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Grading Systems: Canada v. US

A photo of xXxUfacStorAxXx xXxUfacStorAxXx
So, I'm a little confused. In the US, most schools have a +/- system that works something like this:

A = >=93 = 4.0
A- = 88-93 = 3.67
B+ = 85-88 = 3.3
B = 83-85 = 3.0
B- = 78-83 = 2.7

In Canada it seems much more fair: http://careers.mcmaster.ca/students/education-planning/virtual-resources/gpa-conversion-chart

So, my question is, why does the American scale seem too unrealistic? Is it just easier over there (grading)? I'm sort of confused as to how this works because, obviously getting 95+ in high school is hard enough. How can one possibly pull off many 93+'s in university?

(I'm aware that things are curved, etc., but some classes aren't and I'm a little confused as to how this would work out).
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A photo of tigerwoods tigerwoods

@xXxUfacStorAxXx wrote
So, I'm a little confused. In the US, most schools have a +/- system that works something like this:

A = >=93 = 4.0
A- = 88-93 = 3.67
B+ = 85-88 = 3.3
B = 83-85 = 3.0
B- = 78-83 = 2.7

In Canada it seems much more fair: http://careers.mcmaster.ca/students/education-planning/virtual-resources/gpa-conversion-chart

So, my question is, why does the American scale seem too unrealistic? Is it just easier over there (grading)? I'm sort of confused as to how this works because, obviously getting 95+ in high school is hard enough. How can one possibly pull off many 93+'s in university?

(I'm aware that things are curved, etc., but some classes aren't and I'm a little confused as to how this would work out).



I know a few people who have played the holes at both courses. The general consensus is that a 93% at an average US university is on par with a 93% at an average CDN university. One "pulls off" many 93+'s by many different methods.

1. Studying
2. Cheating
3. Doing a non-science or non-engineering major
4. Taking fewer classes per term
5. Taking easy classes
6. Going to a non-competitive university (This includes any US university outside of the top 20 or any Canadian university outside of UofT.)
6. Going to a competitive school with serious grade-inflation (This includes most of the Ivy League schools, Stanford, etc.)
8. Wo.... Oh crap! Elin is here. I have to get off the computer before she finds out and smashes a 7-iron into my computer.
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A photo of jessiexo jessiexo
I think a lot of Canadian universities (namely McGill and U of T) suffer from grade deflation so my guess is that widening the span of higher GPAs makes it more achievable?
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
My university is non-competitive in nature. I'm currently sitting at a 95 average (only because I'm doing a math major - I'd be dying in English or any other arts degree).
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@tigerwoods wrote

@xXxUfacStorAxXx wrote
So, I'm a little confused. In the US, most schools have a +/- system that works something like this:

A = >=93 = 4.0
A- = 88-93 = 3.67
B+ = 85-88 = 3.3
B = 83-85 = 3.0
B- = 78-83 = 2.7

In Canada it seems much more fair: http://careers.mcmaster.ca/students/education-planning/virtual-resources/gpa-conversion-chart

So, my question is, why does the American scale seem too unrealistic? Is it just easier over there (grading)? I'm sort of confused as to how this works because, obviously getting 95+ in high school is hard enough. How can one possibly pull off many 93+'s in university?

(I'm aware that things are curved, etc., but some classes aren't and I'm a little confused as to how this would work out).



I know a few people who have played the holes at both courses. The general consensus is that a 93% at an average US university is on par with a 93% at an average CDN university. One "pulls off" many 93+'s by many different methods.

1. Studying
2. Cheating
3. Doing a non-science or non-engineering major
4. Taking fewer classes per term
5. Taking easy classes
6. Going to a non-competitive university (This includes any US university outside of the top 20 or any Canadian university outside of UofT.)
6. Going to a competitive school with serious grade-inflation (This includes most of the Ivy League schools, Stanford, etc.)
8. Wo.... Oh crap! Elin is here. I have to get off the computer before she finds out and smashes a 7-iron into my computer.



This is harsh but true.
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A photo of jessiexo jessiexo
[quote=tigerwoods]
@xXxUfacStorAxXx wrote


1. Studying
2. Cheating
3. Doing a non-science or non-engineering major
4. Taking fewer classes per term
5. Taking easy classes
6. Going to a non-competitive university (This includes any US university outside of the top 20 or any Canadian university outside of UofT.)
6. Going to a competitive school with serious grade-inflation (This includes most of the Ivy League schools, Stanford, etc.)
8. Wo.... Oh crap! Elin is here. I have to get off the computer before she finds out and smashes a 7-iron into my computer.



