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Core French

A photo of Luna Luna
I took 4U Core French last semester and I finished with a mark in the high 90s, but I'm a bit concerned about taking French in university next year. I have strong writing and reading skills in French, but essentially all of our high school French lessons have been taught in English so I'm nervous about university lectures. Is anyone else in the same boat? I want to study linguistics at Queen's next year, so it would be beneficial for me to take a language course. I just don't want French to bring my mark down. Does anybody have any insight?
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A photo of heesoup heesoup
Wow, I am in the exact same boat as you!
I really would like to continue in French, but as you said, the high school French courses were instructed in English, so although I am confident in my vocab and grammar, I would not be able to carry a normal conversation with a French person...
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A photo of kyleigh711 kyleigh711
Try talking to someone at the school about the different french courses they have. A lot of schools have different levels for each language (i.e. one course may be for complete beginners who have never heard or spoken the language before and another may be for francophones).

Practicing your conversation skills would help too. If you can convince some of your friends to help you, challenge yourselves to only speak french for half an hour. Itèll improve you confidence and probably be hilarious too :D

Donèt sweat it though cuz the level of french people actually learn in school varies across the different provinces (and even cities) and chances are pretty good that youèll be ahead of some other people who may have stopped after 2D french or 1P french.

Good luck!
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A photo of kyleigh711 kyleigh711

@kyleigh711 wrote
Try talking to someone at the school about the different french courses they have. A lot of schools have different levels for each language (i.e. one course may be for complete beginners who have never heard or spoken the language before and another may be for francophones).

Practicing your conversation skills would help too. If you can convince some of your friends to help you, challenge yourselves to only speak french for half an hour. Itèll improve you confidence and probably be hilarious too :D

Donèt sweat it though cuz the level of french people actually learn in school varies across the different provinces (and even cities) and chances are pretty good that youèll be ahead of some other people who may have stopped after 2D french or 1P french.

Good luck!



Ignore all the ès, they are supposed to be apostrophes. I canèt get apostrophes for some reason.
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A photo of Kyhaara Kyhaara
I am in the same boat, too! (Must be a big boat, or we'll all squished into a small life raft or something!). I love french, but my teacher translates for us and stuff... I hear universities have classes where the professor speaks only in French. Might be a jump, but I guess all the classes will be a jump.
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A photo of moodeline moodeline
If you're from Ontario, don't sweat it, as your high school French is 50 million x better than BC's. And I'm in IB French, but came into it from Ontario being like... I learned this stuff years ago.
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A photo of heesoup heesoup
^ really? I hope so! But BC French should still be similar??
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A photo of nadia93 nadia93
i know that at u of t, they have french courses instructed in english. it says so in the course description. and there are also courses all in french. hopefully this happens at queen's as well?
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A photo of cyynthiia cyynthiia

@moodeline wrote
If you're from Ontario, don't sweat it, as your high school French is 50 million x better than BC's. And I'm in IB French, but came into it from Ontario being like... I learned this stuff years ago.


OOO:
JE NE SUIS PAS D'ACCORD AVEC TOI!

Well, it depends on the person you're talking to.
Last year, I had some guy in my French 11 class who moved here from Toronto.
And my level of French = his level of French.
Many people here in BC don't take French seriously, they take it in grade 8 and 9 because they "have to".. then continue on to grade 10 and 11 because they're too lazy to take another language and think that they just "need to pass" French 11 in order to get into western universities that require a language 11.
That was my mindset going into grade 11 French, until I went on a French exchange to France.
Then I really got into the language, and I love it.
So it really depends on the student you're talking to and also the teacher.
All my French lessons are taught in French, all my handouts and worksheets are in French as well...

But anyways, back to the real topic.
You can take beginner's classes.. I'm pretty sure you'll be able to understand even if the lecture is in French if it's at a beginner's level.
Or talk to representatives from the university.. I know some universities offer language courses in English at the beginning but will be taught in the language you're taking in the later years.
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