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International Relations

A photo of sunflowerz sunflowerz
I've been looking over the courses offered at the University of Ottawa, and I was wondering if taking the "International Relations and Modern Languages" undergrad would be a smart choice if I wanted to pursue into Law afterwards.There are also a bunch of other similar undergraduate studies such as International Economics and Development, and Economics and Public Policy. Does anyone know anything about those courses? Greatly appreciated! :D
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A photo of Noval Noval

@sunflowerz wrote
I've been looking over the courses offered at the University of Ottawa, and I was wondering if taking the "International Relations and Modern Languages" undergrad would be a smart choice if I wanted to pursue into Law afterwards.There are also a bunch of other similar undergraduate studies such as International Economics and Development, and Economics and Public Policy. Does anyone know anything about those courses? Greatly appreciated! :D



No degree is the "best" for Law, you should take the one you find the easiest.
International Relations is known to be a project-heavy program...So if you hate preparing assignments at home that may end up counting for up to 40% of a final grade, do not take this program.

If you're the kind that prefers exams, you should just take the classical pre-law route, aka History/Political Science/Economy.
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A photo of sunflowerz sunflowerz

@Noval wrote

@sunflowerz wrote
I've been looking over the courses offered at the University of Ottawa, and I was wondering if taking the "International Relations and Modern Languages" undergrad would be a smart choice if I wanted to pursue into Law afterwards.There are also a bunch of other similar undergraduate studies such as International Economics and Development, and Economics and Public Policy. Does anyone know anything about those courses? Greatly appreciated! :D



No degree is the "best" for Law, you should take the one you find the easiest.
International Relations is known to be a project-heavy program...So if you hate preparing assignments at home that may end up counting for up to 40% of a final grade, do not take this program.

If you're the kind that prefers exams, you should just take the classical pre-law route, aka History/Political Science/Economy.



Thank you! Except, would you know the types of projects this may include?(Like essays, research papers...?)

As well, what is the difference between political science, international relations, and economy? I've looked at the courses and they seem kind of similar. I'm having a hard time choosing between them...
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A photo of Noval Noval

@sunflowerz wrote

@Noval wrote

@sunflowerz wrote
I've been looking over the courses offered at the University of Ottawa, and I was wondering if taking the "International Relations and Modern Languages" undergrad would be a smart choice if I wanted to pursue into Law afterwards.There are also a bunch of other similar undergraduate studies such as International Economics and Development, and Economics and Public Policy. Does anyone know anything about those courses? Greatly appreciated! :D



No degree is the "best" for Law, you should take the one you find the easiest.
International Relations is known to be a project-heavy program...So if you hate preparing assignments at home that may end up counting for up to 40% of a final grade, do not take this program.

If you're the kind that prefers exams, you should just take the classical pre-law route, aka History/Political Science/Economy.



Thank you! Except, would you know the types of projects this may include?(Like essays, research papers...?)

As well, what is the difference between political science, international relations, and economy? I've looked at the courses and they seem kind of similar. I'm having a hard time choosing between them...



You'll have to do assignments involving a lot of research, it will involve a lot of history/economy, but instead of learning it and then applying it straight into an exam, you'll have to search it and try to answer questions.

Political Science and Economy are quite familiar, both are graded mostly on exams, while IR is mostly graded on assignments.

If you got a sharp memory and don't want to change your habits, go for Political Science, History or Economy...If you think you'll do better with less exams but more projects, go for IR.
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A photo of sunflowerz sunflowerz

@Noval wrote

@sunflowerz wrote

@Noval wrote

@sunflowerz wrote
I've been looking over the courses offered at the University of Ottawa, and I was wondering if taking the "International Relations and Modern Languages" undergrad would be a smart choice if I wanted to pursue into Law afterwards.There are also a bunch of other similar undergraduate studies such as International Economics and Development, and Economics and Public Policy. Does anyone know anything about those courses? Greatly appreciated! :D



No degree is the "best" for Law, you should take the one you find the easiest.
International Relations is known to be a project-heavy program...So if you hate preparing assignments at home that may end up counting for up to 40% of a final grade, do not take this program.

If you're the kind that prefers exams, you should just take the classical pre-law route, aka History/Political Science/Economy.



Thank you! Except, would you know the types of projects this may include?(Like essays, research papers...?)

As well, what is the difference between political science, international relations, and economy? I've looked at the courses and they seem kind of similar. I'm having a hard time choosing between them...



You'll have to do assignments involving a lot of research, it will involve a lot of history/economy, but instead of learning it and then applying it straight into an exam, you'll have to search it and try to answer questions.

Political Science and Economy are quite familiar, both are graded mostly on exams, while IR is mostly graded on assignments.

If you got a sharp memory and don't want to change your habits, go for Political Science, History or Economy...If you think you'll do better with less exams but more projects, go for IR.



Ok, thank you for contrasting those programs! Another question, do you know about the job opportunities with International Relations? Are there many positions in the government? Or, is it basically like foreign affairs, diplomat...? I'm just not sure if it's dependable enough of an undergrad to choose, if i don't get into law.
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A photo of awaysheflew awaysheflew

@sunflowerz wrote


Ok, thank you for contrasting those programs! Another question, do you know about the job opportunities with International Relations? Are there many positions in the government? Or, is it basically like foreign affairs, diplomat...? I'm just not sure if it's dependable enough of an undergrad to choose, if i don't get into law.




About 99% of IR-related government positions will require AT LEAST a Master's degree, so keep that in mind. You may be able to find a position at an NGO with just an undergrad degree, but the competition for those jobs would be pretty fierce.
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A photo of Noval Noval

@sunflowerz wrote
Ok, thank you for contrasting those programs! Another question, do you know about the job opportunities with International Relations? Are there many positions in the government? Or, is it basically like foreign affairs, diplomat...? I'm just not sure if it's dependable enough of an undergrad to choose, if i don't get into law.




Like awaysheflew said earlier, the jobs in IR will need more than just a Bachelor's degree.
The job opportunities are vast with that kind of degree, you find IR grads in Government positions, Politics, NGOs, even in Finance and Consulting(You'll need your MBA for that one)...
Most of those who hold respectable positions in that field have qualifications ranging from Master's degrees to Ph.D.'s.

The career services and placement are not always great for these programs, but assuming you have good grades, are motivated and are ready to move somewhere else for a job, you will definitely find something that fits you.
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