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Humber or Ryerson for Nursing?? Help!

A photo of leah93 leah93
I have posted this on another thread, but I thought it might reach some new eyes.
I have been accepted to both and I'm really confused on which one to choose! Any suggestions would be really helpful :cheers:
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A photo of cosstickxx cosstickxx
I usually try and give advice about things to people, but i don't really know anything about either. Sorry!
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A photo of Gecko Gecko
I looked into the humber program last year, and unless something has changed, I believe its a Bachelor in Nursing, not a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, there is a difference. I would choose the one with the science background, I know someone that did the degree program at humber and had to go back to school in order to get the science credits needed b/c he wanted to do his masters. So I would look into each curriculum very carefully. you can check out ryerson's by going to nursingdegree.ca and then click on curriculum. If its not a science degree, I woulden't do it. just my .02 though
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A photo of Chucklez Chucklez
Gecko, that seems to be incorrect. To get your masters in nursing (MN) you must get a bachelor's degree in nursing that must be approved by CASN. Humber/UNB's program is accredited by CASN so it's fine. There a lot of reasons why your friend couldn't get in, and I want to point out that you must have a B avg throughout the four years and B+ avg on your last two years worth of courses to be eligible for a spot. If you look at the last two years of nursing, it can be very rigorous. However, I will check up on Ryerson's and UofT's MN program to see if there are any issues with UNB's BN program.

To go even further, med schools will accept any degree. You just have to do VERY well in their requirements...and luck!

I even checked HR in hospitals since I've been seeing a lot of BSCN requirements, but they said BN=bscn as well. Although, I don't really think it matters anymore since RN students in Toronto will have to move down south to get a job (ARGH!)

In terms of arts (bn) vs. science (bscn), google it and there are a lot of arguments about it. In my perspective though, after doing the first year theory, I can see why nursing can be considered as an arts degree.

I would still prefer Ryerson's program for prestige and convenience. But then knowing Ryerson's administration, facilities, and social opportunities...eh...

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A photo of Gecko Gecko
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.
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A photo of leah93 leah93

@Gecko wrote
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.



Just want to thank both of you for replying :)

Since you're at Ryerson right now for Nursing...what do you think of the program overall?? I have heard a lot of good things about Humber, but I haven't heard much about Ryerson. I'm just worried it's going to be too science based for me since it is a bscn. And I've read some stuff in the paper about Ryerson...I know you can't really base an opinion on that but it would be good to get the perspective from a student. Oh and random question but do you do a lot of stuff that is like Grade 12 or 11 Chemistry?? I hate that stuff :P Thanks!
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A photo of Gecko Gecko

Just want to thank both of you for replying :)

Since you're at Ryerson right now for Nursing...what do you think of the program overall?? I have heard a lot of good things about Humber, but I haven't heard much about Ryerson. I'm just worried it's going to be too science based for me since it is a bscn. And I've read some stuff in the paper about Ryerson...I know you can't really base an opinion on that but it would be good to get the perspective from a student. Oh and random question but do you do a lot of stuff that is like Grade 12 or 11 Chemistry?? I hate that stuff :P Thanks![/quote]


The program itself is great, I have no issues with the program or the faculty. You shouldent be worried about the science, if you are interested in getting into the medical field, like it or not, there is a lot of information that is science based. The art side of nursing would be the whole "nurse-patient" relationship aspect.

Just curious, what have you read about Ryerson in the paper? Although Ryerson may not be known for other programs, within the Nursing field, I dont think anyone has issues with Ryerson graduates ( in term of being prepped for work). There really isnt much of a "campus life" at ryerson, but from what hear about the humber program, its about the same, mostly a commuter school. Most Universities within the city are commuter schools. We haven't touched chemistry. Maybe a little in A&P, but, its not that in depth at all.
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A photo of leah93 leah93
The only part about the science based program that worried me was that it was going to be a lot of grade 11 and grade 12 chemistry and since you said you haven't touched it, now I'm not worried about the science part :)
In the paper a couple days ago, there was something written about a third year nursing student at Ryerson who said how a lot of the professors can't teach. They only get hired because of who they are and not for their teaching abilities. It wasn't just Ryerson, it mentioned other schools too. But you get that with all schools.
I'm not too worried about a campus life because other than classes I won't be there much seeing as I'm going to be living at home ;)
But I'm going to go on the discover Ryerson day during the march break, and hopefully I can finally come to a decision :)
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A photo of cjalsev cjalsev

@Gecko wrote
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.



