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Don't get caught up with school names...

A photo of vincerz vincerz
I thought about making a thread on this before but I always held back and decided not to. I thought I should at least make a brief post on it given that I could ramble on for hours on this topic..

It's very reasonable for high school students; especially business students to want to go to the best school they can get into. You worked hard in high school, if you got into Upenn obviously you would want to go there instead of some 75% cut off school, it makes sense. For some, it may be because they want the social recognition as an award for their hardwork.. you'll get to tell your family and friends you go to UofT or Queens, yipee!! For others it may be the ability to meet and fit into a class of peers that are all bound to be decently successful in life. Say.. getting to sit in an Ivey class and meeting the great finance leaders of tomorrow.

This is all great and may have it's benefits (e.g. networking and a bit more recruitment than other schools) but IN MY OPINION what means so much more are the opportunities.

Yeah, these "good" schools everyone talks about on this board may offer more opportunities. I mean, they probably have a better established business student society with lots of clubs, networking events or conferences that the society or school hosts. As a Laurier student, I know SBESS collects levy fees from the 4500+ students at our school making it one of the biggest funded biz student societies in Canada. Lots of opportunities right? Yeah sure.. only if you're good enough to even land a position. This year they hired for 63 spots with over 400 super-well rounded applicants.
I can imagine that the business societies at smaller schools have fewer spots for hire so even though there are less applicants the competition level is fractionally equivalent.

What about case competitions? I mean, I know someone in first year who did some lame accounting case competition no one cared about and after coming in 1st or 2nd she got hired as a student representative at CGA. I know someone else who got a job offer from investors group as a consultant after placing in business strat. Needless to say, they're amazing opportunities. I volunteered at JDC and checked out the database of delegates of the competition. Basically 90% of the students competing on the academic teams from Laurier, Dalhousie, REFAEC and Ivey were all 4th years. Rotman and Sprott followed with 75% 4th and 3rd years and then schools like Brock and Trent had a pretty even split of students allowing even 2nd years to compete. What this means is basically.. bigger schools like REFAEC (90% of all the Quebec universities) and Ivey (random fact Ivey only came in 2nd for finance losing to Dalhousie) only allow the best students to compete thus mostly 4th years.. I've talked to students who tried out for our JDC team at Laurier. It's a super competitive 5 round process starting with an interview, then a full 4 hour case prep with a team + presentation followed by peer evaluation/interviews and cuts, then a full case in 3 hour case prep + presentation and cuts then final presentation and cuts etc.. It's soo hard to get onto these teams since they are usually 3 person teams for each case subject yet the opportunities of growth and networking are priceless and will be a lot more accessible to students if they were from somewhere like Brock.

Wow I realized I rambled on for too long..

THE POINT IS.. these big name schools are great, there are opportunities and all that for sure but the competition can limit you so much more than the opportunities can let you grow. Sometimes I ask myself if I went to Brock (my 5th choice) or any other "similar" school would I make all the school job postings, case teams and council positions I was rejected from at Laurier?
We can all admit it, there are some variations between schools ranks when it comes to student performance. But what also matters is standing out in the respective school yourself.

Think about 2 artificial students; student A and student B. Student A is an Ivey grad who had some jr accounting position at KPMG and nothing else besides mediocre extracurriculars such as participating in a few clubs. This is because although he's a great student, he was unable to land any exec positions or be selected to represent Ivey in the case and conference competitions because his peers were better than him. Student B is from a lesser-known University (insert whatever here I feel bad for constantly using Brock) but managed to rank near the top of his class and thus was the VP of finance at his school's student society and landed 3 different good job positions. Student B also participated in big-name case competitions like ICBC, JDC and Royal Roads because he was the top of his class.
In the end, student B has an amazing resume while student A only has a small advantage in his "education" portion of his resume. I bet you most firms would prefer student B assuming they have roughly the same social/interview skills.

This is just something to think about.. I'm not saying hey lets go to Trent (or anywhere else ONCE AGAIN NOT DISSING ANY SCHOOLS HERE..) because we'll land better jobs from graduating there, I'm saying there's so much more than the school name and what they offer. If you judge schools by salary averages after ignoring all that bonus inflated crap, just realize that they're AVERAGES. Students going to Wharton are intelligent well rounded individuals already who would've likely received just as high as a salary if they went to another school anyways. It doesn't mean if you go to Queens and perform the same that you would've at Brock that you'll get better salaries/job offers, arguably you MIGHT even get better ones at Brock as you'll stand out.

