Universities care about how long you've participated in a club for? I am willing to join 4-5 more clubs next year if it would help my chances. Also, I am looking to get a volunteer position at the YMCA which could probably give me 100-200 community services hours depending on how committed I am to it.


Going with what Jonathan said, quality over quantity. It's much better to have 1 EC which you have been doing for many years and have been constantly dedicated to and have measurable results from than 10 ECs all started recently where all you do is show up once a week or month.

So don't just go join all the clubs you can. Pick 2-3 things (some people can do more if they're ambitious) and really focus on them. I would recommend doing DECA though. It's really not much of a time commitment unless you go to internationals, and it's a great chance to meet people, build up your presentation skills and extemporaneous speaking qualities, and if you make it to ICDC it's great to put on your applications.

The CFM program requires mid-80s. If you want to be sure aim for high 80s. If you want to be extra sure aim for 90s. You might want to read some of the information on the CFM program posted in these forums.
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