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Grade 12 courses to take for Engineering

A photo of applesnack applesnack
I'm a grade 11 student and here are the grade 12 courses I've picked so far: AF, Calc & vectors, English, Physics, Chem, Bio. I was thinking about switching out of bio for a tech course....would that be helpful? What I'm trying to say is, will I have a better chance of getting into engineering by taking either an engineering tech course or a 12U bio course? Wouldn't universities like it better if i took bio because its harder and it shows how well rounded my interests are? But taking an engineering tech class shows how 'experienced' I am with the type of engineering program I wanna get into?I will most likely apply to ECE or nanotech, so I'd probly take the grade 12 computer engineering tech class
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A photo of iRamie iRamie
All your courses look fantastic except for bio (Why waste your time in it, when you aren't even going into the field).

Take a course like TEJ, you will learn about electronics and robotics (Well atleast in my school board, thats the curriculum). Last year we learned about microcontrollers and digital circuits, it was an awesome course. It will definitely help you first year if you go into any Electrical/Mechanical/Computer engineering.

Another course i would recommend is ICS4U, the computer science course. It will give you great fundamental knowledge for programming in university. Again, this depends on your school, but my school prepares us really well for next year. We learned 3 languages throughout highschool ICS courses at my school.

Its all up to you, if those are the only 6 courses you took, i suggest you take ICS AND TEJ and get use to the workload for next year (University) :D
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
^
I wouldn't say taking bio is a COMPLETE waste of time, but ICS4U1 is easily 16014718976x more useful. It's pretty easy and even though it might be completely childish compared to what you'll learn in university, some programming experience is better than none. My brother told me his only regret in high school was not having taken a programming course before he went o Waterloo for engineering. :)
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Universities require 6 U/M courses that count toward your top 6. They require Adv Func, Calc and Vectors, Chemistry, English, and Physics. The other can be any U/M course. They won't favor someone that took 12U Bio over someone that took 12M Accounting. I would recommend a course that will help you next year. If you are planning Biotech or something close to that, take Bio. Otherwise take tech. But no, they will not favor one course over another (maybe unless they recommend you take it).
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A photo of applesnack applesnack
Thanks guys, you're very helpful.
I took 12U bio because i thought it was interesting and maybe it would help me get into engineering (but now I know that the latter is untrue). I am currently taking TEJ3MI so next year i will be able to switch into TEJ4MI. However, I only took ICS2OI and that was last year in grade 10; and I can't take it this year because then I would have to drop 11U bio. I don't want to drop 11U bio because I know I'm gonna learn alotta pretty cool stuff that'll be helpful in life. I've heard that from friends who have taken bio and it seems to be true so far. Do I really need to take ICS? Do you have to do alot of difficult programming from the very beginning? Do you get beginner lessons or sumthin?
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A photo of ninetyfour ninetyfour

@applesnack wrote
Do I really need to take ICS? Do you have to do alot of difficult programming from the very beginning? Do you get beginner lessons or sumthin?



It depends. You are not required by any means to have ICS for Engineering. However, if you, for example, plan on applying to Software Engineering at Waterloo, they do require you to be able to demonstrate knowledge in programming. This knowledge can be demonstrated through taking a course like ICS, or work experience or performance in a contest, etc.

I'm talking specifically about UW SE because I know that in first year, you skip the introductory CS course, so they do expect you to know things. I don't know if it's the same elsewhere.

If you're not applying to SE, then you don't need to take it at all if you don't want to.
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A photo of applesnack applesnack
[quote=ninetyfour
If you're not applying to SE, then you don't need to take it at all if you don't want to.
[/quote]

Ok, thanks. I wasn't planning on applying to SE anyways. Either ECE or nanotech
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A photo of whatthe whatthe
Are you considering Engineering Science at UofT, it has a nanotech option after second year. You're forced through a bio course, so I'm not sure if you wanna miss out on Bio if you are going into Engineering Science -> Nanotech Stream after 2nd yr.
Otherwise, bio does not need to be in your top 6, so take another EASY course, that you will do well in!
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A photo of applesnack applesnack

@whatthe wrote
Are you considering Engineering Science at UofT, it has a nanotech option after second year.


Wow, i wasnt even aware of this program, I thought there was simply nanoengineering from first year at UofT. Is this it? or is this different? I might apply there then, although my top choice is waterloo, and then mcmaster. Thanks
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A photo of MDM93 MDM93

@applesnack wrote

@whatthe wrote
Are you considering Engineering Science at UofT, it has a nanotech option after second year.


