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Current GPA admissions.

A photo of cantkeepasecret cantkeepasecret
What are the current grade averages (specifically for the four academic grade 12 courses) required for each of the following schools/programs?

Trent University - Arts Honours (Undeclared)
Carleton University- Arts Honours (Undeclared)
Ryerson University- Arts Honours (Undeclared)
University of BC- Arts
University of BC Okanagan -Arts
Simon Fraser University - Arts

I will have an average of approximately 95% based on my top 4 grade twelve courses and participate in extra curricular-activities (volunteer, aboriginal content and sports). Should I stop stressing about getting into my desired programs if I maintain my current GPA? Thanks!



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A photo of ktel ktel
Are you serious? Yes a 95% average should be more than enough to get you into any program, especially Arts.
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A photo of cantkeepasecret cantkeepasecret
@Ktel Thanks for your response. Yes, I'm serious. I'm just nervous applying to schools out-of-province.
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A photo of cantkeepasecret cantkeepasecret
Even though chemistry and math are my highest courses, I have a passion for English, History and Indigenous Studies. I am hoping to pursue my Bachelors of Ed and Masters of Ed afterwards:)
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A photo of ktel ktel
http://www.studentawards.com/forum.aspx?g=posts&t=10280

Read point 4. Don't waste your money studying something ONLY because you like it. The point of investing money in university is to put yourself ahead financially later. That means being employable.
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A photo of napinhei napinhei

@cantkeepasecret wrote
Even though chemistry and math are my highest courses, I have a passion for English, History and Indigenous Studies. I am hoping to pursue my Bachelors of Ed and Masters of Ed afterwards:)



+1

Not everyone can be Engineers, Doctors, and Lawyers. Imagine what the world would be like if people only studied the things they thought would make them money. The billion dollar film industry wouldn't exist, neither would anything that appeared on the TV, you couldn't immerse yourself in a fictitious world found within the pages of a novel, or listen to music on the radio.
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A photo of ktel ktel
All of the artistic careers you listed above you do not need a university education for. The people who make it in those industries have passion, drive and a lot of luck.
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A photo of napinhei napinhei
That doesn't mean the academics of those areas should die. They are areas which continually require studying as well as passing on from one generation to another in academic settings.

Yes, the actors, musicians/artists, and writers in those industries are often not educated in the fields they are successful in, but perhaps look beyond just the actors, musicians, and writers. Directors, photographers, camera people, film editors, people who do the special effects, scriptwriters, book editors, publishers, game designers, etc all need to be educated in their field. It is nearly impossible to get into those jobs - which must be filled in order for the industries to function - without relevant education.

Even in the music industry! Yes, the big names are often just lucky and are not educated in music, but consider the people that mix the tracks, the artists that work on the album covers, the musicians who play in the background for these artists all require relevant education. And yes, you can argue that the last of those does not require a university education, but consider what would happen if academic institutions dropped the subject all together. Eventually, no one would be educated in reading music. Some people may learn by ear, but never again could music be recorded on paper and understood by anyone other than the composer.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I know a lot of people say "Oh it's only worth going to University to study Engineering or something technical which is employable for today's industries"

Well I have an interest for the field of Psychology. Many will argue that it's not a field worth pursing, To be honest it has so many opportunities within it in terms of specializations I can go onto such as Neuropsychology, Forensic Psychology, and Clinical Health Psychology.

When I complete my undergrad degree I'm planning on doing schooling for a health profession that I always wanted to do and the research interests I have relate to Psychology. I'm still planning on pursuing graduate schooling regardless!

The point which I know anyone will agree with is that it's not financially wise study something based off of interest and not plan on pursuing further education beyond a bachelors to make yourself employable.

Not everyone has to become a Doctor or Engineer!
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A photo of napinhei napinhei
I never said that wasn't true! I would definitely agree with you, Medic, that further education beyond a bachelor's degree is important, particularly for financial stability more than anything else.

Well, okay, so obviously further education won't guarantee financial stability, but it will certainly help since - despite being a great supporter of the arts - I believe the job pond is over saturated with people with bachelor of arts degrees. Further education certainly helps individuals stand out, keep them be competitive in the job market, and helps them earn a greater amount of money in the long run.

