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China getting rid of useless university majors

A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
http://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2011/11/23/china-to-cancel-college-majors-that-dont-pay/

China’s Ministry of Education announced this week plans to phase out majors producing unemployable graduates, according to state-run media Xinhua. The government will soon start evaluating college majors by their employment rates, downsizing or cutting those studies in which less than 60% of graduates fail for two consecutive years to find work.

But as the U.S. struggles to cope with its own generation of jobless graduates, the American education system has also come into question and many American college students are rethinking the value of their own majors. What if the U.S. government were to adopt China’s approach? According to the most recent U.S. census data, among the first majors to go: psychology, U.S. history and military technologies.


AND it's happening here, too:

http://www.queensu.ca/news/articles/bfa-enrolment-suspended-2012-13

The Faculty of Arts and Science is suspending admission and upper-year transfers to the Bachelor of Fine Art (BFA) program for the 2012-2013 academic year based on an assessment of the faculty resources available to support the program.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
I like it.

Well, I mean, phasing them out is a little harsh, but it certainly should be advised to people working towards such degrees that their degree is unemployable. Too many people choose their degree based solely on what interests them and not what is also employable. There's a big difference between career and hobby, and too many (hippies) forget that. I love to golf, but I would never spend four years of my life and $30,000-80,000 to practice at it full time but with no realistic expectation that I'll end up making money from it. Hobbies should be learned/practiced on your own time and with relatively minimal monetary investment. Simply liking art, golf, history, etc... is no reason to study it in university. Those who do end up camping out in parks all around the world, complaining about nearly every injustice they can think of, assuming that the world is and should be a just place.
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A photo of OscarUK OscarUK

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
I like it.

Well, I mean, phasing them out is a little harsh, but it certainly should be advised to people working towards such degrees that their degree is unemployable. Too many people choose their degree based solely on what interests them and not what is also employable. There's a big difference between career and hobby, and too many (hippies) forget that. I love to golf, but I would never spend four years of my life and $30,000-80,000 to practice at it full time but with no realistic expectation that I'll end up making money from it. Hobbies should be learned/practiced on your own time and with relatively minimal monetary investment. Simply liking art, golf, history, etc... is no reason to study it in university. Those who do end up camping out in parks all around the world, complaining about nearly every injustice they can think of, assuming that the world is and should be a just place.



You're right! What we need are more deluded business grads who are convinced that the second they leave university they will be offered thousands of incredible executive positions and will be making millions on Wall St within their first year! We need more economics grads who's bright ideas have got us into the excellent economic situation of the last 4 years! We need more Scientists to build underground colliders at costs beyond anything imaginable to conclude that their experiments have found nothing! We should burn all texts described as "fiction"! And we should wage genocide against all you dare to question the world we have created, all who write, perform, create, think freely and debate... the HIPPIES!

And in our spere time we can all play golf, and the world will be perfect.

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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
I concur.
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A photo of OscarUK OscarUK
Things that are more rational than taking educational advice from China:

Public speaking tips from Bush Jr.
Equality advice from Hitler.
Economics ideas from Greenspan.
Life lessons from God. (ok maybe that is too far)

But the idea of basing our educational model on the most censored, state controlled totalitarian regime outside North Korea or America... is nuts.
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A photo of chatmike chatmike
Here's what this whole argument boils down to:

In the ideal society, all citizens should be doing a job they want to do. Something that interests them, and something beneficial to society.

However our society does not value that. There is hardly a marketable field for those in Arts or some of the social sciences and no money = no jobs.

Theres a great video on this topic, it's kinda lengthy but its a lovely watch if you have like 20 minutes to kill.

"School Kills Creativity"
[url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iG9CE55wbtY[/url]

Cheers.
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A photo of OscarUK OscarUK
There is no argument. Getting rid of Humanities and Social Sciences degrees would be catastrophic to society, politics, economics, culture and quality of life in any country in the world. Anyone who think's differently is kidding themselves.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo

@OscarUK wrote
on the most censored, state controlled totalitarian regime outside North Korea or America



I see what you did there.
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A photo of SassyAmbivalence SassyAmbivalence
This is a joke. An Arts degree is only non-marketable if the individual can't sell himself.

If I wanted a degree for the sole purpose of having a job, I'd go to college and become an electrician (which pays well in this part of the world). Turns out, I want to learn and be in an environment where I can expend to my full capacity mentally and have an intellectual stimuli of some sort.