Just curious about this facilities thing...I am currently trying to decide between the george brown for the first two years or ryerson for the four years. Which would you say has the best facilities for the nursing program? Doesn ryerson also have the simulation lab that george brown has?
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A photo of Gecko Gecko

@cjalsev wrote

@Gecko wrote
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.



Just curious about this facilities thing...I am currently trying to decide between the george brown for the first two years or ryerson for the four years. Which would you say has the best facilities for the nursing program? Doesn ryerson also have the simulation lab that george brown has?




I cant decide for George Brown, I have never been there, I have heard that they have a good simulation lab though. I dont want to say anything that will push you in either direction. For Ryerson, we have about 15 beds I would say, with about a 20 student class, so you have plenty of chances to get around a bed. First semester isnt anything fun anyway, its all about transferring clients, making beds, asepsis and stuff like that. So, its nothing spectacular anyway. Then from then on, you are pretty much in the field at clinical, so you dont get that much time in the lab anyway.
From what I "hear" and I say "hear" as it may be a rumour cause I have never been t george brown, their lab may be a little better. But i dont want to influence your choice. Honestly, the lab isnt that big of a deal. But thats what I think, other students may have a different opinion.
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A photo of kriskriskris9 kriskriskris9

@Gecko wrote
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.






As a graduate of Humber/University of New Brunswick's Nursing degree program, I can tell you there is no advantage of choosing Ryerson because you want to do your clinical placement or work at a downtown hospital (unless you live downtown, obviously) Like every other school that does nursing, Humber has ties and agreements with hospitals in the GTA and downtown. I have done clinical placements at Toronto General Hosiptal and St. Michael's downtown and work at Toronto General now. I also know of fellow graduates from my class at Humber that work at some of the downtown hospitals like Toronto General, St.Mikes, And St. Josephs HC. My point is don't think because Ryerson is downtown that you will have a better chance of doing your placement at one of the big downtown hospitals, you can easily get that by going to any of the other schools (Its nursing for gods sake!)

: )

It all depends what you really want
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A photo of happygleek happygleek

@kriskriskris9 wrote

@Gecko wrote
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.






As a graduate of Humber/University of New Brunswick's Nursing degree program, I can tell you there is no advantage of choosing Ryerson because you want to do your clinical placement or work at a downtown hospital (unless you live downtown, obviously) Like every other school that does nursing, Humber has ties and agreements with hospitals in the GTA and downtown. I have done clinical placements at Toronto General Hosiptal and St. Michael's downtown and work at Toronto General now. I also know of fellow graduates from my class at Humber that work at some of the downtown hospitals like Toronto General, St.Mikes, And St. Josephs HC. My point is don't think because Ryerson is downtown that you will have a better chance of doing your placement at one of the big downtown hospitals, you can easily get that by going to any of the other schools (Its nursing for gods sake!)

: )

It all depends what you really want



Did you have any trouble finding a job with a BN after you graduated? I read somewhere that some employers prefer someone with a BScN, as opposed to BN, I'm just not sure how valid that information was! Also, how did you find the work load at Humber? A lot of people say that at Ryerson it is pretty challenging especially throughout the first year (7 courses!). It's only 5 at Humber, right? Thanks in advance!
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A photo of kriskriskris9 kriskriskris9

@happygleek wrote

@kriskriskris9 wrote

@Gecko wrote
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.






As a graduate of Humber/University of New Brunswick's Nursing degree program, I can tell you there is no advantage of choosing Ryerson because you want to do your clinical placement or work at a downtown hospital (unless you live downtown, obviously) Like every other school that does nursing, Humber has ties and agreements with hospitals in the GTA and downtown. I have done clinical placements at Toronto General Hosiptal and St. Michael's downtown and work at Toronto General now. I also know of fellow graduates from my class at Humber that work at some of the downtown hospitals like Toronto General, St.Mikes, And St. Josephs HC. My point is don't think because Ryerson is downtown that you will have a better chance of doing your placement at one of the big downtown hospitals, you can easily get that by going to any of the other schools (Its nursing for gods sake!)

: )

It all depends what you really want



Did you have any trouble finding a job with a BN after you graduated? I read somewhere that some employers prefer someone with a BScN, as opposed to BN, I'm just not sure how valid that information was! Also, how did you find the work load at Humber? A lot of people say that at Ryerson it is pretty challenging especially throughout the first year (7 courses!). It's only 5 at Humber, right? Thanks in advance!




