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How did you decide what program you are doing in university

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Heyy people, I am a going-to-gr12 public hs kid wondering what to do in life.

A brief info about myslf:
1. Live in GTA
2. Like interior designs, fascinated by tech, love to eat, outgoing, enjoy flying and driving
3. my favourite YouTube video is "A Day Made of Glass"
4. i studied because of others, not for myself (aka I got good grades but I didnt enjoy them)
5. my ultimate goal is to retire asap (at 45) [I know it may not be feasible, but still...)

Here's my gr11 grades
English 83
Functions 99
Accounting  94
Marketing  96
Chemistry 86
Physics 82
Biology 90
Broadcasting 87

And my only grade 12 grade is physics (completed in summer school) - 94

As above, how did you decide what you are going to do in the future??? Like how do you figure out what you want??
I like interior designs, tech, food, sports, but the thing is - i can't see myself in the future
I dont know what to do? Despite trying to get good grades and apply every single university in ontario....
I really need some advice. Please give me some advice :) :) :)

Thank you very much
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UPDATE:
Courses taking in gr 12 (no spare):  
- English
- Chemistry
- Biology
- Adv. Functions
- Cal and vectors
- Data management
- Accounting
- International Business
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I decided I wanted to go to law school based on interests, prestige, money, career stability, etc. I'm good at English and arts related subjects, as well as public speaking and working with people- so law was an ideal career. 

I chose my undergrad school based on where I believed I could get the highest GPA, major based on the same criteria but also interest towards the subject played a role, and where I could save a lot of money (school close to home). Needless to say everything worked out for me and I got into a bunch of law schools in Ontario. 

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Where did you go for undergrad may I ask? And what was your average in Gr 12? To get into law school, you must have high GPA, right? What was you GPA? And how did you get high GPA? I am not interested in law school particularly but I would like to know the general idea of attending grad school. Thank you :)))
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You're best off going into business it looks, or perhaps health/medical/kin. Wouldn't recommend engineering if you're not super strong at physics
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IMO, a 94 is a pretty strong mark for physics
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Too bad OP got 82.
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In grade 11, right below it he says he did grade 12 physics already and got a 94
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My bad. Didn't see that.
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Some Unis don't take summer school marks very seriously. They prefer you take the subject during the year, but it really depends on the school. I know McMaster doesn't look at whether or not it was a summer school grade.
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Well, there are really 2 separate questions here:

1) What do you want to study in university? 
2) What do you want to do for a living? 

In many cases, the two are basically the same question, but not always. Personally, I couldn't figure out what I wanted to do for a living. In fact, I could see myself changing careers a few times in the future. However, I did have some broad ideas as to the fields that seemed interesting to me (even if they were all very different). 

So, what I did was this: I looked up a bunch of different university majors and then widdled down the list to only include things that 1) I genuinely enjoyed and would do well at and 2) That could get me into at least one of the career fields that I wanted. 

I then made a sort of strategic decision. I basically picked the major that would give me access to the highest number of my desired career fields. Basically, I picked the degree that would close the least number of doors (and that I also really enjoyed at the same time). 

After picking the major, I did a bit more research looking for the school that would be the best fit for me as a person and for my career goals. 
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So where did you go for? And what was your desired career fields?? Also, how did you conduct your research? Did you go for open house? Or OUF? Or just internet? Because I went to some universities' open house and I felt they were super bias about their school and students. Then I went to OUF but it was too crowded that I couldn't even get a chance to talk with the people. And for internet,.... I don't know what to say about it....
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Here's a tip based on my own experience: University fairs are absolutely useless. They're propaganda and absolutely nothing else. You can go for the free stuff, but it's one of the dumbest events imaginable (and such a waste of paper - all of the info in those books they hand out is available online).

University websites are also not very useful (although, they're better than fairs). They're basically full of dishonest advertisements of programs. Every school apparently has the "top program in X". Everyone's coop programs are apparently amazing and get people internships at huge companies. There may be some truth to these claims, but the schools usually use cherry picked examples (or they're intentionally misleading). 

So…that leaves us in a tricky place, eh? Honestly, the best resource is the internet - now, there's A LOT of BS on the internet (much of it on this very forum) but it can be good if you pick your sources right. 

