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Doctor careers

A photo of me14 me14
hi,

im confused about careers in science epescially about doctoral careers...
1) what kind of careers are there in science

2) so basically all u need to become a doctor is :
4 year undergrad
MCAT
4 year med school
then residency right?

3) so what is med school, i have no idea about what it is ...like is it graduate school or a different school or wht...i am clueless

4) what kind of undergrad degree do u need to get into med school...is there a specific degree or can u do nything in science
if u can do any degree, what is preffered(the most helpful in med school)
is a pharmacology degree ok or is too off the track (at western)

5) also at wester, u can do a 6 year combined degree in which there is pharmacology and i think its med school, then u can be a clinical pharmacologist, so
is that true and
can u go into another doctoral specialization after

6) and lastly is there a high demand for clinical pharmacology?

7) what can u be if u dont get into being a doctor :(
are there still other opportunities...

Thank you soooo much in advance

im truly clueless and any advice would be much appreciated...
im looking to see if i really want to do science or not ...

so thankyou sooo much !!! :bball:
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2 replies
 
A photo of ruf ruf
These are the things I know about. If anything's wrong, I'm always open to being corrected. In the end, a lot of the things you asked could be found using Google.

1) There are a variety. Teaching, medicine, research (e.g. marine biologist, chemist), therapy, etc.

2) You have the general idea.

3) You pursue a professional degree in medicine at a medical school. In essence, it is a doctorate degree. An M.D (doctorate of medicine) degree is what you will receive upon completion of medical school. What you probably commonly associate with the term doctorate degree is the Ph.D, which is the doctorate of philosophy degree and is awarded to people who complete doctoral studies in fields in the humanities, sciences, etc.

4) You can do any degree you want, and this does not only include science but any major within other disciplines (e.g. humanities, social sciences, mathematics, etc.). You DO, however, require the completion of prerequisite science programs at university. Each medical school requires a different set of prerequisite programs, but it is usually consistent throughout. Read up on the various medical schools in the country (e.g. UBC and UofT) to find out what they expect from you. Once you're in university, there should be an office that would be able to assist you with the appropriate course selection.

Generally, any science would give you an advantage since you do complete scientific study in medical school. My philosophy, however, is if you're a bright, hard-working, and determined person your undergraduate concentration won't affect your performance at medical school.

5) If there's medical school included you don't need to pursue another doctoral degree unless you want to. You've already completed your M.D. After medical school you would generally pursue an internship or residency.

6) The Google search I did suggests so. But don't worry about choosing a specific career right now, just worry about getting those science prerequisites completed for your program. Once you're medical school you'll be opened up to the very, very wide variety of jobs available to those with an M.D.

7) It all depends on your undergraduate concentration. It looks like you're really keen on science, which is great. I've listed the different careers available for such an undergraduate degree in the first question.

Good luck! :)
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A photo of me14 me14

@ruf wrote
These are the things I know about. If anything's wrong, I'm always open to being corrected. In the end, a lot of the things you asked could be found using Google.

1) There are a variety. Teaching, medicine, research (e.g. marine biologist, chemist), therapy, etc.

2) You have the general idea.

3) You pursue a professional degree in medicine at a medical school. In essence, it is a doctorate degree. An M.D (doctorate of medicine) degree is what you will receive upon completion of medical school. What you probably commonly associate with the term doctorate degree is the Ph.D, which is the doctorate of philosophy degree and is awarded to people who complete doctoral studies in fields in the humanities, sciences, etc.

4) You can do any degree you want, and this does not only include science but any major within other disciplines (e.g. humanities, social sciences, mathematics, etc.). You DO, however, require the completion of prerequisite science programs at university. Each medical school requires a different set of prerequisite programs, but it is usually consistent throughout. Read up on the various medical schools in the country (e.g. UBC and UofT) to find out what they expect from you. Once you're in university, there should be an office that would be able to assist you with the appropriate course selection.

Generally, any science would give you an advantage since you do complete scientific study in medical school. My philosophy, however, is if you're a bright, hard-working, and determined person your undergraduate concentration won't affect your performance at medical school.

5) If there's medical school included you don't need to pursue another doctoral degree unless you want to. You've already completed your M.D. After medical school you would generally pursue an internship or residency.

6) The Google search I did suggests so. But don't worry about choosing a specific career right now, just worry about getting those science prerequisites completed for your program. Once you're medical school you'll be opened up to the very, very wide variety of jobs available to those with an M.D.

7) It all depends on your undergraduate concentration. It looks like you're really keen on science, which is great. I've listed the different careers available for such an undergraduate degree in the first question.

Good luck! :)




Thank you soooo much this really helped!!:bball: :compress:
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