Well, I feel like I'm starting to go in circles here and I'm posting way too much but I just had to throw this out there.

If you don't get into your "dream" school it's not the end of the world. If you do, then go there! there's nothing wrong with that.. just know that other schools are viable options as well.
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A photo of smarty1 smarty1
Good post.
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A photo of AZK AZK

@vincerz wrote
I thought about making a thread on this before but I always held back and decided not to. I thought I should at least make a brief post on it given that I could ramble on for hours on this topic..

It's very reasonable for high school students; especially business students to want to go to the best school they can get into. You worked hard in high school, if you got into Upenn obviously you would want to go there instead of some 75% cut off school, it makes sense. For some, it may be because they want the social recognition as an award for their hardwork.. you'll get to tell your family and friends you go to UofT or Queens, yipee!! For others it may be the ability to meet and fit into a class of peers that are all bound to be decently successful in life. Say.. getting to sit in an Ivey class and meeting the great finance leaders of tomorrow.

This is all great and may have it's benefits (e.g. networking and a bit more recruitment than other schools) but IN MY OPINION what means so much more are the opportunities.

Yeah, these "good" schools everyone talks about on this board may offer more opportunities. I mean, they probably have a better established business student society with lots of clubs, networking events or conferences that the society or school hosts. As a Laurier student, I know SBESS collects levy fees from the 4500+ students at our school making it one of the biggest funded biz student societies in Canada. Lots of opportunities right? Yeah sure.. only if you're good enough to even land a position. This year they hired for 63 spots with over 400 super-well rounded applicants.
I can imagine that the business societies at smaller schools have fewer spots for hire so even though there are less applicants the competition level is fractionally equivalent.

What about case competitions? I mean, I know someone in first year who did some lame accounting case competition no one cared about and after coming in 1st or 2nd she got hired as a student representative at CGA. I know someone else who got a job offer from investors group as a consultant after placing in business strat. Needless to say, they're amazing opportunities. I volunteered at JDC and checked out the database of delegates of the competition. Basically 90% of the students competing on the academic teams from Laurier, Dalhousie, REFAEC and Ivey were all 4th years. Rotman and Sprott followed with 75% 4th and 3rd years and then schools like Brock and Trent had a pretty even split of students allowing even 2nd years to compete. What this means is basically.. bigger schools like REFAEC (90% of all the Quebec universities) and Ivey (random fact Ivey only came in 2nd for finance losing to Dalhousie) only allow the best students to compete thus mostly 4th years.. I've talked to students who tried out for our JDC team at Laurier. It's a super competitive 5 round process starting with an interview, then a full 4 hour case prep with a team + presentation followed by peer evaluation/interviews and cuts, then a full case in 3 hour case prep + presentation and cuts then final presentation and cuts etc.. It's soo hard to get onto these teams since they are usually 3 person teams for each case subject yet the opportunities of growth and networking are priceless and will be a lot more accessible to students if they were from somewhere like Brock.

Wow I realized I rambled on for too long..

THE POINT IS.. these big name schools are great, there are opportunities and all that for sure but the competition can limit you so much more than the opportunities can let you grow. Sometimes I ask myself if I went to Brock (my 5th choice) or any other "similar" school would I make all the school job postings, case teams and council positions I was rejected from at Laurier?
We can all admit it, there are some variations between schools ranks when it comes to student performance. But what also matters is standing out in the respective school yourself.

Think about 2 artificial students; student A and student B. Student A is an Ivey grad who had some jr accounting position at KPMG and nothing else besides mediocre extracurriculars such as participating in a few clubs. This is because although he's a great student, he was unable to land any exec positions or be selected to represent Ivey in the case and conference competitions because his peers were better than him. Student B is from a lesser-known University (insert whatever here I feel bad for constantly using Brock) but managed to rank near the top of his class and thus was the VP of finance at his school's student society and landed 3 different good job positions. Student B also participated in big-name case competitions like ICBC, JDC and Royal Roads because he was the top of his class.
In the end, student B has an amazing resume while student A only has a small advantage in his "education" portion of his resume. I bet you most firms would prefer student B assuming they have roughly the same social/interview skills.