The field I decided to go into was engineering. The specific discipline of engineering isn't very important because you can switch later on. I chose engineering because it played to my skills and what I was passionate about (love math, physics, analysis, etc.). Another crucial reason was that engineering was going to provide me with a certain set of skills that are desirable in the markets that I have some interest in. Some of the fields I had at least some interest in were: design (involving technology), data (analysis), academia (basic/applied research at some level), finance, teaching math/physics, medicine, law, among some other fields. As you can tell, I had a very scattered brain (and I still do)! Engineering didn't close any of these doors (whereas some other programs would). More than that, I felt that engineering might actually improve my chances of either getting into all of these fields or at least doing well in these fields once I was in (one exception might be medicine). 

So, the next question might be: how did I come to decide that engineering would actually give me a good shot in all of these industries? What I did was take to the internet and look for data. I'd ask questions like: are there engineers in finance? If you can find cold, hard numbers and trends, then that's perfect! Even if you can't, you're going to come across anecdotes. You'd be surprised at what kinds of people you can meet online. I've talked to people online who recruit at finance firms and that was a great way to gain some insight. You have to have some trust in the internet to do this though. I think, in general, you can tell if someone is lying or if they're saying something reasonable. The best thing to do is to ask people who have no vested interest in your decisions. Schools want you to pick certain programs. 

I also talked to people in the industry by contacting them on reddit (through private messages). I went to the engineering sub (and you can do this for any field) and I just picked people who have experience in X fields and I'd just ask about their work and how their peers are doing. You can get a sense for the breadth that the program provides by seeing people in such diverse industries. 

This is also a chance to exercise some critical thinking. You have to ask yourself: is what I'm hearing logical. For example, if you were a premed and someone told you to do your undergrad at a prestigious school, you have to question the base assumptions of such an insertion. Why would med schools care about prestige? Is it important to the practice of medicine? You have to question everything (to a reasonable extent). 

Now, there is some compromise that I had to make in choosing engineering. For example, my dream job is actually to work for a big league sports team (like the Jays or Leafs) and do statistical analysis for them (ala Moneyball, if you've ever seen it). The absolute best degree for this probably would have been stats+computer science. So, why didn't I choose that? Well, I have other "dream jobs" and engineering increased my chances at getting those, even if it decreased my chances in this one (even then, you can pick up the necessary skills through engineering).

(And to answer your first question, I ended up at Uoft for electrical engineering). 
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Wow that's really help me thank you!  I have never thought of this "So, the next question might be: how did I come to decide that engineering would actually give me a good shot in all of these industries? What I did was take to the internet and look for data. I'd ask questions like: are there engineers in finance? If you can find cold, hard numbers and trends, then that's perfect! Even if you can't, you're going to come across anecdotes. You'd be surprised at what kinds of people you can meet online." before!! Thank you so much, you gave me another perspective when doing the research!! I really appreciate it, thank you :))
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look at the current market and base your decision not only your interests but also on what you think will provide you with a comfortable life... At the end of the day youre going to school not because you think Picasso's art is incredible, but to get a job that will sustain you for the rest of your life.
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This is debatable. You don't just get to decide the purpose of higher education. Not everyone will agree with you.
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So what was your major and what were your interests? Was there any obstacle when you were trying to balance out the sustainability and interest? How did you over come it?
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Marketing would be pretty good. That means business. But youwontbe able to retire at that age.
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Do you think marketing is saturated? I don't know. I have heard people saying that the entire business sector is full because everyone is getting a business degree... Is that true??
Also, another question (maybe a little bit ignorance, I apologize in advance) why you said "you won't be able to retire at that age (45)?" Is marketing tough??? 
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Yes, everyone is getting a business degree and marketing itself is a bird program and pays the lowest out of all the business fields. Not sure why you're even considering this with such a high average. You know what marketing is right? Don't even need a degree to go into it.
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I started by ruling out anything I wasn't passionate about or couldn't see myself doing, so anything in the sciences. I couldn't decide between arts and business so I just kept my options open by going to Western with AEO so I can actually make decisions of what I want to do when I'm exposed to subject matter in a real world context. I might like x in highschool but that doesn't mean I'll like it in uni or in the job market so I didn't want to choose based off the little exposure I had.
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I started off by going to the university fair and getting one of the view books from every single university, I had no idea what i wanted to do so i didn't talk to anyone at the school booths. I eventually started looking through books and highlighting any programs that seemed interesting which was helpful. I looked up different ranking of universities in Canada and I realized I wanted to go to a "good" school for some bragging rights which helped narrow down my choices. If you haven't 100% decided on a program by the oak application date then apply to a few different programs (i know people who applied in may when the app date was January so don't stress too much). I researched & visited the campus, and decided if i want to stay home or not. If money is not a problem then GO AWAY TO SCHOOL, but if you commute to school you will literally save so much money ($10,000 to live in a shoe box and share a bathroom with an entire floor). You're taking all the prereqs you could possibly ever need & you have great marks that you will likely get in to any programs (possibly with scholarships $$$). Look in to Westerns Ivey HBA program, its gives you the opportunity to a business degree while exploring other programs for your first two years. Im going to western for media studies this year and staying on-campus.
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This is completely unrelated to your question but Are you some kind of genius?? A 99 in functions??? Lol at my school majority of the grade failed or got 60 and below only a very small percent got 70 and above and only one girl I know got a 97
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I cannot say I am a genius tbh, because I worked really hard for that, people know me can prove it. I did all the homework assigned by the teacher, nonetheless I had tutor classes every week to back me up.
Also, I think I am considered one of the "annoying" kids because I asked tons of questions in order to clear things up. My routine for math is pay attention in  class, ask questions, do homework :)
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How different is it from grade 10 math?
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For me, Gr 11 math and Gr 10 math is closely related to each other. If your foundation is good, you will be fine in Gr 11:))
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you do learn a lot of new things though in grade 11. In grade 10 you mostly focus on quadratic a but in grade 11 you branch out and each unit involves a different function
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its difficult to over come the fact that im studying something that doesnt interest me (electrical engineering). This is why i may be switching into mechanical engineering, you live and learn. 

