yconic - Extracurricular Activities and Involvement
Hide Menu

My Feed Money for School Student Help Brands Winners Support Center



Explore yconic
Explore Student Life Topics
Scotiabank
STUDENT CHAMPION
yconic proudly recognizes Student Champion Partners who are providing our community with superior support for their student journeys. Learn More
Student Help Brands

Extracurricular Activities and Involvement

A photo of origamiprincess origamiprincess
I am extremely involved in my high school, and would like to continue my commitment to my school community when I go to university next year. However, I realize that I will already be extremely busy with all of my classes, adjusting to the new environment etc... So my question is: As a general member in something like an environmental/humanitarian club, or some form of student government, how much of a time commitment is generally necessary? Are meetings usually once a week or more often? Do members have the freedom to only come to certain meetings, and be less involved in times when they feel they need to focus more on other things? I want to make sure that I can make a difference and still achieve academically. =)

Thank you in advance for all of your replies!
Was this helpful? Yes 0
10 replies
 
A photo of inthemaking inthemaking
General member meetings are typically twice a month, monthly or may be on a as-needed basis. Most clubs are quite large and attendance isn't taken or anything so members may come to all or just a select few of the meetings.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Origami, you're asking questions that are better answered by the club or organization of interest.

Off the record, though, student government is usually the most effort-involving role. It's even more true for a post-secondary institution. However, that shouldn't discourage you because there are untold benefits from being involved in student government-usually, non-tangible benefits that help you over the long run.

On the other hand, some organizations hardly do anything at all, so it's to your benefit to actually research into this.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of elissa elissa
Do your own research on school websites or in schools. Everything is a lot different than highschool, you'd be surprised.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of macpherson184 macpherson184
Usually the school will host a couple of club days where all new clubs will advertise their clubs in one big space so that students can tour and get a sense of everything offered. From there, you can ask specific questions such as time commitment and things of that nature and get a feel for how much time you will be able to offer. In most cases, clubs start off with huge numbers of members at the beginning of the year but as weeks go by the numbers dwindle as students either forget, lose interest, or simply realize they don't have the time, so time commitments will always vary depending on how many members the club has. Also, from my experience as a first year student, most clubs already consist of members that have been involved for many years already, so I found that when I joined a few clubs, they were sort of clique-ish in a way that most of the new members were simply harnessed in for the man-power (eg. setting up, doing all of the tasks the senior members didn't want to do), as the actual committees were formed before the new school year began before summer break began; so unless the club your planning on joining is in need of committee members, chances are you will be signed in as a volunteer, which means your committment hours may not be as extensive as they would be if you were on the board.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of MegWidmeyer MegWidmeyer
the great thing about extra curricular activities in university is that they understand how busy you are and how much you have to study and commit your time to classes so they're fairly understanding about meetings being every once in awhile and fitting into people's schedules.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of cat11 cat11
Universities are understanding of everyones schedules and it would be best to contact the club yo would liek to join as they would have the most information and can answer your questions.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of lwolff lwolff
I wish that more school had cheerleading squads. I wonder how would you propose asking the sports department to start up a cheerleading squad and get interest in it?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Jessica888 Jessica888
In my first year of university, I was a member of eight different clubs. Like you, I was super involved in high school and carried that mindset over! There are several clubs (I only had one that fell in this category) that you have to apply for (ie. student government or various centers around campus) and those tend to have more mandatory attendance and be more time consuming. If you're simply speaking about general clubs, however, it's very flexible. Most of mine had a meeting once a week that lasted anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour and a half. If you can't attend, just get filled in later. There were weeks when we'd have a booth or event, where I'd help out more, but if you have a lot going on and can't help, that's alright too. It's a volunteer position, after all, and everyone else there knows what it's like to be a student with various commitments.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of NumberOne NumberOne
Anyone know how the Student Government of UOttawa is? Specifically, the Poli Sci Student Government?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@NumberOne wrote
Anyone know how the Student Government of UOttawa is? Specifically, the Poli Sci Student Government?


They're two different things: the student government at U of O is left-wing nutjobs, like most student governments. There is a political science student association, but that's not a student government.
Was this helpful? Yes 0