Just a few points; getting an engineering or business degree doesn't land you a job quite well it seems huh? In fact, most BAs don't land you a job - there used to be a time when waving a BA degree had value, but since 'so many people' get BAs, its value has inflated.

Obviously the fear of not getting a job is there, but I'm 'more' than my future degree? Like I said, you have to know how to sell yourself. Most people with my degree in this country can't find a job? Fine. What can I put 'forward' that will differentiate myself from them? Fluency in 4 languages, personality, achievements (just stating examples, not talking about myself per se)

I plan on going to Grad school after my undergrad, so I am confident in my ability to get a job.

Study what you excel at and what you love. You need both, as cliché as it sounds.

You're not a hippie-tumblr-loving-indie-listening-independant-coffee-drinking kid if you get into liberal arts for God's sake.

Choose the degree you want a play smart. I'm under the impression you can't do much with a psychology degree too. I have an uncle who's a professor of linguistics who sat down for a full 3 hours with me trying to talk me out of getting a Political Science degree. He tried explaining that it won't get me a job and that he knows poli sci individuals with doctorates in that field driving taxis.

What I love about a liberal arts degree is that I am able to take on 'a lot of careers' at once. How many degrees would allow me the opportunity to do journalism, be an interpreter and translator - at once?

This is my take on it. If you have a career in mind, then by all means don't be a fool and take on a degree that will help you achieve it. For me, it happens to be liberals arts, for another it might be chemical engineering.

if we were to only rely on 'what will get you a job' degrees, I'd say that within the Liberal Arts sphere, you've gotta understand the needs of the country. What does Canada need? We're a multicultural society, a bilingual country in a world going through globalization - naturally, this means degrees in Linguistics, translation (and MAs in either) are in extremely high demand. I'm not kidding when I say the pay is extremely good. The only downside to this would be that most jobs are by contract.


All this crap to say the following: Do what you are good at, what intrigues you, what you enjoy. Find a way to market yourself. Become innovators, not stats of a capitalistic society.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
As long as you realize that you have to be able to market yourself really well and need to pursue an advanced degree, then I would say you're realistic.

90-95% of the people with Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, and Biology bachelor's degrees but no additional advanced degree/certification are not going to end up with jobs related to their program or that require a bachelor's degree. Those other 5-10% are the ones who are strongly passionate about their chosen field; get involved with related extracurricular activities; become highly skilled at networking, verbal and written communication, and managing people; and are willing to start low and climb up the ladder, while working wherever the jobs are at.
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A photo of SassyAmbivalence SassyAmbivalence

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
As long as you realize that you have to be able to market yourself really well and need to pursue an advanced degree, then I would say you're realistic.

90-95% of the people with Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, and Biology bachelor's degrees but no additional advanced degree/certification are not going to end up with jobs related to their program or that require a bachelor's degree. Those other 5-10% are the ones who are strongly passionate about their chosen field; get involved with related extracurricular activities; become highly skilled at networking, verbal and written communication, and managing people; and are willing to start low and climb up the ladder, while working wherever the jobs are at.




Exactly. Advanced degree. Networking. People skills. Qualifications.

But to say 'lulz Liberal arts degree are useless' is blasphemous. It is only useless (like any other degree) if you can't market it. There are fields that require a liberal arts degree.

BTW I remember being in grade 10 and being obsessed with becoming a pharmacist so I used to read your posts to get informed ...a lot. Ha, just saying ... they were pretty helpful *cheers* (hope that didn't come off as creepy) Holy Macaroni and cheese, that was two years ago :O
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
Saying you can market it and actually being able to do so well enough to land a related job are two different things. In that light, Liberal Arts degrees are quite useless (as far as employability goes): people who can market themselves that well will have little problem finding a job regardless of their educational background. Reality is, the number of people graduating with Liberal Arts degrees GREATLY exceeds the number of entry-level jobs that require Liberal Arts degrees.

It depends on the person, but, in general, it's a waste of your time and money to get a Liberal Arts degree (and there are many other degrees too that this could be said about). If you're interested in some liberal arts subject, get a minor in it, study it outside of class; there's nothing wrong with that. Make it a hobby. I have a strong interest in ancient history, but I've never taken a course in it, and I probably never will. My interest is so strong that I don't need to take a course to learn the material, and I probably know more about it than most people who have taken courses in it. The difference is, I have nothing to prove that I know a lot about ancient history. Do I care? No. I wouldn't be able to make a career out of it, nor would I probably actually want to. Learning about some subject on my own time and conducting research on it on a full-time basis are two different things. I probably would not enjoy the day-to-day activities of an ancient historian, even though I like learning about ancient history.

