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Career in the Electrical Field

A photo of DOV94 DOV94
Ok so I'm pretty much around that age where I have to start thinking about what I want to do with my life. I've thought about my skills, interests, yaddy-yaddy-yadda, and narrowed it down to electrical engineer. Did a bit of research on that and thought "It's possible. I'm good.", but recently, I've been doing a little more thinking. Being the engineer is great and all, but I also want to be a technician. The whole two-sides-of-the-coin thing. Only problem is, now that I have two paths planned, I don't know where to start, or even where to go from here. I know I have to do some research on the technician part, but does anyone know what I can do? Like which one should I do first? I know Uni for the engineering, but what about the technicianing? Any suggestions? Thanks!
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
to become a technician you have to go to college....im not sure exactly what its called (electric tech?) but anyways i hav a buddy thinkin about doing civil tech and whats good about the program is that hes able to go from college to university. So civil tech to civil engineering....however if ur really interested in doing work with your hands look at becoming an electrician...otherwise go for electrical engineering
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A photo of plato plato
The most common route is university first, and a college certificate to give you a more hands on approach. If you have your heart on being a Technician, then go straight into college. Good job projects with both routes.
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A photo of DOV94 DOV94
LOL Just going to college is not going to go over well with my parents, but that's beside the point. I'm thinking about what pj2121 was talking about: doing one As WELL AS the other.
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A photo of thePurpleEngineer thePurpleEngineer
Technician - college certificate
Engineer - Bachelor degree

Being a technician and an engineer are two VERY different things... It's not so much "two-sides-of-the-coin thing", mainly due to the way the engineers are educated. Engineers are taught to design & innovate whereas technicians are not necessarily taught the same values.

When you said you want to do "technician-ing", I think you meant that you'd like some "practical hands-on work" on electrical circuits, power generators, etc. If you DID mean to say that, I can assure you that engineers are trained to do all those "hands-on" work as well. How else are you going to design the circuit or the generators if you don't even know how to use them??

Let me know if you've got more questions.
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A photo of DOV94 DOV94
Yes that's what I meant. Designing the circuits, as well as building them. I honestly thought that is was one or the other. Could you just give me a little more description on being a technician? To compare them. Just out of curiosity.
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A photo of thePurpleEngineer thePurpleEngineer

@DOV94 wrote
Yes that's what I meant. Designing the circuits, as well as building them. I honestly thought that is was one or the other. Could you just give me a little more description on being a technician? To compare them. Just out of curiosity.


It's good that we caught that before you decided to go to college...

Here's how electrical engineers & technicians would do their work.
Let's take nuclear power plant for example:

1. Electrical engineers (along with engineers from other disciplines) design the power plan electrical system including mathematical modelling, prototyping, technical specification, documentation, etc.
2. The engineers will put the design through rigorous verification to ensure that the power plant design will not break.
3. The technicians will be trained how to operate machineries/circuits used inside the power plant electrical system. They are also trained to debug simple problems in the electrical system.
4. If any major problem arises or if any modification must be made in the power plant, the engineers will be asked to design the new changes for the plant.

Fun fact, at power plants in Pickering, the engineers use a robot to navigate through the power plant buildings and monitor the situation (since there's radiation inside the power plant). If for any reason the robots cannot be used, the engineers send the technicians in instead of the robots...

In short, I'd become an engineer over technician given the choice.
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A photo of DOV94 DOV94
Oh ok I get it now. Thanks a lot for your help! I think I'll be sticking with engineering. :P

And by the way, that kind of seems redundant to me because the reson they sent in the robots in the first place was to avaiod radiating people. Or do they have like special hazmat suits or something?
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A photo of DOV94 DOV94
the reason*
to avoid*
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A photo of thePurpleEngineer thePurpleEngineer
The robots go so that the humans don't have to. Sometimes, the robots do not work/ already in use in another part of the plant/ cannot get to certain places... then, the engineers have to send in technicians to check on the area of interest. (Of course, the technicians have to wear protective gears when they go into dangerous areas)
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A photo of DOV94 DOV94
Yea, that's what I thought.
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