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GPA

A photo of riverheart1118 riverheart1118
How do I calculate my GPA. I know it is a little bit different everywhere but Im applying to many scholarships that aske for my GPA and Im not sure how I can calculate it. I've visited many websites about it and it is never the same. Could anybody show me a good but way to calculate my GPA so I can submit it on scholarship applications?
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16 replies
 
A photo of experiencer experiencer
I would suggest that you ask your school counselor about that! Good luck! =)
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A photo of aseifert aseifert
You can usually find it on your school website
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A photo of aseifert aseifert
You can usually find it on your school website
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A photo of ardron11 ardron11
Your registrar office should be able to help
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A photo of adrover adrover
Well then, ask a councillor or something at your school. That's the only way you'll know how it's done there.
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A photo of mirandat mirandat
No luck asking here :S
Try asking your counsellors for help, that's why they're there :)
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A photo of obviouslyNewb obviouslyNewb
dont you just add up all ur grade% & divide it by how many courses u have? its like taking the average of something. ie) math:86%; eng:89%; chem:90% >>86+89+90=265/3=88.3% and your GPA would be like 3.40, on a scale of 4.00

but yea, you should talk to your councilor first :P
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Your GPA is calculated by dividing the total amount of grade points earned by the total amount of credit hours attempted. Your grade point average may range from 0.0 to a 4.0.

http://www.back2college.com/gpa.htm <- this is a good link with a GPA calculator. Hope this helps :cheers:
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A photo of riverheart1118 riverheart1118
I've been told by a friend who had a similar problem and asked about seeing my guidance counsellor, she said that when she asked about calculating her GPA they had no idea. Any other suggestions?
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo

@obviouslyNewb wrote
dont you just add up all ur grade% & divide it by how many courses u have? its like taking the average of something. ie) math:86%; eng:89%; chem:90% >>86+89+90=265/3=88.3% and your GPA would be like 3.40, on a scale of 4.00

but yea, you should talk to your councilor first :P



Haha. That's not at all what it's like.

1. Pull up this trustworthy chart: http://careers.mcmaster.ca/students/education-planning/virtual-resources/gpa-conversion-chart

2. Take all your marks and convert them to individual course GPAs according to that chart.

3. Take a weighted average, according to credits, of those individual course GPAs. That weighted average is your GPA.

e.g. I took four courses this year and received the following marks: 87, 73, 79, and 82. Corresponding GPAs = 3.9, 3.0, 3.3, and 3.7. The first two marks were in full-year courses, the last two were in half-year courses. Therefore, multiply the last two by 0.5 and then add the two products together. So (3.3x0.5) + (3.7x0.5) = 3.5. The marks are now fairly weighted. So 3.9 + 3.0 + 3.5 all divided by 3 = 3.47. Therefore, your GPA is 3.47.
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A photo of LisaWan LisaWan
Well technically, both of you are right, but it depends on what you're looking for;if you're trying to find the average percentage then you do find the sum of the percentages from your classes, and then you divide that by the number of courses. Some people actually look for the GPA though, like for example 4.0 GPA. For me, each letter grade had a different GPA number/value. A=4, B=3. Your counselor will know which you should be looking for though.
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A photo of nc2chicken nc2chicken
It should be on your school website. What you can do is just search up on google "GPA grade scale for (Enter your school name here)" and if you're lucky, your school's GPA grade scale will be the first thing that pops up! :)
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo

@LisaWan wrote
Well technically, both of you are right, but it depends on what you're looking for;if you're trying to find the average percentage then you do find the sum of the percentages from your classes, and then you divide that by the number of courses.



I agree with you, but no need to make it any more complicated than it already is, apparently. 99% of the time when a school asks for your GPA, they are asking for it in scaled values (usually 0-4.0), not percentage values.
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A photo of g93 g93

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote

@obviouslyNewb wrote
dont you just add up all ur grade% & divide it by how many courses u have? its like taking the average of something. ie) math:86%; eng:89%; chem:90% >>86+89+90=265/3=88.3% and your GPA would be like 3.40, on a scale of 4.00

but yea, you should talk to your councilor first :P



Haha. That's not at all what it's like.

1. Pull up this trustworthy chart: http://careers.mcmaster.ca/students/education-planning/virtual-resources/gpa-conversion-chart

2. Take all your marks and convert them to individual course GPAs according to that chart.

3. Take a weighted average, according to credits, of those individual course GPAs. That weighted average is your GPA.

e.g. I took four courses this year and received the following marks: 87, 73, 79, and 82. Corresponding GPAs = 3.9, 3.0, 3.3, and 3.7. The first two marks were in full-year courses, the last two were in half-year courses. Therefore, multiply the last two by 0.5 and then add the two products together. So (3.3x0.5) + (3.7x0.5) = 3.5. The marks are now fairly weighted. So 3.9 + 3.0 + 3.5 all divided by 3 = 3.47. Therefore, your GPA is 3.47.



Most schools seem to use the 7 or 3 (they seem the same except one is letter grades and one is percent). So having a 90 and having 100- there's really no difference between them. That is kind of weird. And going from 84 to 85 bumps it up 0.2... crazy.
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