Wow, i wasnt even aware of this program, I thought there was simply nanoengineering from first year at UofT. Is this it? or is this different? I might apply there then, although my top choice is waterloo, and then mcmaster. Thanks



If I remember correctly engsci at UofT splits in the second year into different strands (nanotech,aerospace, etc.). I'm not too sure though, as I didn't apply for eng sci.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Those courses are perfect. For ECE it would probably be advantageous to take a programming course like ICS4U (Ontario) as there will be aspects of programming courses in the ECE program. I believe Waterloo wants their students to do an introductory programming course in university which involves C++. However, I believe Biology would only be helpful if you were planning on bioengineering or the biology area of nanotechnology. Even then it would probably be much better to take another course.

A rule of thumb: if it's not a prerequisite it probably won't be needed. Although taking courses which are related to engineering or technical will be better because it will show your interest in what you're applying to and thus make you a little more appealing when sending in an application.
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When applying to U of T you'll want to apply to the EngSci. It is a broad first (and second) year which opens you up to all their specializations: EC, nano, biomedical, aero etc.. However, it is a lot harder as you need to cover so much in only two years. U of T will also let you pick 4 alternates which the faculty will automatically look at you for if you don't get into your first choice (this is called an alternate, if you read this anywhere like: alternate geoeng.).

Waterloo allows you two alternates. You can apply directly to their nanotech eng program, I believe you cannot chose software eng as an alternate. I've handed in my AIF (Admission Information Form) in the end of December so I can't remember about that.
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A photo of applesnack applesnack

@MrSparkles wrote
U of T will also let you pick 4 alternates which the faculty will automatically look at you for if you don't get into your first choice (this is called an alternate, if you read this anywhere like: alternate geoeng.).

Waterloo allows you two alternates.



So the alternates do NOT count as part of the 3 programs you apply for at the university? and EngSci at UofT sounds very interesting! I dont want to do SE anyways to i wont be applying to that, and is there a reason why you cant pick SE as an alternate?
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A photo of applesnack applesnack

@MrSparkles wrote

A rule of thumb: if it's not a prerequisite it probably won't be needed. Although taking courses which are related to engineering or technical will be better because it will show your interest in what you're applying to and thus make you a little more appealing when sending in an application.



Ok thanks, but im not sure if i wanna go into engineering just yet which is why i also took biology. But if during the summer I decide i only want to do engineering (ECE, nanotech) then I will drop bio and take TEJ4MI and ICS 3MI
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A photo of brady23 brady23

@applesnack wrote
I'm a grade 11 student and here are the grade 12 courses I've picked so far: AF, Calc & vectors, English, Physics, Chem, Bio. I was thinking about switching out of bio for a tech course....would that be helpful? What I'm trying to say is, will I have a better chance of getting into engineering by taking either an engineering tech course or a 12U bio course? Wouldn't universities like it better if i took bio because its harder and it shows how well rounded my interests are? But taking an engineering tech class shows how 'experienced' I am with the type of engineering program I wanna get into?I will most likely apply to ECE or nanotech, so I'd probly take the grade 12 computer engineering tech class



Drop Bio. Even if you can get a 90 in bio, it will be a hard 90 to get because you need to dedicate A LOT of your time to get good results.

Take something more related to your field like Computer Engineering or Computer Science. Universities don't require you to know Computer Science, but if you have prior programming knowledge, it will probably help you quite a bit in your intro programming courses.

If you can't take any of those courses take an average booster. Something you know you can get a 90 in easily because it's a shame when you pick an elective and can only get a 78 in it or something. It's suppose to increase your average, bump your 89 to a 90. Any tech course or business leadership or international business is usually quite easy. Good luck!
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@applesnack wrote

@MrSparkles wrote
U of T will also let you pick 4 alternates which the faculty will automatically look at you for if you don't get into your first choice (this is called an alternate, if you read this anywhere like: alternate geoeng.).

Waterloo allows you two alternates.



So the alternates do NOT count as part of the 3 programs you apply for at the university? and EngSci at UofT sounds very interesting! I dont want to do SE anyways to i wont be applying to that, and is there a reason why you cant pick SE as an alternate?




The alternates count for just one application to that university.

