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Choosing a univeristy for Comp Sci

A photo of kkvnlxy kkvnlxy
Hi all,
I am losing the direction now, and want to hear some advice.
I am a computer science student currently attending a college in BC, and by the end of this April, I will obtain an associate degree of science. In other word, after this semester, I will finish my college study, and am supposed to move on.
Since an associate degree cannot do anything, I am more willing to advance to a university, but I don't have a decent GPA.
The average GPA for 70 credits is only 2.44 (which SFU considered and rejected my application recently) and 2.56 for the most recent 30 credits (which UBC are considering. although they have not yet replied to my application, I know the possibility of getting into there is very small.)
I know my GPA is poor, but I really don't wanna go back to work at a restaurant for minimum wage. So I want to move beyond.

Everybody please, I want to know:
1. What will be the admission GPA for university transfer for UVic, McMaster U., U. of Alberta, U. of Calgary, and Queen's U. (for computer science)?
2. What other university I will be more likely to be accepted? and what is their admission GPA?
3. If you have any other advice, I am open for it.

Thank you for taking time reading the post.
Have a good one.
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7 replies
 
A photo of Bscit Bscit
Dont have an answer to your question, you should maybe call the university or ask your guidance Counsellor.
But i would recommend applying to Waterloo and also UofT.
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A photo of kkvnlxy kkvnlxy

@Bscit wrote
Dont have an answer to your question, you should maybe call the university or ask your guidance Counsellor.
But i would recommend applying to Waterloo and also UofT.



Thank you for you input first.
But I am afraid that U. Waterloo and U. T will have a much higher admission GPA average than the universities I mentioned above since they are two of the top computing science institutes.
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A photo of Serllen Serllen
Have you considered BCIT?
BCIT isn't really a bad school for computer science. In fact considering that you will be finishing your college this year that also means you don't have much time on hand to waste before you start doing something relating to computer science. Also, some also say that going to BCIT is a guarantee to a decent job. Plus most BCIT's programs are only about 2~3 years long and I'm sure some of your credits are transferable. So why not consider this option?
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A photo of kkvnlxy kkvnlxy

@Serllen wrote
Have you considered BCIT?
BCIT isn't really a bad school for computer science. In fact considering that you will be finishing your college this year that also means you don't have much time on hand to waste before you start doing something relating to computer science. Also, some also say that going to BCIT is a guarantee to a decent job. Plus most BCIT's programs are only about 2~3 years long and I'm sure some of your credits are transferable. So why not consider this option?



Thank you first of all.
From your signature, I guess you're a high school student that with very few knowledge about computer science (correct me if I am wrong).
Avoiding to go to BCIT or such practical institutes is what I am trying to do. At BCIT, they teach material very application-specific, such as programming in one language, or developing applications under some environment.
This may sounds perfect to you, but it is actually the WORST education you can obtain! You can easily imagine this:
About ten years ago, Novell was very popular, and a lot of schools (including BCIT) taught courses based on Novell and handed out certificates. A few years later, Novell is no longer popular (in fact, it is dead.), all of those students lost their "decent" jobs, and went back to school and learned some other similar things. This cycle is still ongoing for some people,now!
Think of paying thousands of dollar to get a job for a few years, immediately I refuse to go to such school.
You seem to be accepted by a lot of good schools, good luck! And I hope you are going to graduate as a computing science graduate 4 years later!
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A photo of Serllen Serllen
Well, if university doesn't accept you because of you associate degree I don't see why you wouldn't consider BCIT. Even if you don't want to go to BCIT, why not just find a job that's associate with computer science. If they accept you, you will be able to receive that will help you to suit the job better, for example, EA. Yes, going into university and obtain a degree there will open up a wider road for you but considering that the time you have going into university may not be the best choice for you. According to your logic, computer science is a very fast pace industry and yes it is; that is why I time really is a concern to you so what I would suggest you to do is go to BCIT, get a decent job, learn other things while you are on your job so you won't get eliminated as one technology is eliminated. (This is actually one of the reason that I chose computer science because it requires people to innovate and think critically.) Plus almost all the languages are C based, even Java is similar to C so because BCIT teaching or learning only one language and not wanting to go there appears to me just an excuse. Novell is still being used in BC schools, at least in Burnaby, so I wouldn't call it "dead". Again, I believe computer science is about "thinking" and not how many languages you know and what not. If you have a great idea and make a great computer software, it doesn't matter whether you are a Harvard Ph.D or a high school drop out, companies will still want hire you or buy the copyright of that software.
Anyways, this is up to you. If you can't go to UBC or SFU why don't you try to apply for University of Victoria, University of Northern British Columbia, Kwantlen Polytechnic University? Since it doesn't really matter where you obtain your computer science degree because it really is the same for almost everywhere unless you intend to work for big names like Adobe, Microsoft or Apple.
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A photo of kkvnlxy kkvnlxy