When i was initially entering post secondary schooling i thought that the studies i was going into were definitely going to interest me, it turned out the complete opposite of that. However, it didnt all go to waste. I got a pretty interesting summer job out of it and learned a thing or two about engineering in general. 

What I was saying is you want to do as much research as possible and not end up with some sort of degree that will make it very difficult to find a job or earn a decent pay cheque. The harder the education is, the easier it is to find a job and make a living. 

maybe im wrong but thats just my 2 cents
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Andrew?
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It seems as if you are creative and like to design, have you considered architecture? Most work on computers thats the tech aspect, you can own ur own firm that covers the business aspect, idk if you are a great drawer but consider it!!!!!!!!!! Civil engineering is better if you are not a great drawer, but still like designing. Hope this helps.
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umm... I have never thought about architecture because I don't know what to do with the portfolio. I have never taken any architecture related courses so I don't think I have the ability to hand in the supp :((
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99 IN FUNCTIONS WAH

Great job! I would seriously kill for that ); jk, but I'm not exceptionally strong in math. I'm good at it, but it takes a bit longer for me to understand, and I'm not an Engineering/computer science-like math genius either, so I decided to go into health/medicine. I tried super hard in school to get an A in math. funnily enough I never manage to get As no matter how hard I try :P i even had tutors and everything, but always got B's/C+'s 


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Dear Myself-15-years-ago,
I asked myself these same questions and I've only now figured it out:
Step 1: Heads - Find a topic that makes your heart giddy when you talk about it.
Step 2: Tails - Find an injustice that makes your blood boil when you think about it.
Step 3: Flip a coin and pursue that.
Ten years after graduating from undergrad, I'm going back to do my Masters next week. In case you were wondering, I flipped Tails. :)
Good luck!
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How did you find what interested you? I have general interests but not specific enough to choose a program
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To be very honest, it sounds like you are looking for the easy way....to live life. The fact that you stated you'd like to retire by 45 shows that you're not looking to contribute but hoping to cash out quickly. But I get it. Most of us think that way in high school, especially in this day and age. Instead of thinking about what you can get out of your accomplishments thus far (ie. your high grades, which, let me tell you, mean NOTHING when you enter university as I was also an A-student from the GTA), think about how you can use your skills to advance this world in a better way. So you like technology. Do you like the idea of coding software that will make work, education, health, etc., easier? So you like design. Are you great at art? Are you creative? Can you see yourself building a product with a clever design that will make life easier for whoever is using it? So you're outgoing? Can you confidently share your beliefs and ideas with people in a way that is captivating? I don't mean to be offensive. I am giving you advice I wish I heard when I was in your shoes. Think about the questions I posed above. What topic do you find yourself always talking about with your friends? What topic do you find yourself always reading about in your spare time? (If it's just celebrity sh*t, then stop that immediately! LOL) Think about what you're good at, what you enjoy and how you can use that to make something to help others. You don't have to change the world. Even if you loved design and built a new backpack for high school students, that's something that helps. Keep asking questions and learning more about your interests. It will lead you to a purpose and that will lead to a job. Every day I find out about new jobs that I didn't know existed! You can do anything. You don't need to be a doctor, lawyer, investor, etc. Although there is nothing wrong with that if you want. Keep your options open and take various courses in first year. Let your questions, curiosities and interests lead you and they'll help you pick your courses for 2nd year etc. Here is my story: I studied sciences in high school. I double majored in biology and neuroscience in undergrad. I took a lot of psych classes due to my neuroscience major. I loved sciences but I never wanted to be a doctor or work in a hospital, etc. I knew that I loved working with and studying about children, especially after my child psych class in undergrad. After I graduated, I was still lost, so I taught children for 7 years overseas. I came back to Canada to pursue the only thing I ever really cared about: child development. That took almost ten years. I wish I followed my instincts earlier, but I don't regret anything! Life is not a straight line! That's boring! Oh, and I studied sciences in high school because my Asian parents wanted me to be a doctor. Forget what others want or say. Listen to yourself. And know that you are always changing and that's ok, but pay attention to where your mind goes when nobody is watching. Find something good in that. Good luck. You'll be fine. :)
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"To be very honest, it sounds like you are looking for the easy way....to live life. The fact that you stated you'd like to retire by 45 shows that you're not looking to contribute but hoping to cash out quickly."