This is just something to think about.. I'm not saying hey lets go to Trent (or anywhere else ONCE AGAIN NOT DISSING ANY SCHOOLS HERE..) because we'll land better jobs from graduating there, I'm saying there's so much more than the school name and what they offer. If you judge schools by salary averages after ignoring all that bonus inflated crap, just realize that they're AVERAGES. Students going to Wharton are intelligent well rounded individuals already who would've likely received just as high as a salary if they went to another school anyways. It doesn't mean if you go to Queens and perform the same that you would've at Brock that you'll get better salaries/job offers, arguably you MIGHT even get better ones at Brock as you'll stand out.

Well, I feel like I'm starting to go in circles here and I'm posting way too much but I just had to throw this out there.

If you don't get into your "dream" school it's not the end of the world. If you do, then go there! there's nothing wrong with that.. just know that other schools are viable options as well.




From what I read, I conclude that you are basically stating that you rather be the biggest "midget", rather then the average "giant"

...Even though it might be great being the biggest/best in a "not as good" group, I feel it is much easier to just be average in a "slightly better" group

I doubt university is easier then high school, so I suggest that students should just excel in high school rather then procrastinate the work to university


i put quotations around these words as they are merely descriptions and does not depict the quality of the students or school

-"midget"
-"giant"
-"not as good"
-"slightly better"

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A photo of vincerz vincerz

@AZK wrote

@vincerz wrote
I thought about making a thread on this before but I always held back and decided not to. I thought I should at least make a brief post on it given that I could ramble on for hours on this topic..

It's very reasonable for high school students; especially business students to want to go to the best school they can get into. You worked hard in high school, if you got into Upenn obviously you would want to go there instead of some 75% cut off school, it makes sense. For some, it may be because they want the social recognition as an award for their hardwork.. you'll get to tell your family and friends you go to UofT or Queens, yipee!! For others it may be the ability to meet and fit into a class of peers that are all bound to be decently successful in life. Say.. getting to sit in an Ivey class and meeting the great finance leaders of tomorrow.

This is all great and may have it's benefits (e.g. networking and a bit more recruitment than other schools) but IN MY OPINION what means so much more are the opportunities.

Yeah, these "good" schools everyone talks about on this board may offer more opportunities. I mean, they probably have a better established business student society with lots of clubs, networking events or conferences that the society or school hosts. As a Laurier student, I know SBESS collects levy fees from the 4500+ students at our school making it one of the biggest funded biz student societies in Canada. Lots of opportunities right? Yeah sure.. only if you're good enough to even land a position. This year they hired for 63 spots with over 400 super-well rounded applicants.
I can imagine that the business societies at smaller schools have fewer spots for hire so even though there are less applicants the competition level is fractionally equivalent.

What about case competitions? I mean, I know someone in first year who did some lame accounting case competition no one cared about and after coming in 1st or 2nd she got hired as a student representative at CGA. I know someone else who got a job offer from investors group as a consultant after placing in business strat. Needless to say, they're amazing opportunities. I volunteered at JDC and checked out the database of delegates of the competition. Basically 90% of the students competing on the academic teams from Laurier, Dalhousie, REFAEC and Ivey were all 4th years. Rotman and Sprott followed with 75% 4th and 3rd years and then schools like Brock and Trent had a pretty even split of students allowing even 2nd years to compete. What this means is basically.. bigger schools like REFAEC (90% of all the Quebec universities) and Ivey (random fact Ivey only came in 2nd for finance losing to Dalhousie) only allow the best students to compete thus mostly 4th years.. I've talked to students who tried out for our JDC team at Laurier. It's a super competitive 5 round process starting with an interview, then a full 4 hour case prep with a team + presentation followed by peer evaluation/interviews and cuts, then a full case in 3 hour case prep + presentation and cuts then final presentation and cuts etc.. It's soo hard to get onto these teams since they are usually 3 person teams for each case subject yet the opportunities of growth and networking are priceless and will be a lot more accessible to students if they were from somewhere like Brock.

Wow I realized I rambled on for too long..