@Serllen wrote
Well, if university doesn't accept you because of you associate degree I don't see why you wouldn't consider BCIT. Even if you don't want to go to BCIT, why not just find a job that's associate with computer science. If they accept you, you will be able to receive that will help you to suit the job better, for example, EA. Yes, going into university and obtain a degree there will open up a wider road for you but considering that the time you have going into university may not be the best choice for you. According to your logic, computer science is a very fast pace industry and yes it is; that is why I time really is a concern to you so what I would suggest you to do is go to BCIT, get a decent job, learn other things while you are on your job so you won't get eliminated as one technology is eliminated. (This is actually one of the reason that I chose computer science because it requires people to innovate and think critically.) Plus almost all the languages are C based, even Java is similar to C so because BCIT teaching or learning only one language and not wanting to go there appears to me just an excuse. Novell is still being used in BC schools, at least in Burnaby, so I wouldn't call it "dead". Again, I believe computer science is about "thinking" and not how many languages you know and what not. If you have a great idea and make a great computer software, it doesn't matter whether you are a Harvard Ph.D or a high school drop out, companies will still want hire you or buy the copyright of that software.
Anyways, this is up to you. If you can't go to UBC or SFU why don't you try to apply for University of Victoria, University of Northern British Columbia, Kwantlen Polytechnic University? Since it doesn't really matter where you obtain your computer science degree because it really is the same for almost everywhere unless you intend to work for big names like Adobe, Microsoft or Apple.



I may be too sensitive, but I find that you feel offended by me. I am sorry if I create some misunderstand.

I didn't say the universities reject my application because I am going to hold an associate degree. In fact, some university like SFU give admission GPA discount for those students who has an associate degree.
There is really few jobs out there for an inexperienced and associate degree man. That is why I want to obtain more education.
I don't need an excuse for refusing to go to BCIT, because finding an excuse for myself can only hurt me, but nothing else. If my previous point is not convincing to you, I cannot make it more convincing. (but it does not mean it is wrong. I hope you find out for yourself later.)

I have, in fact, applied for Uvic, U of A, and U of C. As I said in the post, however, I am wondering the chance to get into it. And also want to know if there is other universities on the east coast will more likely to accept me. But thank you for your advice for BCIT, although I personally refuse to.

By the way, I am not trying to offend you, but your motivation of going into computing science will make you suffer. Computing science is not about innovation nor critical thinking nor self-affirmation, but nothing more than self-discipline. Don't accept those words from your high school teachers saying "you are a good student and you should do this and do that....." Find a subject that you really have passion, and work on it; you will done the job much more better.

If you don't mind, please keep this post, and reply me how you think 2-3 years later?
1) Is computing science changes so fast (or a lot)? at least since 1970s.
2) After you take any introduction of software engineering, how would you consider a software/system is dead?
3) How to make a software better by a "great idea"?

Last but not least, if you are going to coop in the future, or applying jobs, avoid going to EA (or even any game company) and microsoft. Try SAP and IBM.

This is going to be the last post I reply you (at least in 2 years :P).
And once again, I am not going to offend you or give you lecture, but I just wanna share some experiences to a good young man. Good Luck in the future.
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A photo of kkvnlxy kkvnlxy
Well... It looks like I have come to a wrong place to ask questions, since all of you are high school grads
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