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Don't Know What to Apply to.

A photo of ManUtd123 ManUtd123
Admissions are coming more soon for us Grade 12 students and I still don't know what program(s) to apply for. It would be cool if any of you people could give me some guidance on what to apply for. My classes consist of physics, chemistry, biology, advanced functions, and calculus. I still don't know my exact passion/interests. It would be cool if some of you could name some reputable programs (doesn't matter what area, science, business, engineering--it doesn't matter). I'd just like to get an overview of all things. Thanks.
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A photo of Victorinox Victorinox
Hi!

Although I'm in grade twelve this year just like you, I can definitely share some insight on some of the popular/reputable programs in Ontario. If you're interested in engineering, UofT and Waterloo have excellent programs. The Engineering Science program at UofT is a very competitive and sought after program. Apparently, it is the best engineering program in Canada (according to a UofT representative, could be biased though :P). If you're interested in life/health sciences, some of the common programs students apply to are Queens life sci, Mcmaster life sci, Mcmaster Health Sci, Western Biomed, UofT life sci, Guelph, and York. Mac health sci is definitely the most competitive, with an admission average last year of just over 95%, however, there is a supplementary application that plays a huge role in your acceptance. For business, it is generally accepted that the top 3 business schools in Canada are Ivey (at western), Schulich (at york), and Queens, in no particular order. These programs all require pretty high averages (87+ for queens and 90+ for ivey and schulich) in addition to great extra curriculars. Of course, there are tons of other excellent programs out there, and if you're interested, one or two hours on Google will provide you with a plethora of useful information :). Hope this helped and good luck applying this year!


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A photo of jelly jelly
cutoff =/= admission average.
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A photo of Victorinox Victorinox



Yes you are correct that the cutoff is 90 % every year. However, the admission average last year was 95.4%. I remember seeing that number on Macs website somewhere, but I can't font the statistic anymore.
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A photo of Victorinox Victorinox
Well I wouldn't really say marks don't matter once you hit 90, as marks are used as a tie breaker in the case of a tie for the supplementary app. I would assume that ties happen pretty often since your score is an average of only 3 numbers, each ranging from 1-7. The question is how often are 7s, or even 6s or 5s, are given out?
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A photo of Toronto12 Toronto12

@ManUtd123 wrote
Admissions are coming more soon for us Grade 12 students and I still don't know what program(s) to apply for. It would be cool if any of you people could give me some guidance on what to apply for. My classes consist of physics, chemistry, biology, advanced functions, and calculus. I still don't know my exact passion/interests. It would be cool if some of you could name some reputable programs (doesn't matter what area, science, business, engineering--it doesn't matter). I'd just like to get an overview of all things. Thanks.



Lol I had the same situation as you two years ago. I was stuck between choosing sciences, business or any program. Here's a background of my situation;

During my final year, I was fairly good at sciences and thought of applying to life science programs. However, I was concerned I may not even survive university life sciences since my grades for sciences were only mid-80s. On the other hand, I found business more fun or easier, so I decided to apply to some business programs as well. The courses I took were; chem, bio, cal, advanced functions, English, accounting, sports marketing, and religion which allows me to apply to two different types of programs. Unfortunately, I still did not know what I wanted and applied to 8 university programs; 4 for business programs ranging from york to Uoft, and 4 for life science programs ranging from UofT to Waterloo.

Eventually as acceptance letters rolled in, I was running out of time to pick offers and had to ask myself what I really wanted to study. I decided to stick with business just because I had fun doing the courses, it's easier and more possible job opportunities.

So here's the program analysis I used to decided what I really liked about the 2-3 different paths; (Maybe you can use something similar to tell yourself what you like)

Science programs
-You spend almost 30-40 hours per week with labs, tutorials, lectures
- Since sciences usually specializes in a certain field and your opportunities
to try something new or different after you graduate will be limited
-Jobs are usually very stable and aren't very sensitive to economic forces
-High competition to enter med and grad schools

Business programs
-You spend 10-15 hours per week with tutorials and lectures
- By getting a BBA or Bcomm you have more opportunity in work. (Think logically;
even medical research and medicine companies will require management and administators
positions to operate; so the chances of being employed under a business environment outweighs science positions).
-However they are very unstable and are very sensitive to economic forces. Chances are they will fire you instead of an engineer or a researcher.
-Very High competition due to vast amount of business programs and less need to specialize (usually 4-6 years of university and you enter work force)

Anyways of the two, I chose business over sciences in the end :P (It was actually due to the interest and less workload xD). However, it is your decision to chose whatever program you like because whatever program that you'll be taking, will affect the future career, life style and work you do. Think carefully.

Good luck




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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Science and business are not your only option. You should sit down with a guidance counsellor and discuss your interests, strengths and weaknesses. None of us here know you, only the courses you are taking. There are a variety of fields such as forensics, kinesiology, forestry, veterinary medicine, nursing, architecture, arts/social sciences, computer technology, etc. Money matters but also choose a career you can see yourself doing and how many years you want to spend in university.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
I feel that the choice of whether to major in science vs. business is not about what types of careers they may lead to, but rather what types of skill-sets and "tool kits" you will gain through your university education. You often see business, science and engineering majors tackle the same problems our societies faces, but each bring a different perspective, method and area of expertise. Since you do not know what you're interested in, I frankly suggest that you simply apply to the most prestigious and difficult program you can get in, because even if you end up not liking the area of study, at least you won't also feel depressed about being with a bunch of retards.

That being said, I believe that the tool-kits and skill sets that are gained through a science education are superior and far more widely applicable than one gained through a business studies major. It is the overwhelming trend that the brightest and most motivated students usually (but not always) tends to go into math, science and engineering disciplines. If you look at the world's richest men, excluding those who inherited their wealth, a large number of them tended to major in especially engineering, but also maths, economics, computer science, physics and chemistry. Paradoxically few business majors ever ended up in that list.

Anyway take my comments with a grain of salt. I am pretty biased.
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