Money or not, though, I am definitely an advocate for studying your interests. You may spend the rest of your life regretting it if you don't. I say this because, if you don't pursue something you're interested in, you'll be miserable having to lug yourself into a work every day to a job that you hate. And for what? Money? Ha! So you can do what with it? Pack it in your coffin when you die? I'd prefer a modest life - not broke, obviously, but modest - filled with happiness because I enjoy my life every day over a wealthy, yet miserable, existence until I fall into a grave.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I agree, and don't worry I wasn't saying that you said that only a Bachelors is good enough.

I would much rather study something that truly interests me as opposed to going into a field which I'll be miserable in. I considered Engineering in Grade 9 but then I realized it's not a field I'd see myself excelling in and I wouldn't be satisfied with the career either. I figured out in Grade 10 I wanted to work in the Health Sector, and since then I figured out what I wanted to do before others even had an idea.

It's a difficult thing to decide what you want to study or do in your life when you are in high school. Right now everything is based on your financial future, which yes is beneficial to survive in today's economy but not everyone needs to go into technical based fields just cause the employment is there.


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A photo of napinhei napinhei
It is nice to know that there are people out there who, like me, believe in doing what you love. Between this forum and family, I all too often see people pursuing - or insisting that I pursue - certain subjects merely because it will take them 'where the money is.' Quite sad, really.

And I entirely agree! It is incredibly difficult to make such decisions in high school. Not only do I believe students are too young, but we just haven't experienced enough. Hell, I spent most of my high school life insisting I wanted to pursue psychology. I thought I had it all figured out. Then I reached grade 12 - the first year that psychology and sociology classes were available - and tried the subjects. It was absolutely not for me! Worst part was that there wasn't room for me in the classes until second semester, which meant I'd already applied to psychology long before I'd been able to try it. Long story short, I decided to take a year off instead so I could figure things out.

Basically what I'm saying is... There are so many subjects that universities offer and so few that we actually get to try in high school. How can we make decisions and apply for subjects we've never tried? I think it is just plain silly. As a result, not only did I take that year off, but I've been through one and a quarter college programs already, only to figure out now what it is that I truly want to pursue.
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A photo of cantkeepasecret cantkeepasecret
As I have wanted to be in the field of education for the entire duration of my life, I knew I was going to be completing multiple degrees. With the ultimate goal of curriculum development, I was going to pursue a Master's degree to further my education. In addition, I wanted teachables that I could feel excited about. I love the learning outcomes associated with English, Social Studies and aboriginal-oriented content.

For example, I just completed a second-year post-secondary aboriginal language course with 92%. Upon completion of additional courses within the aboriginal revitalization program at the University of Victoria, I am able to teach it. I increase my chances of employment upon graduation by being an aboriginal student, able to speak a First Nations language, and having multiple teachables.

Medic, I completely agree with your statement, "I would much rather study something that truly interests me as opposed to going into a field which I'll be miserable in."
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@napinhei wrote
It is nice to know that there are people out there who, like me, believe in doing what you love. Between this forum and family, I all too often see people pursuing - or insisting that I pursue - certain subjects merely because it will take them 'where the money is.' Quite sad, really.

And I entirely agree! It is incredibly difficult to make such decisions in high school. Not only do I believe students are too young, but we just haven't experienced enough. Hell, I spent most of my high school life insisting I wanted to pursue psychology. I thought I had it all figured out. Then I reached grade 12 - the first year that psychology and sociology classes were available - and tried the subjects. It was absolutely not for me! Worst part was that there wasn't room for me in the classes until second semester, which meant I'd already applied to psychology long before I'd been able to try it. Long story short, I decided to take a year off instead so I could figure things out.

Basically what I'm saying is... There are so many subjects that universities offer and so few that we actually get to try in high school. How can we make decisions and apply for subjects we've never tried? I think it is just plain silly. As a result, not only did I take that year off, but I've been through one and a quarter college programs already, only to figure out now what it is that I truly want to pursue.



High school students are pushed into University right away without discovering who they are. Education is an important thing, I have the utmost respect for people who want to work on improving our educational system. Seriously the way we shape our future generations to come is in our hands. I want kids to pursue interests, from a Psychology perspective which I'm a total nerd on, we need to look at the long term mental health effects that being miserable can put on a person, the obvious is depression. I think being happy with what you study is the best thing possible, just cause someone is good at Math or Physics doesn't necessarily mean that they have to be an Engineer. If you're a student not enjoying studying what you learn in school, I'm sure you won't be enjoying waking up from 9-5 working in that field either.

Feel free to disagree but I feel that I'm correct.