THE POINT IS.. these big name schools are great, there are opportunities and all that for sure but the competition can limit you so much more than the opportunities can let you grow. Sometimes I ask myself if I went to Brock (my 5th choice) or any other "similar" school would I make all the school job postings, case teams and council positions I was rejected from at Laurier?
We can all admit it, there are some variations between schools ranks when it comes to student performance. But what also matters is standing out in the respective school yourself.

Think about 2 artificial students; student A and student B. Student A is an Ivey grad who had some jr accounting position at KPMG and nothing else besides mediocre extracurriculars such as participating in a few clubs. This is because although he's a great student, he was unable to land any exec positions or be selected to represent Ivey in the case and conference competitions because his peers were better than him. Student B is from a lesser-known University (insert whatever here I feel bad for constantly using Brock) but managed to rank near the top of his class and thus was the VP of finance at his school's student society and landed 3 different good job positions. Student B also participated in big-name case competitions like ICBC, JDC and Royal Roads because he was the top of his class.
In the end, student B has an amazing resume while student A only has a small advantage in his "education" portion of his resume. I bet you most firms would prefer student B assuming they have roughly the same social/interview skills.

This is just something to think about.. I'm not saying hey lets go to Trent (or anywhere else ONCE AGAIN NOT DISSING ANY SCHOOLS HERE..) because we'll land better jobs from graduating there, I'm saying there's so much more than the school name and what they offer. If you judge schools by salary averages after ignoring all that bonus inflated crap, just realize that they're AVERAGES. Students going to Wharton are intelligent well rounded individuals already who would've likely received just as high as a salary if they went to another school anyways. It doesn't mean if you go to Queens and perform the same that you would've at Brock that you'll get better salaries/job offers, arguably you MIGHT even get better ones at Brock as you'll stand out.

Well, I feel like I'm starting to go in circles here and I'm posting way too much but I just had to throw this out there.

If you don't get into your "dream" school it's not the end of the world. If you do, then go there! there's nothing wrong with that.. just know that other schools are viable options as well.




From what I read, I conclude that you are basically stating that you rather be the biggest "midget", rather then the average "giant"

...Even though it might be great being the biggest/best in a "not as good" group, I feel it is much easier to just be average in a "slightly better" group

I doubt university is easier then high school, so I suggest that students should just excel in high school rather then procrastinate the work to university


i put quotations around these words as they are merely descriptions and does not depict the quality of the students or school

-"midget"
-"giant"
-"not as good"
-"slightly better"




Going to a school like Queens or Ivey doesn't make you a "giant". Likewise going to a school like Trent doesn't make you a "midget".

I'm talking about your actual resume and experience you build throughout your undergrad AKA what actually matters..
being average in a "slightly better" group as you call it basically just means you're average. Employers rarely care about your education especially if you're applying to the position externally outside of your school. They'll be like oh not bad.. Ivey but then focus on the other components of your resume/interview. And even if it's an internal recruitment because you go to a "target" school, it means you'll be competing with your peers and if you're "average" and the job position is an actual good one then.. well to be realistic your chances are slim.
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A photo of aimango aimango
OP had a long post but what is written is true. my aunt went to a not that well known school, but she was #1 at her school and ended up with a really prestigious job (she was in an accounting program). it's also easier to get better positions at a not that amazing school (less competition) in certain clubs/organizations.

example: afm at waterloo - it's very hard to get a good position in their organizations/clubs because the program is fricken competitive. everyone's got the same skills pretty much and they all want to expand their ECs...
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A photo of AZK AZK

@vincerz wrote

@AZK wrote

@vincerz wrote
I thought about making a thread on this before but I always held back and decided not to. I thought I should at least make a brief post on it given that I could ramble on for hours on this topic..

It's very reasonable for high school students; especially business students to want to go to the best school they can get into. You worked hard in high school, if you got into Upenn obviously you would want to go there instead of some 75% cut off school, it makes sense. For some, it may be because they want the social recognition as an award for their hardwork.. you'll get to tell your family and friends you go to UofT or Queens, yipee!! For others it may be the ability to meet and fit into a class of peers that are all bound to be decently successful in life. Say.. getting to sit in an Ivey class and meeting the great finance leaders of tomorrow.