For example;

I applied to the University of Waterloo for Electrical Engineering on my OUAC application.
After that, Waterloo sent me a username for their online portal (an online 'website' that you use to get information on what you need to do) which is called Quest, for more info on it and a better idea of what it is search it up. In Quest I, among other prospective students, had to fill out an AIF. On this form is an option to select two other courses that you would like to be considered for, mine had to be in engineering.

I wasn't sure about the SE being allowed or not, I didn't pay much attention to that as I applied to nano and chem for my alternates. It may be helpful if you were to find out from someone who is more confident on their answer.

So basically, some universities will allow you to pick multiple alternates from one application. Queen's requires a completely different application if you wanted to be looked at for a different course.

Fortunately for me I have been given an offer for my first choices in each university.
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A photo of applesnack applesnack

@MrSparkles wrote

@applesnack wrote

@MrSparkles wrote
U of T will also let you pick 4 alternates which the faculty will automatically look at you for if you don't get into your first choice (this is called an alternate, if you read this anywhere like: alternate geoeng.).

Waterloo allows you two alternates.



So the alternates do NOT count as part of the 3 programs you apply for at the university? and EngSci at UofT sounds very interesting! I dont want to do SE anyways to i wont be applying to that, and is there a reason why you cant pick SE as an alternate?




The alternates count for just one application to that university.

For example;

I applied to the University of Waterloo for Electrical Engineering on my OUAC application.
After that, Waterloo sent me a username for their online portal (an online 'website' that you use to get information on what you need to do) which is called Quest, for more info on it and a better idea of what it is search it up. In Quest I, among other prospective students, had to fill out an AIF. On this form is an option to select two other courses that you would like to be considered for, mine had to be in engineering.

I wasn't sure about the SE being allowed or not, I didn't pay much attention to that as I applied to nano and chem for my alternates. It may be helpful if you were to find out from someone who is more confident on their answer.

So basically, some universities will allow you to pick multiple alternates from one application. Queen's requires a completely different application if you wanted to be looked at for a different course.

Fortunately for me I have been given an offer for my first choices in each university.



wow, congrats for getting into your first choice! You could've made more applications tho if you wanted, correct?
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A photo of Solontus Solontus
For ECE first-year, there is a course that will teach you the basics about C# programming. No previous experience is required, however, if you get some from ICS4U, it will help tremendously. I took ICS4U, and when I was that ECE150 (the programming course), I was able to breeze through it with minimal studying and effort. The assignments will also be much easier for you if you have taken a CS course in high school, or learned something like C++ or Java on your own.
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A photo of WaterfallOfDestiny WaterfallOfDestiny
Taking ICS in high school was one of the best course decisions I made for Grade 12. No matter what field of engineering you're in, they'll make you take at least one introductory computer science course (and even more courses if you go into ECE). Better to learn and understand the logic process now, than juggle this learning along with your other engineering courses.

Just out of curiosity, are you only taking 6 courses in Grade 12? If you take more, at least you'll be able to drop 1-2 marks when universities calculate your top 6 average.

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@WaterfallOfDestiny wrote


Just out of curiosity, are you only taking 6 courses in Grade 12? If you take more, at least you'll be able to drop 1-2 marks when universities calculate your top 6 average.





Yes, I am only taking 6 courses. I was thinking that I needed a spare both semesters to work on my homework and to use it as a stress reliever. Also, I'm not sure what field I want to go into yet :/ I think I will decide over the summer. If i decide to do engineering (probably ECE) then I will drop bio and take TEJ4MI and ICS 3MI. However, if I am still unsure then I will just take TEJ4MI because in my school you learn a bit of programming in TEJ. I have TEJ3MI this semester and our teacher told us that we were going to do programming some time this semester. (building sumobots for the summative, etc)
I have a question. How much more math do you learn in university for engineering after high school? After I take AF and calc & vectors
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A photo of WaterfallOfDestiny WaterfallOfDestiny

@applesnack wrote
How much more math do you learn in university for engineering after high school? After I take AF and calc & vectors




A few courses spread out over your first two years. Depends which discipline you go into, of course, but ECE generally has among the most math. At U of T, I believe you'll take 2 calculus courses, 1 linear algebra, and another 1 for complex analysis/vector calculus.
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A photo of maattp maattp
Everything looks good except for the bio. I, like many others here, strongly encourage you to take ICS4UI. You may still be able to take it even though you didn't take the grade 11 course. At my school, Grade 11 is Visual Basic and Grade 12 is Java, so you don't necessarily have to take Grade 11 to do Grade 12.
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