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Hate Speech

A photo of littleroom littleroom
I've just come to realize that hate speech is outlawed (yes, I'm quite late in that realization) in many countries. Right now, although discussion may change my mind, I think any form of expression should be allowed, hateful or otherwise.

What do you guys think?
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19 replies
 
A photo of Jenkins Jenkins
no
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A photo of Balind Balind
I agree with you, though most people find it hard to ignore something they find offensive. If they could, that would be the ideal.
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A photo of Tunny Tunny
First of all lols to the guy who just said no secondly freedom of speech is something that us who live and canada and similar parts of the world have become very used to and the idea of that being barred seems really really strange. Hate speech is definitely a form of a expression because thats what it is your expressing yourself, ideas and what you feel but in the same sense that doesn't make it necessarily right. Especially when it involves verbal attacks that disparage races or groups of people. You can say it just don't broadcast it.
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A photo of Zion Zion
Freedom is an illusion.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Hate speech is usually allowed in Canada, so long as it does not cross the line in terms of being "too hateful", inciting violence, or spreading false rumours.
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A photo of blake414 blake414
Freedom is speech is all a lie anyway, the government has total control if you like it or not.

jsut look at commercialism, it controls our entire society now a days.

and hate speech will be around whether it is legal or illegal.
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A photo of littleroom littleroom
Yes, but should it be allowed? Murder will always be around too, but I don't think it should be allowed, for instance.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@blake414 wrote
Freedom is speech is all a lie anyway, the government has total control if you like it or not.



What?! You're nuts.

"Freedom of speech" is entrenched in the U.S. Constitution and it cannot be waved by any government or government official. The U.S. Constitution has been much less lenient than Canada's Charter in relation to how they allow freedom of speech, even when it is hateful, harmful, or false.

Canada's "freedom of speech" (freedom of the press, thought, and expression) is also entrenched in the constitutional document the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Again, our government can't just control those rights or get rid of them if they please - this is an enormously important document, and the government would be in serious trouble if they violated your rights.
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A photo of Qq Qq
You should admire the fact that you even live in Canada
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A photo of Ashton Ashton
Freedom is often equated to as having no boundaries, rules, or any regulations. However, without these things it's very difficult and practically impossible for freedom to exist. I propose that freedom requires these things, however, not to the extent where freedom itself is jepardized. For instance, there is the freedom to drive to our desired destination. Without the rules of the road many of us wouldn't even make it to where we'd like to go because of accidents or without the signs that guide us to our destination we'd be lost. These guides and rules make it possible to fullfil our desires.

When it comes to the freedom of speech, it does not mean that we are literally free to say/broadcast cast everything that crosses our minds. This is because some of the things that are said can be slanderous, encourage unlawful actions, and fuel hateful actions towards people because of their race, nationality, religious beliefs, gender, etc. When things like this is said people are harmed in ways that are not permissible by law, and can make it so that people do not feel free to express themselves due to fear of abuse from the general public. Without the regualtions governing what qualifies as free speech and hate speech freedom of speech could not exist or at least the concept of freedom of speech wouldn't make any sense.
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A photo of sjanesingh sjanesingh
I don't think hate speech should ever be allowed. Going out of your way to hate something/someone doesn't make anything better. I believe in freedom but I don't believe in hate. People throw the word around too much. I am not a peace keeper or anything like that, but I truly feel that people should be able to respect peoples opinions and beliefs and leave them alone. If their not bothering you, don't bother them. And if they are bothering you - kill them with kindness.
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A photo of littleroom littleroom
Who decides what is hateful, rather than just critical?
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@littleroom wrote
Who decides what is hateful, rather than just critical?


The courts and the legislature... :scratch:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hate_speech_laws_in_Canada


In Canada, advocating genocide or inciting hatred against any 'identifiable group' is an indictable offence under the Criminal Code of Canada with maximum prison terms of two to fourteen years. An 'identifiable group' is defined as 'any section of the public distinguished by colour, race, religion, ethnic origin or sexual orientation.' It makes exceptions for cases of statements of truth, and subjects of public debate and religious doctrine. The landmark judicial decision on the constitutionality of this law was R. v. Keegstra (1990)

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A photo of littleroom littleroom
^ Well, yes. What I was really asking is if they have the right to, or any objective way of doing so. Of course, saying something that unequivocally calls for the genocide of a group of people is hateful, but how about the gray areas? Some of my Muslim friends, if I as little as criticize Muhammad, call me anti-Islam. The rest of them say I shouldn't talk about such things, which is a subtle demand for censorship.