Everyone has a role in today's society, just like the saying that not everyone has to be a Doctor or Lawyer, not everyone needs to go to University. We have a lot of options in today's world which our secondary school system doesn't reveal to kids. For example working in the Skilled Trades, we need individuals who can perform certain skills and techniques which have proven to be essential apart of our economy. That being said, going to University for the sake of going to University isn't a smart decision unless you actually plan on working in that area.
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A photo of ktel ktel
I never said that you should completely throw all arts programs out the window. Like you said, the market is oversaturated, and perhaps a degree in Old English isn't going to get you anywhere (just a random example). Studying what you love is great, but if you can't get a job doing it then you're not going to be very happy either. I'm just warning people to have a plan other than "Oh I like studying this, let's do that more". That means getting relevant experience and skills.
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A photo of napinhei napinhei
Oh, of course! It is all subjective to what a person's interests are. University is definitely not for everyone. Moreover, our society would crumble if everyone went to university. If they did, we wouldn't have restaurants to go to or, far more important than that, have a house built for each of us to live in. There would be no plumbing or electricity.

We need all sorts of people in the world, with a wide range of skills and education, in order to maintain the life that we are all accustom to.
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A photo of napinhei napinhei

@ktel wrote
I never said that you should completely throw all arts programs out the window. Like you said, the market is oversaturated, and perhaps a degree in Old English isn't going to get you anywhere (just a random example). Studying what you love is great, but if you can't get a job doing it then you're not going to be very happy either. I'm just warning people to have a plan other than "Oh I like studying this, let's do that more". That means getting relevant experience and skills.



Well, of course; however, I think people's ability to find work in a field that they enjoy - and received post-secondary education in - is dependent on one's ability to market themselves. I think if you have a plan of where you want to go and how you apply your interest to the real world, you will be able to take whatever you study and make it valuable to employers in any industry.

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A photo of ktel ktel

@napinhei wrote
I think if you have a plan of where you want to go and how you apply your interest to the real world, you will be able to take whatever you study and make it valuable to employers in any industry.





This is where most students fall short. It all comes back to high school students being so young and not having enough life experience to truly make an informed decision. So many students think "I have a degree, now employ me!"
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@ktel wrote

@napinhei wrote
I think if you have a plan of where you want to go and how you apply your interest to the real world, you will be able to take whatever you study and make it valuable to employers in any industry.





This is where most students fall short. It all comes back to high school students being so young and not having enough life experience to truly make an informed decision. So many students think "I have a degree, now employ me!"



I'm going to point something out which I'd like to hear your opinion personally on.

It's often stated by statistical data that on average University graduates earn more than that of College graduates. Now, let's compare someone who works in the field of umm let's say Electrical. They go to College for their apprenticeship to become an Electrician. Now compare that to someone who just receives their Arts degree and expects to find employment right away.

From my perspective, I see a lot more College graduates getting jobs because of the practical stuff they learned in comparison to certain University majors which just educate you on a subject rather than teach you practical skills.

That being said, people should look into other options besides University if they just assume that a University education will land them a 6 figure salary with a BMW parked in the driveway.

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A photo of napinhei napinhei

@ktel wrote


This is where most students fall short. It all comes back to high school students being so young and not having enough life experience to truly make an informed decision. So many students think "I have a degree, now employ me!"



I definitely agree with this. Honestly, though... Can you blame them? They don't know any better. Like you said, they are young and don't have enough life experience to base such important decisions on. So, since they are pushed to pursue further education - with a particular persistence towards university over college - and they have to make a decision before their are ready to, they base their decisions on what parents, teachers, and guidance counselors say.

Now, not saying that parents aren't looking out for the best interest of their children, but I think that times have changed so much - which parents often don't recognise - that a degree doesn't automatically equal a successful and financially stable future anymore.

And as for teachers and counselors, all they do s push for university degrees. My experience, at least, was such that they made degrees sound as though they were not only the only way to a successful future, but that any degree will automatically make you a hot commodity in the job market. Not the case at all! Sure, in many careers it is a requirement, but it isn't enough. I think what sets people apart is their passion for what they want to pursue, their ability to sell themselves to employers, and their ability to see the practical side in what they study - in anything from philosophy to math and beyond - so as to make it relevant in today's work place.

