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Getting an MBA after bachelors degree?

A photo of ac123 ac123
hey guys, I just wanted to know that does it make a difference if I pick a b com, BBA, or AFM at Waterloo if i want my MBA afterwards? I know on the Waterloo website specifically it is stated that you can get your CA,CMA, and CFA, but what about others like the MBA? I'm asking this because I plan on going into something in business administration in management or finance as far as i know as of right now.


Thanks for all your help in advance! :)
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A photo of g93 g93
First: CA, CMA and CFA are professional designations. An MBA is a masters degree that you would receive from a university. They are completely different. The three designations have an accreditation process that includes requirements that can be fulfilled by completing a degree (eg Waterloo's BAFM and/or MAcc or Diploma program) or can be completed while you finish your undergrad (eg exams, work experience).

MBA degrees were designed for people without business backgrounds (eg people with backgrounds in engineering, medicine, etc.). Most of what you learn (content-wise) in and MBA program will be covered in your undergrad business program (although the way in which it is presented could vary). There are benefits that could be had from completing your MBA at a reputable school after you have finished your undergrad in business (note that one of the major requirements for admission to MBA programs is usually work experience). However, in many cases, it's completely unnecessary. I'm not going to pretend that I know when it's a good decision to pursue and MBA and when it's not, so I will just suggest that you not worry about it now. Keep it in the back of your mind, and in 3-4 years you can re-evaluate. There's also a whole debate of "are the potential benefits of having my MBA greater than the losses I will take by leaving my job for 1-2 years and having to shell out big bucks for tuition?" I wouldn't be worrying about that just yet if I were you.

There are a few people who go from Waterloo AFM or the MAcc program to an MBA program btw (although not always immediately). If you're not sure of the whole business vs accounting vs finance deal, there are lots of people you can ask at Waterloo about it, as it's definitely not an unheard of problem.
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A photo of Nick0rz Nick0rz
Biggest benefit of an MBA is the network you get. Its great for people who are looking to jump into a different career path (eg, looking to go from accounting to consulting), or who maybe graduated at a lower level undergrad school and are looking to gain the network from say Ivey or UofT. There's a lot of people who an MBA wouldn't be beneficial for, but there's those who it would be great for.

Like g93 said, traditionally an MBA was more for non business backgrounds, however recently BBAs have made up a large chunk of the people who get MBAs.
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred

MBA degrees were designed for people without business backgrounds (eg people with backgrounds in engineering, medicine, etc.). Most of what you learn (content-wise) in and MBA program will be covered in your undergrad business program (although the way in which it is presented could vary). There are benefits that could be had from completing your MBA at a reputable school after you have finished your undergrad in business (note that one of the major requirements for admission to MBA programs is usually work experience). However, in many cases, it's completely unnecessary. I'm not going to pretend that I know when it's a good decision to pursue and MBA and when it's not, so I will just suggest that you not worry about it now. Keep it in the back of your mind, and in 3-4 years you can re-evaluate. There's also a whole debate of "are the potential benefits of having my MBA greater than the losses I will take by leaving my job for 1-2 years and having to shell out big bucks for tuition?" I wouldn't be worrying about that just yet if I were you.




I was just about to type this out practically verbatim. Signed.
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