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HIGH SCHOOL TO UNIVERSITY TRANSITION

A photo of Sweet99 Sweet99
Hey, I am going to Queen's for science. This will be my first year at university. How big of a jump is it from high school science to first year university science? If I am a 90-91% student, what will be my grades in first year? Do you have any tips on how to suceed in my first year and make a succesfull transition?

Thanks in advance
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo
http://www.studentawards.com/Forum.aspx?g=posts&t=5165
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A photo of lsylva lsylva
Focus and try to do all your reading ahead of time. Its very easy to fall back.. The main tip that I can give anyone is to have self discipline! Your friends are gonna wanna party and such , just monitor your time wisely and you can party over the break!
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A photo of emotycka emotycka
There are tons of threads on this already. Take a perusal of them :). Marks in University are not dependent AT ALL on marks in high school. In University it is all about effort and self discipline. Put in the time and you will do well.

I know it sounds obvious, but it is rarely actually done. DO YOUR READINGS BEFORE GOING TO CLASS!!!!! So important. Even if you don't have time to do an in depth reading, do a quick scan of the headings and bolded words. It will help you focus during lecture and give you a general idea of what you're going to learn.

Again, seems obvious, but apparently not. GO TO CLASS AND TAKE NOTES. And by take notes I don't mean update facebook or post on student awards. i mean actually listen to what the prof is saying and write it down.

You should be doing 2-3 hours of out of class work for every hour of lecture. A this point many university students are rolling there eyes at me and saying as if. Just think of how much better you would have done if you'd actually listened when people told you this.

You can have a life, you just need to learn how to balance it with the demands of school. University is harder than high school, way harder. With a little effort, you can succeed. just put in the time and actually care about doing the assigned reading and reviewing notes. While you may have been able to get away with cramming and not studying in high school, that just isn't the case in University, there's way to much material. In most classes, you do a Unit or two a week. That's right, a week. It takes work, but it is possible to do well.

There are some people who can still do well with minimal work, but for the rest of us, university is the time to pull up our big girl panties and pull out the books.
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A photo of mynameismattgotmlgo mynameismattgotmlgo

@emotycka wrote
A this point many university students are rolling there eyes at me and saying as if. Just think of how much better you would have done if you'd actually listened when people told you this.



I'd recommend that any high school student or any struggling university student follow your advice. What you said should work for just about anyone, but it's not necessarily the most efficient way of going about learning for everyone. I do well enough by going to class whenever I feel like it, mostly doing crosswords and chatting with friends when I do go to class, NEVER printing off the lecture notes (and never taking notes), never looking at the discussion board on WebCT, not even purchasing the textbook, but I do spend quite a bit of time studying. I'm not a slacker per se; I'm just very efficient. I just know what works (not necessarily "for me"; if any of my classmates did what I did, it would work for them too).

Idiots who like to think they're smart but who are not very articulate will tell you that they can do very little work yet still do well because they're smart or because they're a genius. Neither are necessarily the case. How I'm able to do well yet seem like a slacker is by having a genuine desire to do as little work as possible, so I'm always asking "is this really necessary?" and when I feel like something is unnecessary for academic success, then I put my theory to the test. That's when having some balls (i.e. having a genuine desire to do as little as possible) comes into play. For example, I started by reading the textbook before class - I wanted to do well, so I figured I should do this. After a few midterms, I realized that the textbook material was only rarely, if ever, tested. So I took a risk (one that seemed reasonable from my experience) and stopped reading the textbook. With few exceptions, usually obvious ones (e.g. when the prof would say it is absolutely important that you read the textbook and when I saw on ratemyprofessors.com that the prof liked asking questions from the textbook), I would never read the textbook. I've never had any regrets about not reading the textbook.
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A photo of jessicadonnan jessicadonnan
see ya at Queens :)
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