And all of this is why I'm glad I took so much time off after high school because now, at the age of 20, I can make a truly informed decision.
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A photo of napinhei napinhei
And of course, my post was a vast generalisation.
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A photo of ktel ktel
I know when I was choosing a program to go into I was all over the map. Arts, sciences, engineering, I couldn't decide. I would think "I like English, let's study English" or biology, or whatever. Then when I would talk to my dad about it, he would say "OK, but what are you going to DO with that degree". When I couldn't answer I took it off the list. And that's how I decided on engineering. I could actually see an end career for myself with that degree. To be extra sure I got an engineering summer job after high school and loved it. I knew with that degree somewhere out there I could find a job that I really enjoyed doing and could live on.
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A photo of ktel ktel

@Medic93 wrote

I'm going to point something out which I'd like to hear your opinion personally on.

It's often stated by statistical data that on average University graduates earn more than that of College graduates. Now, let's compare someone who works in the field of umm let's say Electrical. They go to College for their apprenticeship to become an Electrician. Now compare that to someone who just receives their Arts degree and expects to find employment right away.

From my perspective, I see a lot more College graduates getting jobs because of the practical stuff they learned in comparison to certain University majors which just educate you on a subject rather than teach you practical skills.

That being said, people should look into other options besides University if they just assume that a University education will land them a 6 figure salary with a BMW parked in the driveway.





I think the statistical data is supporting that in the long run university graduates have more opportunities for upward mobility and therefore get paid more than college graduates. I'm sure there are many instances where a college graduate makes more than a university graduate, but on the whole I don't think the statistics lie.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
I completely agree with ktel. University is a VERY expensive way of educating yourself, and it's not necessarily the best. I have two "side" interests (Early Human history and financial investments), both of which I haven't taken any courses in through university; rather, I have spent maybe about $1,000 total in books on those two topics. I very likely know as much about those two topics as someone with a bachelor's degree in business/finance or a bachelor's degree in anthropology. The only difference is, I can't apply for a finance-intensive job without a BBA/BComm, as that is proof solid that I know finance concepts at least fairly well. The premium you pay with a university degree is just that: solid proof (specifically to employers) that you know the material. If you don't plan on using your degree to help you land jobs related to your degree, then you're spending a hefty premium just to learn about something you could easily learn about on your own time (especially if you're truly passionate about that topic).

If you're getting a degree simply to reap the supposed rewards of having a degree, then you're in for a surprise. Lots of people have degrees today; lots of people with degrees do not have good jobs and thus are actively searching the market for jobs that require degrees. The number of competitors for every such job is astounding, so don't count on getting a job that just requires a degree.

University grads do get paid more on average; that's true. However, I'm sure if you looked at the stats they'd be quite bimodal, not bell-shaped. In other words, you'd find that there are a lot of people who make great money (six figures) and a lot who make little more than mimimum wage, with unexpectedly few in between. That's because there are quite a few programs that lead to jobs that pay really well (e.g. engineering, business, computer science, geology, life sciences [a good portion of life sciences students go onto professional schools]), but a lot of university programs leave their graduates no more employable than a high school graduate.

Just remember that $60,000 is a lot of money to pay back. That's ~$8,000 a year over 10 years (with interest included). If you're making $25,000/year after tax, doing something you could have done with only a high school diploma, working with some idiot from your high school who has considerably more money than you because he or she made money the last four years and doesn't have to blow a third of his or her annual income on student loan repayments, then you're going to hate yourself. So many people in the "I'm studying Arts in university because it's my passion" boat end up in similar situations as this. You're kidding yourself if you think the probability of you not ending up this way are greater than 50%.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Pretty much everyone in my Family studied or is studying something practical (technical) because they want to seek employment straight out of University.

My plan is unique, well I like to think anyway :P

I'd like to pursue graduate schooling in the field of Psychology no matter what because I have research interests which can't just be studied at home as a hobby, but I'm not planning on doing so straight out of undergrad and I'll save it for either part time education or if my main career backfires. After I get my bachelors I'm going to apply for a 2 year program @ a College to get trained to become a Primary Care Paramedic. No one on this forum ever speaks of this profession and I feel it's under rated and under appreciated. It's really competitive believe it or not!

So even if the whole Psychology graduate schooling doesn't see the light of day cause maybe my marks weren't good enough I know I'll still have a career that can provide me with a comfortable living.

I'd like to work in a profession where I can help people regardless and If I'm not cut out for being a Paramedic then I'm going to do Occupational or Physical Therapy.
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