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Choosing the right field of major

A photo of drexu drexu
The most directly applicable program is Mechatronics. Electrical and computer engineering also have strong applications in robotics. Mechanical engineering has a smaller connection, related to the mechanical components. All robotic applications are computer controlled and electrically driven. Mechatronics is - as the name implies - a fusion of electrical, computer and mechanical engineering.
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A photo of plato plato
The most directly applicable program is Mechatronics. Electrical and computer engineering also have strong applications in robotics. Mechanical engineering has a smaller connection, related to the mechanical components. All robotic applications are computer controlled and electrically driven. Mechatronics is - as the name implies - a fusion of electrical, computer and mechanical engineering.
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A photo of AKhan11 AKhan11
Here are the program outlines for the following programs:
Mechatronics Engineering
Computer Engineering
Computer Science

As you can see, computer and electrical are very closely related. However, Mechatronics differs from the two because it emphasizes mechanical courses such as "Structure and Properties of Materials" and "Mechanics of Deformable Solids". As the name suggests, Computer Science contains the largest number of programming courses. The bottom line is that robotics is a very wide field. So it really depends on what specific aspect you like about robotics.

-Mechanical side would focus more on the movement of the robot.
-Electrical would focus more on the sensors, engine, and power of the robot.
-Computer would focus more on the control chips that tell what the robot to do.
-Computer Science is used to design the AI so that the computer can use the information from the sensors and make logical decisions.
-Mechatronics is essentially a harmony of all the aforementioned fields. However, it only encompasses limited knowledge of the programs because its impossible to learn all the info about all the fields in 4 years.

Keep in mind that it takes a wide variety of engineers who are experts in different fields to make a robot like NAO.
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A photo of plato plato

@drexu wrote
Does computer science, and software engineering have anything to do with robotics? Are they just mainly focus on the coding of robotic behaviours and AI?

I heard somewhere, that robotics mainly focus on programming (the main heart of the technical side), is that true?

I was thinking of mechatronics, since it's the combination of 4 engineering discipline, an all around powerhouse. But people say they don't do much programming there, and I'm more of a jack of all trades type of person, so I wanted to know if anyone could tell me a bit more about the programming aspect of mechatronics. Thanks!



Computer science and software engineering focus solely on programming. Whereas, computer/electrical engineering deals with hardware, specifically, interfacing with hardware. So a computer science major, for example, might develop algorithms for pattern recognition in a vision system. A computer engineer would develop a 'driver' that lets the host operating system receive input from the physical hardware (ie. camera).

Yes, the lion's share of work in robotics lies in programming, but it depends where in the tool chain you want to work.

I'm not in the Mechatronics program, so you're better off speaking with a student or faculty member to get answers about mechatronics. Robotics as a whole is a jack of all trades discipline. The question is what specifically within robotics you want to do? Keep in mind, that glamorous job opportunities in robotics are not very common. Glamorous referring to working with some autonomous mobile vehicle. Most mechatronic applications are things like anti-lock brakes, which you might find very boring.

I am also interested in robotics and am considering a mechatonics option. At UW, an option lets you explore another discipline within engineering.

However, if you're more interested in subjects like AI and machine learning, you would be better off in computer science.

You should read through the links from the other poster. Research the program and course descriptions.
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A photo of drexu drexu
Thanks a bunch for the information, AKhan11 and plato. :)
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