I don't know if this is fair to say. Retiring early is certainly a different outlook on life, but I don't think it's inherently selfish. Why spend your waking hours slaving away for some mega corporation. I guess it depends on what your job is, but you might be able to help the world more by retiring and then volunteering. IMO, the best ways to help the world would be to either find a job that does that, or find free time to do it. 
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My only advice is to "never ask for advice from strangers." We do not know you and the majority of people are only here to judge you. My recommendation is to not look at the program name but look at courses, get one of those large catalogues of courses or browse online. Look at the courses and which ones interest you, in your first two years of university most of the classes are the same and you still can transfer and switch programs. 

Focus on the school and courses... the program will come later. You don't know what you want to do yet, university will change all that. :)
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I once saw this video. A man who was very successful in his field (IT) said the following.
You must do what fits best in 3 criterias. 1st, find something that you won't mind doing for the rest of your life and be happy at it. 2) Find something that at least pays decently. If I would have only done what I'm happy with, I'd be at home playing Call of Duty all day.
and 3rd, not a necessity, but find something you're so good at it almost feels like you're cheating.
Rob Dahm btw
Goodluck.
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You should go into Computer Science or another STEM field! There are so many possibilities for working with design within the CS and general tech fields-- you could design a website or application or build software. If all goes well and you continue developing applications people know, love, and use, then you would definitely be in line for an early retirement. I'm doing CS (computer science and cognitive science) right now because I have always been fascinated by the intersection of humans, the brain and technology and the courses I took in high school gave me early exposure to that interest. So far, so good. Do what your gut tells you, but if you don't know WHAT it's telling, you apply to a faculty and then switch from there. It's relatively easy to switch in your first years because first year is just a general studies year at most universities. :)
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Just a thought.. Check out the Automotive Business School of Canada (in Barrie). The auto industry can be incredibly lucrative and always changing!
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try looking into contracting it will apply the tech and interior design aspects. there is also opportunities to travel and make a decent amount of money. there is  a show called a "bryke at a time" try looking into that as well. but with your marks you could also look into being a doctor, surgeon, researcher or something that makes more money.
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Seems like you're a smart kid. You really just gotta do what makes you happy. Fight for what you can do for the rest of your days with a smile on your face.
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you seem smart, judging by your grades I would say BioMed Eng as an undergrad then get a masters, or you should go to dental school and then go into orthodontics (tons of money)
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so much competition these days.
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Uni Fair just made me realize
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ohhhh ur so smart
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become a doctor fham and u will make bare money
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Wrong. It takes 15+ years to become a doctor. You will be in 200k+ debt. By the time you start making a steady salary you'll be in your mid to late 30s.

If you want to make money go into dentistry, law, nursing, investment banking, private equity, trades, etc.
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You do realize if OP goes to the states he'll make 200k+ a year when he's done residency? That's more than a "steady" income if you ask me.
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You'll only start making that money after 10-15 years of very hard work, little pay and lots of debt. It's not the ideal route if your goal is to make money. There are faster routes like investment banking, consulting, lawyer, dentist, etc. You don't become a doctor for the money.
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