This is all great and may have it's benefits (e.g. networking and a bit more recruitment than other schools) but IN MY OPINION what means so much more are the opportunities.

Yeah, these "good" schools everyone talks about on this board may offer more opportunities. I mean, they probably have a better established business student society with lots of clubs, networking events or conferences that the society or school hosts. As a Laurier student, I know SBESS collects levy fees from the 4500+ students at our school making it one of the biggest funded biz student societies in Canada. Lots of opportunities right? Yeah sure.. only if you're good enough to even land a position. This year they hired for 63 spots with over 400 super-well rounded applicants.
I can imagine that the business societies at smaller schools have fewer spots for hire so even though there are less applicants the competition level is fractionally equivalent.

What about case competitions? I mean, I know someone in first year who did some lame accounting case competition no one cared about and after coming in 1st or 2nd she got hired as a student representative at CGA. I know someone else who got a job offer from investors group as a consultant after placing in business strat. Needless to say, they're amazing opportunities. I volunteered at JDC and checked out the database of delegates of the competition. Basically 90% of the students competing on the academic teams from Laurier, Dalhousie, REFAEC and Ivey were all 4th years. Rotman and Sprott followed with 75% 4th and 3rd years and then schools like Brock and Trent had a pretty even split of students allowing even 2nd years to compete. What this means is basically.. bigger schools like REFAEC (90% of all the Quebec universities) and Ivey (random fact Ivey only came in 2nd for finance losing to Dalhousie) only allow the best students to compete thus mostly 4th years.. I've talked to students who tried out for our JDC team at Laurier. It's a super competitive 5 round process starting with an interview, then a full 4 hour case prep with a team + presentation followed by peer evaluation/interviews and cuts, then a full case in 3 hour case prep + presentation and cuts then final presentation and cuts etc.. It's soo hard to get onto these teams since they are usually 3 person teams for each case subject yet the opportunities of growth and networking are priceless and will be a lot more accessible to students if they were from somewhere like Brock.

Wow I realized I rambled on for too long..

THE POINT IS.. these big name schools are great, there are opportunities and all that for sure but the competition can limit you so much more than the opportunities can let you grow. Sometimes I ask myself if I went to Brock (my 5th choice) or any other "similar" school would I make all the school job postings, case teams and council positions I was rejected from at Laurier?
We can all admit it, there are some variations between schools ranks when it comes to student performance. But what also matters is standing out in the respective school yourself.

Think about 2 artificial students; student A and student B. Student A is an Ivey grad who had some jr accounting position at KPMG and nothing else besides mediocre extracurriculars such as participating in a few clubs. This is because although he's a great student, he was unable to land any exec positions or be selected to represent Ivey in the case and conference competitions because his peers were better than him. Student B is from a lesser-known University (insert whatever here I feel bad for constantly using Brock) but managed to rank near the top of his class and thus was the VP of finance at his school's student society and landed 3 different good job positions. Student B also participated in big-name case competitions like ICBC, JDC and Royal Roads because he was the top of his class.
In the end, student B has an amazing resume while student A only has a small advantage in his "education" portion of his resume. I bet you most firms would prefer student B assuming they have roughly the same social/interview skills.

This is just something to think about.. I'm not saying hey lets go to Trent (or anywhere else ONCE AGAIN NOT DISSING ANY SCHOOLS HERE..) because we'll land better jobs from graduating there, I'm saying there's so much more than the school name and what they offer. If you judge schools by salary averages after ignoring all that bonus inflated crap, just realize that they're AVERAGES. Students going to Wharton are intelligent well rounded individuals already who would've likely received just as high as a salary if they went to another school anyways. It doesn't mean if you go to Queens and perform the same that you would've at Brock that you'll get better salaries/job offers, arguably you MIGHT even get better ones at Brock as you'll stand out.

Well, I feel like I'm starting to go in circles here and I'm posting way too much but I just had to throw this out there.

If you don't get into your "dream" school it's not the end of the world. If you do, then go there! there's nothing wrong with that.. just know that other schools are viable options as well.