Thing is, I would be quite pissed off if I completed a degree in ancient history, knowing little more about it than I was able to learn on my own time, and were not able to make anything out of it. I'd be working some crappy job trying to pay off my student loans.

It's not that I am biased against liberal arts degrees and am trying to discourage people from attempting to complete them; I just want to teach others what I've learned: the primary purpose of a university degree (given its expensiveness) should be to help you land a job. Non-employable interests should be saved for minors and/or your bookshelf. If you have a strong interest that you think could be employable but aren't sure, then be warned: you're going to have to work hard to market yourself and, even if, could easily end up without a related job, feeling like you wasted a lot of time and money.
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A photo of SassyAmbivalence SassyAmbivalence

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
Saying you can market it and actually being able to do so well enough to land a related job are two different things. In that light, Liberal Arts degrees are quite useless (as far as employability goes): people who can market themselves that well will have little problem finding a job regardless of their educational background. Reality is, the number of people graduating with Liberal Arts degrees GREATLY exceeds the number of entry-level jobs that require Liberal Arts degrees.

It depends on the person, but, in general, it's a waste of your time and money to get a Liberal Arts degree (and there are many other degrees too that this could be said about). If you're interested in some liberal arts subject, get a minor in it, study it outside of class; there's nothing wrong with that. Make it a hobby. I have a strong interest in ancient history, but I've never taken a course in it, and I probably never will. My interest is so strong that I don't need to take a course to learn the material, and I probably know more about it than most people who have taken courses in it. The difference is, I have nothing to prove that I know a lot about ancient history. Do I care? No. I wouldn't be able to make a career out of it, nor would I probably actually want to. Learning about some subject on my own time and conducting research on it on a full-time basis are two different things. I probably would not enjoy the day-to-day activities of an ancient historian, even though I like learning about ancient history.

Thing is, I would be quite pissed off if I completed a degree in ancient history, knowing little more about it than I was able to learn on my own time, and were not able to make anything out of it. I'd be working some crappy job trying to pay off my student loans.

It's not that I am biased against liberal arts degrees and am trying to discourage people from attempting to complete them; I just want to teach others what I've learned: the primary purpose of a university degree (given its expensiveness) should be to help you land a job. Non-employable interests should be saved for minors and/or your bookshelf. If you have a strong interest that you think could be employable but aren't sure, then be warned: you're going to have to work hard to market yourself and, even if, could easily end up without a related job, feeling like you wasted a lot of time and money.




Not all liberal arts degrees are 'unemployable'. It's all subjective. In my case, for the career I have in mind - I need a BA in liberal arts, a Masters in Translation and a 2 year experience in the field of interpreter. Honest to God - I have yet to hear of someone with a BA in Linguistics or Translation who has a hard time finding a job. Political science is another story, you are pretty much screwed if you don't plan on going to grad school (and by that I mean Law School...IF you get in).


Regardless of educational background the key is to know how to throw your dices. That's why I'm stressing the 'do what you excel at' - because when you do, your chances of landing a job are very high. Fortune favors the bold. Don't force a locksmith to perform surgery.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
I won't disagree; I was generalizing. I'm neither willing nor able to go into all the specific fields of the liberal arts, criticizing each on the basis of employability. While I was generalizing, my advice too was general: carefully consider the employability of your potential Liberal Arts degree. Is it worth spending the money and time to get it? Sadly, very few people actually go to any great depth in considering the employability of their (Liberal Arts) degree. They just assume that things will just fall into place. Unfortunately, that's rarely ever true.

I am a good source of information on this topic. I know lots of recent university and college graduates from all sorts of fields. I know how rough it is for most people to find jobs, yet I've also seen people have no problem whatsoever finding jobs. Those people either had in-demand degrees or were highly talented at some skill (sales ability, in particular).
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
lol

OscarUK is such a sped.

First, he says that phasing out arts would be useless - naturally, we find out he's an arts student.

Then, he says taking educational advice from China is bad advice. Why? It's not like universities all over America are constantly being filled with Chinese, is it? It's not like Chinese seem to be the hardest workers, get the best marks, and are traditionally seen to be the smartest, most capable students, is it?
Let's also not forget that the Chinese president and the rest of the politicians in power were all previously engineers before going into running the country.