No I did not have trouble finding a job with my BN, I was offered a job from where I did my placement right away after graduation. From my knowledge many of my fellow graduates found jobs as well. Something I did not mention was that I graduated 2007, before the economy went sour, because at that time hospitals did not have hiring freezes (so they don't have to layoff existing nurses) and tight budgets (costly to hire and train new grads)like right now. The job market for new grads is almost non-existent right now. I know of family and friends who have graduated from Ryerson and Humber 2009-2010 who are jobless and still looking to this day. So regardless of what school you choose to go to, I think you might have a hard time finding work, but that could change 4-5 years from now, I don't know.

For the part where employers prefer a Bachelor of Science in Nursing vs a Bachelor of Nursing...umm I see no difference as I work with people with both at Toronto General (which is under University Health Network). I'm sure what you mean is when a job posting lists BScN as one of the qualifications. They really are the same degrees just different wording. I think when an employer sees an applicant with a BN applying to a posting that only mentions BScN they would make exceptions and recognize the BN.

Now about the workload, its not an easy program, I also worked part-time on weekends so for me it was pretty challenging. Of course there were those who failed which sucks because if you fail one subject you fail the entire year and have to redo it, but its like that at Ryerson and York too. I think as long as you work hard, you will be fine.

For the extra courses at Ryerson in first year, I can't comment on that, but I will tell you there are always going to be some useless courses that you will be required to take (example=electives) no matter what school you choose to go to.

Now with that all said, what do you want? because thats what it all really comes down to since you will be spending 4 years of your life studying at a school. Do you want to go to school downtown Toronto? Do you want to be surrounded by other university students or college students? Are you going to be living downtown? taking the bus? driving? Are you commuting, if so from where? etc. etc. One of the reasons I chose Humber nursing is because it was a 15 minute drive from my house.

BTW the passing rate for the CRNE exam (exam you must write after you obtain your degree to get your nursing license) is higher from Humber graduates than Ryerson graduates. My cousin that went to Ryerson for Nursing told me that one of her professors said that the passing rate for Rye students for 2009 was about 40%, of course she passed hers but some of her peers did not... I don't know just that that was interesting.

Hope this helps
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A photo of leah93 leah93

@kriskriskris9 wrote

@happygleek wrote

@kriskriskris9 wrote

@Gecko wrote
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.






As a graduate of Humber/University of New Brunswick's Nursing degree program, I can tell you there is no advantage of choosing Ryerson because you want to do your clinical placement or work at a downtown hospital (unless you live downtown, obviously) Like every other school that does nursing, Humber has ties and agreements with hospitals in the GTA and downtown. I have done clinical placements at Toronto General Hosiptal and St. Michael's downtown and work at Toronto General now. I also know of fellow graduates from my class at Humber that work at some of the downtown hospitals like Toronto General, St.Mikes, And St. Josephs HC. My point is don't think because Ryerson is downtown that you will have a better chance of doing your placement at one of the big downtown hospitals, you can easily get that by going to any of the other schools (Its nursing for gods sake!)

: )

It all depends what you really want



Did you have any trouble finding a job with a BN after you graduated? I read somewhere that some employers prefer someone with a BScN, as opposed to BN, I'm just not sure how valid that information was! Also, how did you find the work load at Humber? A lot of people say that at Ryerson it is pretty challenging especially throughout the first year (7 courses!). It's only 5 at Humber, right? Thanks in advance!




No I did not have trouble finding a job with my BN, I was offered a job from where I did my placement right away after graduation. From my knowledge many of my fellow graduates found jobs as well. Something I did not mention was that I graduated 2007, before the economy went sour, because at that time hospitals did not have hiring freezes (so they don't have to layoff existing nurses) and tight budgets (costly to hire and train new grads)like right now. The job market for new grads is almost non-existent right now. I know of family and friends who have graduated from Ryerson and Humber 2009-2010 who are jobless and still looking to this day. So regardless of what school you choose to go to, I think you might have a hard time finding work, but that could change 4-5 years from now, I don't know.

For the part where employers prefer a Bachelor of Science in Nursing vs a Bachelor of Nursing...umm I see no difference as I work with people with both at Toronto General (which is under University Health Network). I'm sure what you mean is when a job posting lists BScN as one of the qualifications. They really are the same degrees just different wording. I think when an employer sees an applicant with a BN applying to a posting that only mentions BScN they would make exceptions and recognize the BN.