From what I read, I conclude that you are basically stating that you rather be the biggest "midget", rather then the average "giant"

...Even though it might be great being the biggest/best in a "not as good" group, I feel it is much easier to just be average in a "slightly better" group

I doubt university is easier then high school, so I suggest that students should just excel in high school rather then procrastinate the work to university


i put quotations around these words as they are merely descriptions and does not depict the quality of the students or school

-"midget"
-"giant"
-"not as good"
-"slightly better"




Going to a school like Queens or Ivey doesn't make you a "giant". Likewise going to a school like Trent doesn't make you a "midget".

I'm talking about your actual resume and experience you build throughout your undergrad AKA what actually matters..
being average in a "slightly better" group as you call it basically just means you're average. Employers rarely care about your education especially if you're applying to the position externally outside of your school. They'll be like oh not bad.. Ivey but then focus on the other components of your resume/interview. And even if it's an internal recruitment because you go to a "target" school, it means you'll be competing with your peers and if you're "average" and the job position is an actual good one then.. well to be realistic your chances are slim.



What makes you think that you can be the best in a less reputable university when you can only be average in a more reputable one?

-It takes very little effort to get into Ivey or Queens from highschool, however I am sure it will take a lot more effort to be the best at Brock

I was not putting down the schools in my post, all I was saying is that thinking that you will be the best in University just because you did ok in high school is whimsical
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A photo of vincerz vincerz
I never said anything about being "the best" at another school. It's just that it arguably would be a lot less competitive thus allowing you to build a great resume and gain experience.

That is why I went on for a a quarter of my post talking about case competitions. I actually saw the numbers at JDC; Ivey, Laurier and some other schools had their team consisting mostly of 4th years while Trent's team had a lot of 2nd and 3rd years. Sprott, Ryerson and Rotman were in the middle but at least had a few 2nd years where as Ivey and Laurier seriously had none.

These stats just carry over to other case competition or conferences. TD's Financial Case comp or KPMG's Ace the Case only allows 1-2 teams max from each school. Good luck getting on there.. you'll have to be in the top 5-10% of your class but the opportunities would be so worth it. Arguably, being in the top 5-10% of your class is easier at some schools than others, wouldn't you have to admit?
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A photo of AZK AZK

@vincerz wrote
I never said anything about being "the best" at another school. It's just that it arguably would be a lot less competitive thus allowing you to build a great resume and gain experience.

That is why I went on for a a quarter of my post talking about case competitions. I actually saw the numbers at JDC; Ivey, Laurier and some other schools had their team consisting mostly of 4th years while Trent's team had a lot of 2nd and 3rd years. Sprott, Ryerson and Rotman were in the middle but at least had a few 2nd years where as Ivey and Laurier seriously had none.

These stats just carry over to other case competition or conferences. TD's Financial Case comp or KPMG's Ace the Case only allows 1-2 teams max from each school. Good luck getting on there.. you'll have to be in the top 5-10% of your class but the opportunities would be so worth it. Arguably, being in the top 5-10% of your class is easier at some schools than others, wouldn't you have to admit?



LOL alright man you win, I admit defeat :p
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A photo of IanSharer IanSharer
Basically, if you don't think you can be the top amongst the "top tier" schools, it would better to go to a less competitive school in hopes of being amongst the top?

But if you're able to be among the top at a less competitive school, you'd probably have the ability to be above average in a "top tier" school. In that case, would you argue that being "above average" in a top school be better than being the top at a less competitive school? Because if you look at numbers, a lot more Ivey, Queens and, to a lesser extent, Schulich grads are able to land good positions.
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A photo of lemony lemony
And you didn't even mention how many more scholarships you could win at the lower tier universities. You are definitely making some good points to think about.
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A photo of g93 g93

@lemony wrote
And you didn't even mention how many more scholarships you could win at the lower tier universities. You are definitely making some good points to think about.


+ 1

And it's not "Don't go to a big-name school", it's "Don't get caught up with school names"
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A photo of Mar Mar
+1 Great points!

It is also better for you to go in the school which locates in Vancouver, Toronto, Motreal or Calgary. You will have an advantage over other students since it will be easier for you to network in a large city than in a small town.

I am not going to wait for employers to come to me. I will go to them first.
Most of the job positions are not advertised on the internet or in universities.