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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@littleroom wrote
^ Well, yes. What I was really asking is if they have the right to, or any objective way of doing so. Of course, saying something that unequivocally calls for the genocide of a group of people is hateful, but how about the gray areas? Some of my Muslim friends, if I as little as criticize Muhammad, call me anti-Islam. The rest of them say I shouldn't talk about such things, which is a subtle demand for censorship.




I just cited R. v. Keegstra for you - that is the objective way the courts have of determining whether hate speech should be allowed. They use the Oakes Test. In considering the proportionality of limiting someone's right to expression versus someone's right to not be hated upon,

1. There must be a pressing and substantial objective
2. The means must be proportional
2. (a) The means must be rationally connected to the objective
2. (b) There must be minimal impairment of rights
2. (c) There must be proportionality between the infringement and objective
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A photo of Idil222 Idil222

@littleroom wrote
I've just come to realize that hate speech is outlawed (yes, I'm quite late in that realization) in many countries. Right now, although discussion may change my mind, I think any form of expression should be allowed, hateful or otherwise.

What do you guys think?



From what you just said about how "any form of expression should be allowed, hateful or otherwise" I'm guessing you're not from a minority group...how do you think people from those groups feel? The law is just trying to protect those people...but yet it still exists and many people get away with it...but whether it's outlawed or not, it's still going to happen no matter what.
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A photo of Idil222 Idil222

@sjanesingh wrote
I don't think hate speech should ever be allowed. Going out of your way to hate something/someone doesn't make anything better. I believe in freedom but I don't believe in hate. People throw the word around too much. I am not a peace keeper or anything like that, but I truly feel that people should be able to respect peoples opinions and beliefs and leave them alone. If their not bothering you, don't bother them. And if they are bothering you - kill them with kindness.



I completely agree with you but people still hate on those from different races and regardless of the law there will always be horrible people like that. I hope these people will realize what they're doing is wrong.
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A photo of littleroom littleroom

@Idil222 wrote

@littleroom wrote
I've just come to realize that hate speech is outlawed (yes, I'm quite late in that realization) in many countries. Right now, although discussion may change my mind, I think any form of expression should be allowed, hateful or otherwise.

What do you guys think?



From what you just said about how "any form of expression should be allowed, hateful or otherwise" I'm guessing you're not from a minority group...how do you think people from those groups feel? The law is just trying to protect those people...but yet it still exists and many people get away with it...but whether it's outlawed or not, it's still going to happen no matter what.



Being from a minority or majority group does not preclude my ability to judge the validity of a law, or the alleged scope of rights. I said what I said because I don't think people have the right to not be offended. I find a lot of what Bill O'Reilly says to be offending, but I'm not asking the government to "protect" me from it.

I have reconsidered slightly, however. If certain forms of speech can be found to bring about violence or discrimination, as ARMY101 pointed out, then I think that's a legitimate reason for not allowing that form of speech in public. But doing so seems to me to be extremely difficult, for how can you decide whether it was the speech that made people racist, or it was people who were racist in the first place? Secondly, how do you separate being offended from being discriminated? For example, I think we should have the right to criticize religions as much as we want, but many religious people I speak to think certain things just shouldn't be said about religion.
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A photo of Rreis Rreis
It all depends on the venue, there is a time and a place for certain sentiments and there are places where it is inappropriate. Hate speech laws are interesting, in that by definition in Canada it can constitute just about damned well anything, including critism no matter how legitimate of a religious group or other minority. Now that being said I don't want to suddenly see the n word posted everywhere, but it has it's context like in Twain's Huck Finn, removing the word to pander to political corectness does a terrible dishonour to all those who fought for black rights in any decade at any time, because not acknowledging the fact that there was ever racism is dangerous because history oft tends to repeat itself if we are ignorant of it.
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