OscarUK is a troll. Obviously.

The only reason universities keep those useless arts degrees is because people are dumb enough to pay for them.
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A photo of OscarUK OscarUK

@rightsaidfred wrote
lol

OscarUK is such a sped.

First, he says that phasing out arts would be useless - naturally, we find out he's an arts student.



No sh*t? People defending something they believe in... crazy huh.


@rightsaidfred wrote
Then, he says taking educational advice from China is bad advice. Why? It's not like universities all over America are constantly being filled with Chinese, is it? It's not like Chinese seem to be the hardest workers, get the best marks, and are traditionally seen to be the smartest, most capable students, is it?
Let's also not forget that the Chinese president and the rest of the politicians in power were all previously engineers before going into running the country.



Wow. You don't know very much about the world around you do you. Why do you think Chinese students leave China at the first opportunity? Why do you think they are the hardest workers? (this is, by the way, a stupid generalisation... and the majority are mathematically capable, which does not equate to overall intelligence). Yes some of them are engineers, you going to suggest we base our political system on China now?


@rightsaidfred wrote
OscarUK is a troll. Obviously.



Sadly, no. Just more informed about the world around me than you are.


@rightsaidfred wrote
The only reason universities keep those useless arts degrees is because people are dumb enough to pay for them.



Out of interest, what will you be/are you majoring in?

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A photo of ktel ktel

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
I like it.

Well, I mean, phasing them out is a little harsh, but it certainly should be advised to people working towards such degrees that their degree is unemployable. Too many people choose their degree based solely on what interests them and not what is also employable. There's a big difference between career and hobby, and too many (hippies) forget that. I love to golf, but I would never spend four years of my life and $30,000-80,000 to practice at it full time but with no realistic expectation that I'll end up making money from it. Hobbies should be learned/practiced on your own time and with relatively minimal monetary investment. Simply liking art, golf, history, etc... is no reason to study it in university. Those who do end up camping out in parks all around the world, complaining about nearly every injustice they can think of, assuming that the world is and should be a just place.



I love this paragraph. So good. People are way too entitled to think that they should be perfectly happy with everything all of the time. That's not reality. That's why people get divorced all the time. That's why people think they 'deserve' to get a job even though their skills and abilities aren't up to par.

Margaret Wente got lambasted for expressing similar sentiments: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/margaret-wente/occupiers-are-blaming-the-wrong-people/article2226104/

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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred

No sh*t? People defending something they believe in... crazy huh.


Your beliefs are misguided, and you are deluded.


Wow. You don't know very much about the world around you do you. Why do you think Chinese students leave China at the first opportunity? Why do you think they are the hardest workers? (this is, by the way, a stupid generalisation... and the majority are mathematically capable, which does not equate to overall intelligence). Yes some of them are engineers, you going to suggest we base our political system on China now?


What's up with Brits being so arrogant? All stuck on their little island, not knowing about how the world really works, lol


Sadly, no. Just more informed about the world around me than you are.


Which is why you're coming to Canada, spending twice as much as anyone here, to take an arts degree (which is a waste of time and won't get you a job)?


Out of interest, what will you be/are you majoring in?[


Something that'll get me a job.


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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred

I love this paragraph. So good. People are way too entitled to think that they should be perfectly happy with everything all of the time. That's not reality. That's why people get divorced all the time. That's why people think they 'deserve' to get a job even though their skills and abilities aren't up to par.


That's right.
See, if you major in arts and expect a job, you're dumb. "Going to university" is not synonymous with "Get a job relevant to what I studied."
If you're dumb enough to pay for an education in Women's Studies, well, good luck finding a job other than McDonalds (who also probably won't hire you because you're overqualified).
The reason they keep these degrees as options is because they know people will pay for them and it keeps competition low for other more useful majors.
That's just the way it works. China has the right idea though.
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A photo of Quant Quant
This is the type of thing you would expect from a government with an obscene amount of power. And Canadians are also guilty of supporting increased government intervention in virtually all facets of life (including & especially education) in the name of "equality" and the "gearter good." And therein lies the hilarity of this type of policy. Humanities, social sciences, and all of the other majors that would be most heavily affected by this tend to be very left leaning individuals who support government intervention to increase efficiency & overall utility. As it turns out, their majors have been empirically proven to not contribute very much to either of those things, and now governments are starting to address that issue through legislation - or they are at the very least considering it.

