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A photo of Annabubble2011 Annabubble2011
Hi,

I was wondering, for uoft do you have to satisfy all the breadth requirements in your first year?

Thanks :bounce:
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Breadth requirements are usually like degree requirements, they must be completed to graduate.

It's unlikely they will have you complete all of them your first year, at least I haven't seen it that way before.

Wherever the requirements are listed on the website should clarify though.
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
Not at all, but most people try to get them done in first year, and if not by first year, then by second. Trust me, you don't want to be the guy or girl who is excited about convocation, only to discover, at the very last minute, that you're missing a breadth requirement, so you can't graduate... (This actually happened to someone I know.)
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A photo of Annabubble2011 Annabubble2011
Thanks for helping guys! I was also wondering about two other questions. First of all, what is the recommended course load/credits for first year students? Would it be better to do lesser in first year, more on second year or evenly distribute it? Also, would any recommend full year seminar or half year? Please provide with reasons please!

Thank you!:cheers:
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
A regular course load is 5.0 credits. It's really up to you whether you want to do, say, 4.0 during the fall/winter term and then 1.0 for the spring/summer term. I didn't find a regular course load that hard to manage, even with part-time work. What I can tell you is that it's probably easier to find work and gain work experience if you leave your summers free (which will be very important if you want to be marketable in the future).

I would pick two half-year seminars. More variety, more to learn. Also, if you mess up in one, it won't affect your GPA as much as a full-year course would (half-courses are generally more GPA-forgiving than full-year ones). But if there's a full-year seminar that you're really interested in taking, by all means, do take it.
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