Also, most of the employers don't care whether you graduated from Queen's, UBC or Laurier.
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A photo of Machiavelli Machiavelli
Your success depends mostly on your hard work, not on your school name. Going to a target school like Ivey, though, will make your life a whole lot easier...
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A photo of g93 g93

@Machiavelli wrote
Your success depends mostly on your hard work, not on your school name. Going to a target school like Ivey, though, will make your life a whole lot easier...


Are you just here to promote Ivey or something?.... it seems that every single one of your posts includes a compliment of Ivey.
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A photo of AZK AZK
Well I don't know about the rest of you, but personally I am a very lazy person
I believe in taking short cuts in life, it might not necessary be a good thing to do so but I believe in achieving the most I can while putting forward as little effort as I can. And by going to a top tiered school it be much easier to succeed while remaining the norm.

IMO it will be much easier to succeed in schools like Ivey, Queens, and Schulich as being average norm, and from what I heard the average from those schools is quite satisfying

I personally don't believe that one can be the best by just trying their asses off, and frankly its just not worth it. Why go towards the route less taken, when the clearer and simpler path is readily available.

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A photo of andrewk512 andrewk512
Surrounding yourself with the best is both intrinsically satisfying as well as enables you to keep aspiring to greater things. By going to a lesser school, you are surrounding yourself with others who just don't care as much; it would be easy to fall into that trap. There is also less prestige. While you may get a few better opportunities, to me, there is something way more satisfying about doing the best and rising above the best, as opposed to taking the easy way. You also make it sound like the average or above average students at good schools don't get anywhere, which is completely ridiculous. Better schools also have better connections, why would someone scout Brock?
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A photo of AZK AZK

@andrewk512 wrote

@AZK wrote
I personally don't believe that one can be the best by just trying their asses off, and frankly its just not worth it. Why go towards the route less taken, when the clearer and simpler path is readily available.



Because surrounding yourself with the best is both intrinsically satisfying as well as enables you to keep aspiring to greater things. By going to a lesser school, you are surrounding yourself with others who just don't care as much; it would be easy to fall into that trap. There is also less prestige. While you may get a few better opportunities, to me, there is something way more satisfying about doing the best and rising above the best, as opposed to taking the easy way. You also make it sound like the average or above average students at good schools don't get anywhere, which is completely ridiculous. Better schools also have better connections, why would someone scout Brock?


Why go towards the route less taken, when the clearer and simpler path is readily available.


Going to a good school is actually the route taken more, and for good reason. It is rarer, and I would have to say misguided, that someone with good grades would go to a lesser school simply to get better grades.




O, I think you misunderstood me, when I was talking about the "clearer and simpler path" I was talking about the higher tier schools like Queens, ivey, etc

and I think you have my view points and the OP's viewpoint mixed up, I have been supportive of going to higher tiered schools this entire thread...
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Sorry, that was stupid, I should have read the names. =P
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Some valid points, but I get the feeling that they are skewed by the rationalization of a reject.

If you think a mediocre student at Wharton is worse off than Brock's cream of the crop, then you are deluded. But if you barely make it into Queen's or Ivey intending to skim by 4 years, then I would agree that another university is a better choice.

Regardless, a successful student will succeed wherever, and the top Queen's and Ivey students will claim the pinnacle of opportunity and fortune.
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@andrewk512 wrote
Surrounding yourself with the best is both intrinsically satisfying as well as enables you to keep aspiring to greater things. By going to a lesser school, you are surrounding yourself with others who just don't care as much; it would be easy to fall into that trap. There is also less prestige. While you may get a few better opportunities, to me, there is something way more satisfying about doing the best and rising above the best, as opposed to taking the easy way. You also make it sound like the average or above average students at good schools don't get anywhere, which is completely ridiculous. Better schools also have better connections, why would someone scout Brock?



Exactly. +1
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@AZK wrote
Well I don't know about the rest of you, but personally I am a very lazy person
I believe in taking short cuts in life, it might not necessary be a good thing to do so but I believe in achieving the most I can while putting forward as little effort as I can. And by going to a top tiered school it be much easier to succeed while remaining the norm.

IMO it will be much easier to succeed in schools like Ivey, Queens, and Schulich as being average norm, and from what I heard the average from those schools is quite satisfying

I personally don't believe that one can be the best by just trying their asses off, and frankly its just not worth it. Why go towards the route less taken, when the clearer and simpler path is readily available.




