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How important is the reputation of the University?

A photo of zhuangx2 zhuangx2
I've read that the engineering program is more or less consistent all over Canada.

I'm considering Dalhousie right now for Engineering. If I get my degree there and look for jobs, will I have a disadvantage over someone with an engineering degree from, say UBC?

Furthermore, can any comment on how sought after Forestry engineers, Agricultural engineers and Petroleum (processing?) engineers are? I'm I was planning to get into these fields of engineering, is it better to attend some obscure university in Canada for these programs specifically or to get a degree from a more reputable university in a different, but related, program? Say, industrial or processes.
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A photo of zhuangx2 zhuangx2
...is my question that stupid?
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred
Your question isn't stupid - it's just more likely that nobody knows the answer to your question.

The prestige thing only matters in the USA.
In Canada, an engineering degree, that's an UNDERGRAD degree no less, holds the same weight as any other.
Nobody cares where you got your engineering education from, because it's the exact same as every other university.

I have never heard of forestry engineering (unless this is a fancy term for lumberjack).
I have never heard of agricultural engineering (unless this is a fancy term for farmer).
Petroleum engineers are apparently the highest paid engineers currently - higher average salaries than both chemical and aerospace engineers.

Attend the university which appeals to you. Go for whatever reason you want - scholarships, student body, professors, proximity, price, whatever. They're all the same and they all teach you the same thing.
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A photo of WaterfallOfDestiny WaterfallOfDestiny
The CEAB accreditation process for engineering programs in Canada means that the curricula, regardless of university, "should" be relatively similar. That being said, because some universities are more competitive to get into (e.g. Waterloo vs. York), some employers might have initial biases about where you got your education. Dalhousie is fairly well-known across Canada, so I wouldn't worry about it.

Petroleum engineering isn't offered at most schools, so a lot of people go through the Chemical Engineering route - it's a little more general, and I presume you can pick your courses in your last two years to focus on petroleum processing anyway. Forestry and agricultural also sound very similar to Chemical (but from a more biological perspective, so you'd need some biology courses; apparently Dalhousie has Biological and Environmental Engineering programs too).

The advantage of going through more "generalized" programs like Chem Eng is that your options are open for any of the 3 fields you named. If you wanted to specialize later on, you could pursue graduate studies. If, on the other hand, you already have your mind set on one of the fields, a specialized program might fit your interests best and you'd be able to indulge in your passions from the get-go.
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A photo of threepointonefour threepointonefour
Quick note on petroleum engineering- if you decide that is what you want to do, U of Alberta or U of Calgary are probably your best choices. Both offer Chemical Engineering or Oil and Gas/ Petroleum engineering, and oil and gas companies are always hiring from both schools. I worked with a large energy company after first year in the field, and I have already had an interview for an office job for this summer. Both these schools have really good scholarship programs, and while it's not all about the money, petroleum engineers make the most of any new grads...
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A photo of rightsaidfred rightsaidfred

Both these schools have really good scholarship programs, and while it's not all about the money, petroleum engineers make the most of any new grads...



This is true. Petroleum engineers are the highest paid engineers, currently.
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A photo of ktel ktel
I've never heard of agricultural or forestry engineering either. I don't think it exists, but you could study agriculture or forestry.

As long as you're in an accredited engineering program, it shouldn't matter where you go.

I second threepointonefour's suggestion to look at the U of A or U of C.
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