Personally, I am opposed to mandating what people can and can't major in, regardless of how employable it is (and I've ridiculed humanities/social sciences majors endlessly on here over the past couple of years). But this sort of thing would be difficult to prevent when the majority of postsecondary insitituions are public entities. If the government here decided that certain majors contributed very little to our economic growth, I wouldn't be surprised if the same actions were taken.

This is yet another reason to support a privatized educational system.
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred

@Quant wrote
This is the type of thing you would expect from a government with an obscene amount of power. And Canadians are also guilty of supporting increased government intervention in virtually all facets of life (including & especially education) in the name of "equality" and the "gearter good." And therein lies the hilarity of this type of policy. Humanities, social sciences, and all of the other majors that would be most heavily affected by this tend to be very left leaning individuals who support government intervention to increase efficiency & overall utility. As it turns out, their majors have been empirically proven to not contribute very much to either of those things, and now governments are starting to address that issue through legislation - or they are at the very least considering it.

Personally, I am opposed to mandating what people can and can't major in, regardless of how employable it is (and I've ridiculed humanities/social sciences majors endlessly on here over the past couple of years). But this sort of thing would be difficult to prevent when the majority of postsecondary insitituions are public entities. If the government here decided that certain majors contributed very little to our economic growth, I wouldn't be surprised if the same actions were taken.

This is yet another reason to support a privatized educational system.



I'm against governments mandating anything, but they're doing it because the people who take the useless subjects are complaining about not getting jobs.
Also, China, like every country on earth, is a dictatorship, so...
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo

@ktel wrote
I love this paragraph. So good. People are way too entitled to think that they should be perfectly happy with everything all of the time. That's not reality. That's why people get divorced all the time. That's why people think they 'deserve' to get a job even though their skills and abilities aren't up to par.

Margaret Wente got lambasted for expressing similar sentiments: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/margaret-wente/occupiers-are-blaming-the-wrong-people/article2226104/



First of all, great article. Everyone on this forum should read it. Wanting to change the world is a noble cause, worth aiming for, but doing it as a career is unrealistic and getting a university degree is far from the best way of doing it (unless your university degree and the accompanying living expenses are 100% subsidized). There are too many other people trying to do the same thing, and too few jobs for those people. If you want to change the world, volunteering is a much more realistic and equally effective way of going about doing it. Again, you don't need to make saving the world part of your job; make it a hobby. Your job does not need to involve your hobbies; it can and very well should allow you to pursue your hobbies.

People of our generation are too spoiled and too convinced that we can accomplish anything we put our minds to. The real world is all around these people, but they refuse to see it. It is particularly bad with smart high school students who have tons of options available to them and strongly and falsely believe they are capable of accomplishing any and all of them. As they progress through university and start looking for jobs, a lot of them get hit with the reality that you and I have no problem seeing. Those who still refuse to see it end up like the people detailed in that article. I can't help but laugh at them.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo

@Quant wrote
But this sort of thing would be difficult to prevent when the majority of postsecondary insitituions are public entities. If the government here decided that certain majors contributed very little to our economic growth, I wouldn't be surprised if the same actions were taken.

This is yet another reason to support a privatized educational system.



Typical libertarian the-government-will-inevitably-take-it-to-the-extreme argument.

If the government did go to those extremes, then 1) the privatized education system will likely become more prominent, and hippies will still be able to study sociology taught to them by other hippies, 2) if the government chooses to prohibit the privatized education system to not allow that to happen, then it could be for good reason, 3) if it's not for good reason, then we're all F'ed anyway. Libertarians who are against government because of it's ability to effect such laws/rules should be reminded that a "government" does not necessarily have to be in place to enforce such rules; any powerful group can. Powerful groups exist with government and without.
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A photo of SassyAmbivalence SassyAmbivalence

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote

@ktel wrote
I love this paragraph. So good. People are way too entitled to think that they should be perfectly happy with everything all of the time. That's not reality. That's why people get divorced all the time. That's why people think they 'deserve' to get a job even though their skills and abilities aren't up to par.