Well.. Pretty sure McGill deflates grades as well :P McGill > U of T :cheers:
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A photo of FiresinX FiresinX

@jessiexo wrote
I think a lot of Canadian universities (namely McGill and U of T) suffer from grade deflation so my guess is that widening the span of higher GPAs makes it more achievable?



Actually it's quite the opposite. I have alot of friends at UofT downtown and a friend at Mcgill. UofT bell curves & inflates their marks by 50% in some cases. They have no restrictions to the bellcurves they give, a friend of mine said he went from a 45% to a 90%+ (45%+ bellcurve!!)in his first bio midterm at UofT (downtown) in life sciences. He said he had multiple bellcurves throughout the year ranging from 2-50%. Mcgill also has bell curves but im not sure how much it ranges.
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A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles

@FiresinX wrote

@jessiexo wrote
I think a lot of Canadian universities (namely McGill and U of T) suffer from grade deflation so my guess is that widening the span of higher GPAs makes it more achievable?



Actually it's quite the opposite. I have alot of friends at UofT downtown and a friend at Mcgill. UofT bell curves & inflates their marks by 50% in some cases. They have no restrictions to the bellcurves they give, a friend of mine said he went from a 45% to a 90%+ (45%+ bellcurve!!)in his first bio midterm at UofT (downtown) in life sciences. He said he had multiple bellcurves throughout the year ranging from 2-50%. Mcgill also has bell curves but im not sure how much it ranges.


Wouldn't that mean the class average was like 30%...lol
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A photo of littleroom littleroom

@FiresinX wrote

@jessiexo wrote
I think a lot of Canadian universities (namely McGill and U of T) suffer from grade deflation so my guess is that widening the span of higher GPAs makes it more achievable?



Actually it's quite the opposite. I have alot of friends at UofT downtown and a friend at Mcgill. UofT bell curves & inflates their marks by 50% in some cases. They have no restrictions to the bellcurves they give, a friend of mine said he went from a 45% to a 90%+ (45%+ bellcurve!!)in his first bio midterm at UofT (downtown) in life sciences. He said he had multiple bellcurves throughout the year ranging from 2-50%. Mcgill also has bell curves but im not sure how much it ranges.


I have never heard about a ~45% inflation here in UTSG. If your friend went from a 45% to a 90% in his midterm, that would mean that the class average was around 20% (they never bell it over the class average being around 65%). This, even though our school is hard, I highly doubt. When did he take biology? In my big courses (biology, chemistry, psychology) they have bellcurved, but it's been around 5-10%, the only exception being in chemistry when they bellcurved the first midterm up ~30% because the class average was in the 30-40% range, but it certainly doesn't happen multiple times throughout the year, and certainly not 2-50%. You usually get what you deserved.
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A photo of waterlooser waterlooser
Every university grades differently, on different scales, and bell curves.
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A photo of FiresinX FiresinX

@littleroom wrote

@FiresinX wrote

@jessiexo wrote
I think a lot of Canadian universities (namely McGill and U of T) suffer from grade deflation so my guess is that widening the span of higher GPAs makes it more achievable?



Actually it's quite the opposite. I have alot of friends at UofT downtown and a friend at Mcgill. UofT bell curves & inflates their marks by 50% in some cases. They have no restrictions to the bellcurves they give, a friend of mine said he went from a 45% to a 90%+ (45%+ bellcurve!!)in his first bio midterm at UofT (downtown) in life sciences. He said he had multiple bellcurves throughout the year ranging from 2-50%. Mcgill also has bell curves but im not sure how much it ranges.


I have never heard about a ~45% inflation here in UTSG. If your friend went from a 45% to a 90% in his midterm, that would mean that the class average was around 20% (they never bell it over the class average being around 65%). This, even though our school is hard, I highly doubt. When did he take biology? In my big courses (biology, chemistry, psychology) they have bellcurved, but it's been around 5-10%, the only exception being in chemistry when they bellcurved the first midterm up ~30% because the class average was in the 30-40% range, but it certainly doesn't happen multiple times throughout the year, and certainly not 2-50%. You usually get what you deserved.



He told me the average was quite low and that's how he got a ridiculous bell curve...but i don't know the exact details, and yes it was for bio. As for multiple bell curves...you just said bio, chem and psychology. But anyways, if you get even a 30% bell curve it's insane....That's 3 full grade levels!! But yea, UTSG from what i hear has the most bell curves but it balances out somewhat for the hard tests...
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
I like empirical evidence and hearsay. They guide all my decisions in life.
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A photo of axiom2true axiom2true

@mynameismattgotmlgo wrote
I like empirical evidence and hearsay. They guide all my decisions in life.



Nice line. So do I!
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