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Choosing a School for Science

A photo of anbootsm anbootsm
I am going to university for the physical sciences (chemistry and physics)

I have relatively high marks (about 93% and I'm working on getting them up)so acceptance is not really an issue for me, especially since physical science is not a competitive program, but I was wondering what are the characteristics of a school that are most important when making a decision.

I plan on going to grad school after I complete my undergrad.
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A photo of Stratton Stratton

@anbootsm wrote
I am going to university for the physical sciences (chemistry and physics)

I have relatively high marks (about 93% and I'm working on getting them up)so acceptance is not really an issue for me, especially since physical science is not a competitive program, but I was wondering what are the characteristics of a school that are most important when making a decision.

I plan on going to grad school after I complete my undergrad.



Visit campuses and just go wherever it feels right and wherever you feel like you can get a good avg. to get into grad school (I guess you can get a good avg. anywhere but it depends on how hard you want to work).
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A photo of littleroom littleroom
Go to a large school with lots of volunteering opportunities so you can get some lab experience and hopefully publish.
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A photo of kkaski kkaski
Agreed with above ^
Lots of opportunities is key! Also somewhere where you feel comfortable and can see yourself for the next four years is important so go on lots of tours :)
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A photo of christinathompson christinathompson
Depending on what type of degree you want and how far you are willing to go, I recommened you go to globecampus.ca to look at the ranking of schools and what they are know for. :fish:
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A photo of TheLaw TheLaw
make sure you choose a very reputable school. Your undergrade will always stay with you. Like when u wanna apply for PhD they will look at ur undrg not ur masters.
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A photo of SamerK SamerK
University of Waterloooooooo!!! It has a great reputation for science programs, and offers coop in a lot of different faculties, you would probably be able to get a lot of experience (and get paid) depending on what program or faculty you join, and hey maybe you`ll even get to work in a big company like RIM (Research in Motion!). Check out the campus and the website and see if its right for you!
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
University of Calgary has a very good department of Geoscience if you're interested in turning your interest in physics into a geophysics degree. Guaranteed job opportunities in oil and gas in Calgary after you graduate!
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A photo of sarahtasker sarahtasker
Visit all the campuses and see which one feels right! Good luck!
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A photo of purohit1 purohit1
The science program at the U of Alberta in Edmonton is well rounded, judging by your commitment to the subjects your undergrad looks promising. At the u of a you're pretty much guaranteed experience for your masters, the size of the campus is great and there alot of affiliates within alberta and around the world (italy, india) if you wanted to try that. The best thing though is that the u of a is really trying for a research university image which will really work in your favor in the long run, I know it will for me because im thinking of doing med here. hope this helps
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A photo of AlbertoWeiler AlbertoWeiler
Those interested in science may consider the field of physical science. Physical science is a broad field, which includes physics, chemistry, astronomy, meteorology, oceanology and geology. Since there are many different sciences, most students choose to study one specific field. Nowadays there are various science schools where you can complete your physical science degree. To get a list of schools you may check this link http://www.thedegreeexperts.com
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A photo of VegaKrazmych VegaKrazmych

@AlbertoWeiler wrote
Those interested in science may consider the field of physical science. Physical science is a broad field, which includes physics, chemistry, astronomy, meteorology, oceanology and geology. Since there are many different sciences, most students choose to study one specific field. Nowadays there are various science schools where you can complete your physical science degree. To get a list of schools you may check this link http://www.thedegreeexperts.com



Why do you people even bother???
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I would reccomend you keep up your marks (this keeps your options open). But other than that I agree with what others have said about checking out the campus/school first. Go to open houses etc. It can really make a big difference, I had my heart set on one school but upon visiting it in person I changed my mind! Since you are in the sciences I would also look into the types of labs they have. Pratical labs make a real difference in your quality of learning. Also dont forget about extra curriculars, all school and no play....well it makes your brain explode.
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A photo of FM1 FM1
I've heard that McGill's and UBC's physical science programs are really good.
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A photo of ArchEnemy ArchEnemy
Go to UofT if you really want to do research and graduate school. It has the most funding in Canada.
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A photo of FBerle625 FBerle625
1) You've already decided your program, which is a good start
2) Keep in mind that if any university was bad with their program, they wouldn't have it in the first place! You'll pull the same grades anywhere with those kinds of brains.
3) Before looking at universities, decide
-if you want opportunities to study abroad (i.e. co-op or exchange programs).. in which case consider especially schools filled with those programs, like york or UWO
-if you want a lot of research opportunities and get some lab hours in, consider uni's with TONS of research opps
-if it's better for you to stay home or go away for school. It took a while for me to figure this one out, but this can really make the difference when choosing which offer of admission to accept.

as for the extracurriculars..

If you're 'get involved' kinda person, maybe consider extra curricular opportunities that involve your interests, like wrestling, tennis, chess clubs, student unions or what have you. hope i helped!
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A photo of FBerle625 FBerle625
oh yeahh... and don't forget to check out the universities too!

I find that i get different vibes from different campuses, and i REFUSE to study at some places, just cause it doesn't feel like it's right for me...
you'll find there can be a lot of reasons a good, prestigious university might not be right for you, such as..

1) the environment may be so large, busy and fast-paced that you may feel 'faceless' (i can't personally deal with places like that, it sucks being 'just another number')
2) you don't like the campus
3) class sizes don't look good
4) stressed environment
5) low job opportunities
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A photo of V21Jays V21Jays
I agree with whoever said UofA. I'm in my first year right now, and already have a research position lined up for the summer with an eminent physicist. There are lots of research opportunities, especially if you take the honours physics stream: there is one third- and one fourth-year course in which you undertake an experiment or project of your own.
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A photo of Nahal Nahal
I would suggest going to UBC, I've been to some of their tours and visited with friends a couple times as well. It feels comfortable and the programs that they offer are well rounded. Plus opportunities to join science related clubs are available too.
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A photo of AshleyLynne AshleyLynne
University of waterloo is good for physical sciences especially because they offer sever different masters programs. Western is probably the best for physical sciences though overall.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@anbootsm wrote
I am going to university for the physical sciences (chemistry and physics)

I have relatively high marks (about 93% and I'm working on getting them up)so acceptance is not really an issue for me, especially since physical science is not a competitive program, but I was wondering what are the characteristics of a school that are most important when making a decision.

I plan on going to grad school after I complete my undergrad.



U of T.
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