Margaret Wente got lambasted for expressing similar sentiments: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/margaret-wente/occupiers-are-blaming-the-wrong-people/article2226104/



First of all, great article. Everyone on this forum should read it. Wanting to change the world is a noble cause, worth aiming for, but doing it as a career is unrealistic and getting a university degree is far from the best way of doing it (unless your university degree and the accompanying living expenses are 100% subsidized). There are too many other people trying to do the same thing, and too few jobs for those people. If you want to change the world, volunteering is a much more realistic and equally effective way of going about doing it. Again, you don't need to make saving the world part of your job; make it a hobby. Your job does not need to involve your hobbies; it can and very well should allow you to pursue your hobbies.

People of our generation are too spoiled and too convinced that we can accomplish anything we put our minds to. The real world is all around these people, but they refuse to see it. It is particularly bad with smart high school students who have tons of options available to them and strongly and falsely believe they are capable of accomplishing any and all of them. As they progress through university and start looking for jobs, a lot of them get hit with the reality that you and I have no problem seeing. Those who still refuse to see it end up like the people detailed in that article. I can't help but laugh at them.




Wait what? Why on earth is getting a liberal arts degree relative to wanting to save the world? I wouldn't be surprised if half of you - if not more (and pardon my assumption) fervently believe that people who get into liberal arts own Macbooks and tweet about world issues while sipping some fair trade coffee - while sporting a haughty air. And are hippies - potential questionable hygiene included.

It might be true for some - and those are the ones smacked with 'reality'. Offuckingcourse you won't find a job with a BA in sociology - half the goddamn country is gonna be competing with you with the exact same qualifications. And who gets a 'decent' job solely based on having a BA? Good lord, people graduate with BAs in Mathematics and Physics (said 'employable degrees') and can't get jobs - because it is not concrete. If you get a BA in Engineer you'd get a job in Engineering (hopefully I'd say, so many people are still struggling to find work) no 'duh' you'd use it towards an engineering career.

All the people I know who have remarkable careers all got - guess what? - extra qualifications : Years of experience in said-field, masters, doctorates, PhDs.

I already do work in the future career I want to pursue, and I enjoy it. Happens that once I get a BA and potentially a Masters - I'm going to get 'better pay' doing what I like. Languages. And I'd finally actually get to work for the government. I even already built connections doing (free) internships.

I've prepared myself because I am not idiotic enough to believe that a degree will open up the world to me. I don't mind climbing the said-ladder and the degree that I want to take is not only employable , but in high demand (and expected to be in even higher demand by 2020).

My ex's brother finished business school in Boston and he can't land a job. My brother has an electrical engineering degree and I can't say the 'job-search' is working for him.

You can't dump your degree on the employer's table and say 'here - hire me'.

Good luck perhaps with a degree in political science, psychology, sociology - or any other BA by itself.

You want a job? The reality is, get extra qualifications beyond a BA - extra schooling, unpaid experience, whatever. Getting knocked up thinking your Laurier BA in sociology is gonna do the trick is setting yourself for failure.

---
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A photo of Quant Quant

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote

@Quant wrote
But this sort of thing would be difficult to prevent when the majority of postsecondary insitituions are public entities. If the government here decided that certain majors contributed very little to our economic growth, I wouldn't be surprised if the same actions were taken.

This is yet another reason to support a privatized educational system.



Typical libertarian the-government-will-inevitably-take-it-to-the-extreme argument.

If the government did go to those extremes, then 1) the privatized education system will likely become more prominent, and hippies will still be able to study sociology taught to them by other hippies, 2) if the government chooses to prohibit the privatized education system to not allow that to happen, then it could be for good reason, 3) if it's not for good reason, then we're all F'ed anyway. Libertarians who are against government because of it's ability to effect such laws/rules should be reminded that a "government" does not necessarily have to be in place to enforce such rules; any powerful group can. Powerful groups exist with government and without.



1. I'm not a libertarian.
2. You have no idea what a libertarian is, nor do you seem to have a grasp of political philosophy. Libertarians are not anarchists, therefore they do not support abolishing government as you seem to imply.
3. Upon what ethical grounds do you believe you should have any say in what someone else studies? It should not concern you what another individual chooses to study, regardless of how silly it may be. Just as Christians should not be concerned with whom another person chooses to consensually have sex with.

Your utilitarian argument presented in previous posts is unacceptable. If you are basing your support for this kind of policy on utilitarianism, why not go a step further and support the genocide of homeless people, as they contribute significantly less to society than arts/humanities/social science majors, and it would without question, increase overall efficiency & utility. In fact, this would definitely lead to higher economic growth.

You are not to be taken seriously.
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