Now about the workload, its not an easy program, I also worked part-time on weekends so for me it was pretty challenging. Of course there were those who failed which sucks because if you fail one subject you fail the entire year and have to redo it, but its like that at Ryerson and York too. I think as long as you work hard, you will be fine.

For the extra courses at Ryerson in first year, I can't comment on that, but I will tell you there are always going to be some useless courses that you will be required to take (example=electives) no matter what school you choose to go to.

Now with that all said, what do you want? because thats what it all really comes down to since you will be spending 4 years of your life studying at a school. Do you want to go to school downtown Toronto? Do you want to be surrounded by other university students or college students? Are you going to be living downtown? taking the bus? driving? Are you commuting, if so from where? etc. etc. One of the reasons I chose Humber nursing is because it was a 15 minute drive from my house.

BTW the passing rate for the CRNE exam (exam you must write after you obtain your degree to get your nursing license) is higher from Humber graduates than Ryerson graduates. My cousin that went to Ryerson for Nursing told me that one of her professors said that the passing rate for Rye students for 2009 was about 40%, of course she passed hers but some of her peers did not... I don't know just that that was interesting.

Hope this helps



First off, thank you for posting about your experience. It's nice to hear from someone who went to Humber ;)

When you say that you know people who are still jobless, do you mean that they can't find jobs in Toronto? Ontario? Canada? Or elsewhere, such as the US? Because I've heard there are lots of jobs for nurses in the states, and I'm not opposed to that. Just curious ;)
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A photo of Gecko Gecko

@kriskriskris9 wrote

@happygleek wrote

@kriskriskris9 wrote

@Gecko wrote
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.






As a graduate of Humber/University of New Brunswick's Nursing degree program, I can tell you there is no advantage of choosing Ryerson because you want to do your clinical placement or work at a downtown hospital (unless you live downtown, obviously) Like every other school that does nursing, Humber has ties and agreements with hospitals in the GTA and downtown. I have done clinical placements at Toronto General Hosiptal and St. Michael's downtown and work at Toronto General now. I also know of fellow graduates from my class at Humber that work at some of the downtown hospitals like Toronto General, St.Mikes, And St. Josephs HC. My point is don't think because Ryerson is downtown that you will have a better chance of doing your placement at one of the big downtown hospitals, you can easily get that by going to any of the other schools (Its nursing for gods sake!)

: )

It all depends what you really want



Did you have any trouble finding a job with a BN after you graduated? I read somewhere that some employers prefer someone with a BScN, as opposed to BN, I'm just not sure how valid that information was! Also, how did you find the work load at Humber? A lot of people say that at Ryerson it is pretty challenging especially throughout the first year (7 courses!). It's only 5 at Humber, right? Thanks in advance!




No I did not have trouble finding a job with my BN, I was offered a job from where I did my placement right away after graduation. From my knowledge many of my fellow graduates found jobs as well. Something I did not mention was that I graduated 2007, before the economy went sour, because at that time hospitals did not have hiring freezes (so they don't have to layoff existing nurses) and tight budgets (costly to hire and train new grads)like right now. The job market for new grads is almost non-existent right now. I know of family and friends who have graduated from Ryerson and Humber 2009-2010 who are jobless and still looking to this day. So regardless of what school you choose to go to, I think you might have a hard time finding work, but that could change 4-5 years from now, I don't know.

For the part where employers prefer a Bachelor of Science in Nursing vs a Bachelor of Nursing...umm I see no difference as I work with people with both at Toronto General (which is under University Health Network). I'm sure what you mean is when a job posting lists BScN as one of the qualifications. They really are the same degrees just different wording. I think when an employer sees an applicant with a BN applying to a posting that only mentions BScN they would make exceptions and recognize the BN.

Now about the workload, its not an easy program, I also worked part-time on weekends so for me it was pretty challenging. Of course there were those who failed which sucks because if you fail one subject you fail the entire year and have to redo it, but its like that at Ryerson and York too. I think as long as you work hard, you will be fine.

For the extra courses at Ryerson in first year, I can't comment on that, but I will tell you there are always going to be some useless courses that you will be required to take (example=electives) no matter what school you choose to go to.

Now with that all said, what do you want? because thats what it all really comes down to since you will be spending 4 years of your life studying at a school. Do you want to go to school downtown Toronto? Do you want to be surrounded by other university students or college students? Are you going to be living downtown? taking the bus? driving? Are you commuting, if so from where? etc. etc. One of the reasons I chose Humber nursing is because it was a 15 minute drive from my house.

