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Computer Science

A photo of plaidboy plaidboy
Hi, I would like to know more information about Waterloo's co-op Computer Science program.

Is it true you can specialize in Software Engineering with a computer science degree?
What are the advantages and disadvantages to this (easier cs? less job opportunities compared to SE?)

Is there a certain average or GPA needed to specialize in SE, or is it just picking the right electives?

Will computer science be hard for people like me, that didn't take computer science in grade 12?

Is it the same CS courses engineers take for first year, or is it different?

What has the range for cutoffs been like for the past 2-3 years?



Thanks in advance for the questions answered, hopefully this helped other applicants as well.
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred

@plaidboy wrote
Hi, I would like to know more information about Waterloo's co-op Computer Science program.

Is it true you can specialize in Software Engineering with a computer science degree?
What are the advantages and disadvantages to this (easier cs? less job opportunities compared to SE?)

Is there a certain average or GPA needed to specialize in SE, or is it just picking the right electives?

Will computer science be hard for people like me, that didn't take computer science in grade 12?

Is it the same CS courses engineers take for first year, or is it different?

What has the range for cutoffs been like for the past 2-3 years?



Thanks in advance for the questions answered, hopefully this helped other applicants as well.



Software Engineering is a more theoretical version of programming.
I have a friend who took the SE program. He switched to computer science on the grounds that "It's the exact same; it's just less work."
He got a $84,000 a year job with his CS bachelors, $20,000 per term coop with Google while he was in school, and now has a $100,000 job because of his master's.

Probably not.

It's hard for people who aren't good at math, programming, or know nothing about computers.

Depends on the school.

Same across the board: mid 80s and up.
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A photo of Whosaidthat Whosaidthat
It is true, you can specialize.
there are no real "advantages" or "disadvantages", people who take either cs or se can end up having the same job. - as i've heard from both se and ce students and the engineering/mathematics faculty, cs is more theoretical than se
the only major difference is that se is a structured program, you have less flexibility when choosing your electives than if you take cs.
like they say, gr12 cs is an asset to have, but gr11 cs is recommended, it's really helpful if you have some "experience in developing well-structured, modular programs"
and the cut as they say is usually mid-80's but to have a good chance, it really should say high 80s
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A photo of Nick0rz Nick0rz

@rightsaidfred wrote

Software Engineering is a more theoretical version of programming.



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A photo of Irvanjit802 Irvanjit802

@Nick0rz wrote

@rightsaidfred wrote

Software Engineering is a more theoretical version of programming.






He's a fukn 11th grader posting like hes already in an engineering program at waterloo. I just ignore all of his posts, 100% false.

Not to mention, he tries to troll a few threads to. L2troll

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A photo of greygoose greygoose

@plaidboy wrote
Is it true you can specialize in Software Engineering with a computer science degree?
What are the advantages and disadvantages to this (easier cs? less job opportunities compared to SE?)



None. SE is a bunch of garbage, as far as I'm concerned. It intends to teach good software engineering practices, as opposed to the math behind computation and theoretical aspects of computer science. Because it basically teaches you a bunch of stuff you'd learn to beat around the bullshit in a big company, I think it's a waste of time. You can figure that stuff out at work, rather than wasting your time learning it in undergrad. Learn workplace skills in the workplace!

The CS in SE is easier, because it's less theoretical. The job opportunities are exactly the same. I believe you're taking about the Computer Science/SE Option degree at UW. The "option" designation on your degree is meaningless, employers won't even look at it; as well, you have to take some stupid SE-type courses instead of taking interesting, difficult, real CS courses.


@plaidboy wrote
Is there a certain average or GPA needed to specialize in SE, or is it just picking the right electives?



You just do the required courses, fill out a plan mod form saying I AM CS WITH THIS OPTION and submit it to the registrar, and you're done. You'd probably have to run it by an advisor.


@plaidboy wrote
Will computer science be hard for people like me, that didn't take computer science in grade 12?



To be honest, it will probably be easier, because you haven't had the chance to pick up any bad programming habits. Everyone, even those that have taken CS before, struggle in first term at UW, because functional programming is hard! You will have to put in some work compared to those who've been programming for 5+ years, but those that have been programming a couple years in high school? Nah.


@plaidboy wrote
Is it the same CS courses engineers take for first year, or is it different?



Depends on the breed of engineer, but no, they're all different. CS people take CS 135 (Scheme) and CS 136 (C/Scheme), SE people take CS 137/138 (C only), and engineers take all sorts of things, from C to C# (courtesy of microsoft... gag).


@plaidboy wrote
What has the range for cutoffs been like for the past 2-3 years?



No idea. Ask the admissions office. I'd say aim for 90s anyways... why limit yourself?
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