You should probably lose that attitude for university in general. If you do to go a "top" school you'll be pressured to lose it which is one of the pros of attending a good school as andrewk512 covered.

But as for the prestige and "route" factors (it's so hard to get this across to high school kids but thankfully some people on this forum recognize it too) they have soo little impact. And the true route you take would be more accurate by basing it off the amount of effort you choose to put in and the resulting rewards, NOT which school you go to.

@Andrewk512
yeah it's true there are still opportunities at schools if you're an average student. It still looks good to just be a member in a few clubs, maybe take part in smaller case competitions etc. I was just trying to get my point across in my first post that it can be EASIER to get GREAT opportunities at "lesser" schools.

As someone already covered for me.. I'm not saying to not go to big name schools, just don't get caught up with them and think OUTSIDE of the box.

As for QC and Ivey promotoers..
I usually try to refrain from bashing on other schools but ignorant comments like
"top Queen's and Ivey students will claim the pinnacle of opportunity and fortune" suggesting that top students at other schools aren't on the same level?..

Ivey sent a tiny team of their best students to JDC for business strat (most competitive event) and finance ignoring all the other categories since they're sore losers who can't deal with not getting 1st. Too bad they didn't even win a gold medal in either event; they placed in 2nd in finance losing to Dalhousie and 3rd in business strat taken over by WLU.

Queens' primary excuse to not participate in JDC central or west is because they host ICBC every year, and though yes it is the oldest most prestigious case comp in the country, QC gets their ass wooped by schools out west like UBC year after year. Last time they dominated was like in the 90s.. lol. Funny how Ivey doesn't even take part in ICBC or just never placed. It's like these two schools are too afraid to compete against each other in anything..

edit: Royal Roads backs up that last point http://business.school.royalroads.ca/case-competition/past-participants
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"top Queen's and Ivey students will claim the pinnacle of opportunity and fortune" suggesting that top Queen's and Ivey students are unparalleled when compared to the same upper fraction of other universities, in terms of the having the majority and the best of lucrative opportunities. Do you disagree?
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yeah it's true there are still opportunities at schools if you're an average student. It still looks good to just be a member in a few clubs, maybe take part in smaller case competitions etc. I was just trying to get my point across in my first post that it can be EASIER to get GREAT opportunities at "lesser" schools.




I will bet you that you will have a hard time getting GREAT opportunities at WLU as it is Canada's largest undergrad business program boosting the most students. The students attending WLU are just as competitive as the students attending Queens, Ivey, Schulich.

I am not trying to bash WLU it is a great school, but it is just funny how you seem to believe that you easily can be the best in schools like WLU. It almost seems like you are looking down on these schools.
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@Alizarin wrote
"top Queen's and Ivey students will claim the pinnacle of opportunity and fortune" suggesting that top Queen's and Ivey students are unparalleled when compared to the same upper fraction of other universities, in terms of the having the majority and the best of lucrative opportunities. Do you disagree?

From the impetus of your original rant, I would imagine that you aren't doing exceptionally well at Schulich?



He's from Laurier.
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@RichardFuld wrote

@Alizarin wrote
"top Queen's and Ivey students will claim the pinnacle of opportunity and fortune" suggesting that top Queen's and Ivey students are unparalleled when compared to the same upper fraction of other universities, in terms of the having the majority and the best of lucrative opportunities. Do you disagree?

From the impetus of your original rant, I would imagine that you aren't doing exceptionally well at Schulich?



He's from Laurier.



Oh my bad .. then what is he ranting about? :scratch:
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A photo of RichardFuld RichardFuld

@Alizarin wrote

@RichardFuld wrote

@Alizarin wrote
"top Queen's and Ivey students will claim the pinnacle of opportunity and fortune" suggesting that top Queen's and Ivey students are unparalleled when compared to the same upper fraction of other universities, in terms of the having the majority and the best of lucrative opportunities. Do you disagree?

From the impetus of your original rant, I would imagine that you aren't doing exceptionally well at Schulich?



He's from Laurier.



Oh my bad .. then what is he ranting about? :scratch:



Probably just trying to make himself feel better.
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