BTW the passing rate for the CRNE exam (exam you must write after you obtain your degree to get your nursing license) is higher from Humber graduates than Ryerson graduates. My cousin that went to Ryerson for Nursing told me that one of her professors said that the passing rate for Rye students for 2009 was about 40%, of course she passed hers but some of her peers did not... I don't know just that that was interesting.

Hope this helps



I would like you to prove this 40% "PASS" rate. I would like to think that "IF" there was ONLY a 40% pass rate that the CNO would probably intervene and ask the faculty how they are prepping their students. Further, I would also think that the faculty would notice and do something about it. Stop saying BS on things you "hear" based on zero evidence.
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A photo of kriskriskris9 kriskriskris9

@Gecko wrote

@kriskriskris9 wrote

@happygleek wrote

@kriskriskris9 wrote

@Gecko wrote
Well, then I guess I stand corrected. From what I have been told by others that is what I was aware of, my fault for misleading the OP.

As for Ryerson's administration, Facilities, I have not had any trouble with it so far. Yes, they can lack a little on the facilites, however, with a new academic centre opening up this fall, and a new Image arts building, and a new Student Learning Centre within a couple years. Things will change.

I also mainly picked Ryerson for the advantage of working in downtown hospitals and the community placements we get for 3rd year.






As a graduate of Humber/University of New Brunswick's Nursing degree program, I can tell you there is no advantage of choosing Ryerson because you want to do your clinical placement or work at a downtown hospital (unless you live downtown, obviously) Like every other school that does nursing, Humber has ties and agreements with hospitals in the GTA and downtown. I have done clinical placements at Toronto General Hosiptal and St. Michael's downtown and work at Toronto General now. I also know of fellow graduates from my class at Humber that work at some of the downtown hospitals like Toronto General, St.Mikes, And St. Josephs HC. My point is don't think because Ryerson is downtown that you will have a better chance of doing your placement at one of the big downtown hospitals, you can easily get that by going to any of the other schools (Its nursing for gods sake!)

: )

It all depends what you really want



Did you have any trouble finding a job with a BN after you graduated? I read somewhere that some employers prefer someone with a BScN, as opposed to BN, I'm just not sure how valid that information was! Also, how did you find the work load at Humber? A lot of people say that at Ryerson it is pretty challenging especially throughout the first year (7 courses!). It's only 5 at Humber, right? Thanks in advance!




No I did not have trouble finding a job with my BN, I was offered a job from where I did my placement right away after graduation. From my knowledge many of my fellow graduates found jobs as well. Something I did not mention was that I graduated 2007, before the economy went sour, because at that time hospitals did not have hiring freezes (so they don't have to layoff existing nurses) and tight budgets (costly to hire and train new grads)like right now. The job market for new grads is almost non-existent right now. I know of family and friends who have graduated from Ryerson and Humber 2009-2010 who are jobless and still looking to this day. So regardless of what school you choose to go to, I think you might have a hard time finding work, but that could change 4-5 years from now, I don't know.

For the part where employers prefer a Bachelor of Science in Nursing vs a Bachelor of Nursing...umm I see no difference as I work with people with both at Toronto General (which is under University Health Network). I'm sure what you mean is when a job posting lists BScN as one of the qualifications. They really are the same degrees just different wording. I think when an employer sees an applicant with a BN applying to a posting that only mentions BScN they would make exceptions and recognize the BN.

Now about the workload, its not an easy program, I also worked part-time on weekends so for me it was pretty challenging. Of course there were those who failed which sucks because if you fail one subject you fail the entire year and have to redo it, but its like that at Ryerson and York too. I think as long as you work hard, you will be fine.

For the extra courses at Ryerson in first year, I can't comment on that, but I will tell you there are always going to be some useless courses that you will be required to take (example=electives) no matter what school you choose to go to.

Now with that all said, what do you want? because thats what it all really comes down to since you will be spending 4 years of your life studying at a school. Do you want to go to school downtown Toronto? Do you want to be surrounded by other university students or college students? Are you going to be living downtown? taking the bus? driving? Are you commuting, if so from where? etc. etc. One of the reasons I chose Humber nursing is because it was a 15 minute drive from my house.

BTW the passing rate for the CRNE exam (exam you must write after you obtain your degree to get your nursing license) is higher from Humber graduates than Ryerson graduates. My cousin that went to Ryerson for Nursing told me that one of her professors said that the passing rate for Rye students for 2009 was about 40%, of course she passed hers but some of her peers did not... I don't know just that that was interesting.

Hope this helps



I would like you to prove this 40% "PASS" rate. I would like to think that "IF" there was ONLY a 40% pass rate that the CNO would probably intervene and ask the faculty how they are prepping their students. Further, I would also think that the faculty would notice and do something about it. Stop saying BS on things you "hear" based on zero evidence.




My apologies Gecko, your absolutely right, I can't prove that. Thats just something I heard. I will ask my cousin more about that 40% pass rate, it does seem too low.

To clear up what you said about Humber's Nursing degree program not being accredited and being able to do your Master's Degree. YES YOU CAN DO YOUR MASTERS DEGREE!

It is accredited, check out CASNs website:
http://www.casn.ca/en/54.html

And check Humber's Website:
http://www.humber.ca/program/bachelor-nursing-bn#curriculum

"In 2006, the Humber College Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning, School of Health Sciences, educational unit and its collaborative nursing education program delivered in conjunction with the University of New Brunswick were granted accreditation by the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (CASN) for seven years. CASN accreditation is a combination of institutional and specialized accreditation in which a school’s educational unit and nursing education programs are assessed against peer-established standards of excellence.
For further information, visit casn.ca. This degree program is also endorsed by the College of Nurses of Ontario and approved by the New Brunswick Nurses Association, and the Ontario Provincial Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB)."

*One of the admission requirements listed on Ryerson's website for entrance to their Master of Nursing:
http://www.ryerson.ca/graduate/programs/nursing/admissions/course/index.html
"a Bachelor's degree in Nursing (or equivalent) from a program accredited by CASN or approved by the appropriate provincial body."

And another thing, about your 2 cents advising someone not to do a degree because it is not a "science" degree or "Bachelor of Science"......Hellooooo its Nursing!!!! A Bachelor of Science in Nursing is not the same as a General Bachelor of Science (ex Bio)degree. A Bachelor of Science in Nursing (the curriculum)is too specific/geared towards nursing courses. A BScN and a BN are considered equivalent programs. If you think a Bachelor of Science in Nursing is going to increase your chances of doing something like going to med school, umm your very wrong, go do a general Bachelor of Science degree in Health Sciences or something if thats where this idea is coming from.
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A photo of kriskriskris9 kriskriskris9
Leah93: Yes that is what I meant the job market is over saturated in Toronto, Ontario. There are jobs but you have to be willing to relocate to places like Calgary, BC, and the States. Most people I assume are not willing to do that because of student debt, they are married, they can't see themselves leaving their families or because they just can't see themselves leaving everything they know and starting a knew life somewhere. People have been saying that the job market (here) for Nurses will change when the baby boomers retire and yada yada, but who knows when that will happen since a lot of people are putting off retirment these days, it could be a while.
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A photo of Chucklez Chucklez

@kriskriskris9 wrote

As a graduate of Humber/University of New Brunswick's Nursing degree program, I can tell you there is no advantage of choosing Ryerson because you want to do your clinical placement or work at a downtown hospital (unless you live downtown, obviously) Like every other school that does nursing, Humber has ties and agreements with hospitals in the GTA and downtown. I have done clinical placements at Toronto General Hosiptal and St. Michael's downtown and work at Toronto General now. I also know of fellow graduates from my class at Humber that work at some of the downtown hospitals like Toronto General, St.Mikes, And St. Josephs HC. My point is don't think because Ryerson is downtown that you will have a better chance of doing your placement at one of the big downtown hospitals, you can easily get that by going to any of the other schools (Its nursing for gods sake!)
: )
It all depends what you really want



YES! A humber/unb graduate! Just a FEW questions:

What courses should I watch out for in this program? So far I'm doing pretty well (A's for the most part), but I've heard horror stories of Pharmacology and 2nd year biology courses.

How do I avoid having Soo Wong in my placement or classes again? Yes I had her, and yes it was absolutely BRUTAL! 40-50% of the students in my class didn't come back for this semester! (you must ABSOLUTELY loooove APA to be in her good side). I got a B in her class, and I concentrated in her class more than any others last sem.

As a male student, I'm been having trouble in my current placement with women who do not want men to provide care for them. What specific placements have you seen in your experiences that I should go for that doesn't have this issue?

How did you like the program when you were in Humber?

Thanks ;)

As for Gecko, the passing rate for each CRNE exam is really dependent on the cut-off mark for that exam. It could be 60% for one exam while 75% on the next one. Therefore, a 40% passing rate for Ryerson is a possibility, but in relation to other schools, it could be the same, higher, or lower.


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