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Introducing yourself to the teacher

A photo of hasek hasek
So I&#39;ve heard from family members currently in university that many people introduce themselves to their profs the first week. <br>So is it really that important, and how would i do so without making it awkward?
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A photo of threepointonefour threepointonefour
Personally I didn't introduce myself to my professors during the first week, but it may help you feel more connected to the class. I'd say its not a bad idea, because that way you're not intimidated to talk to them later in the year if you need help. My suggestion would be to visit them during their office hours. This is the time when they are at their desk with an open door for students who need a hand. Since no one will need a hand in the first week, you should be able to waltz in and have a chat.
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A photo of vel vel
If you have any questions, ask at the end of class, don't hesitate.

If it's major, visit office hours. Not enough people do either of those. Do it enough, and the professor is bound to at least know your face and that you're dedicated.

That being said however, tons of people get by without ever exchanging a word to their professors, so it isn't really a priority, but don't ever go home with a doubt on your mind.
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A photo of hasek hasek
So im taking it as that during the first week, i should see the teachers? But what should i talk to them about? Just a quick background of myself?
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A photo of CatRunner CatRunner
For starters, don't call them teachers. At university, they are professors.

If you want to introduce yourself, go visit them during office hours and ask them something about the course or what they covered in the first couple of classes. Or look into what type of research they do and go and ask them about their research. Don't just go in and start talking about yourself. Go in and ask them specific questions about the course or their research.

Introduce yourself as a student in their "such-and-such" course, and then ask a specific question. Hopefully they will then ask who you are and a bit about you, but don't just go in and start talking about yourself. You want to demonstrate an interest in the course material or the prof's research, not in yourself.
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A photo of ktel ktel
^ This. I wouldn't just go in to tell them about yourself. That's a little weird. Go in and ask intelligent questions. Questions that you pretty much already know the answer to, but need a little more clarification. During that time you can introduce yourself and maybe they'll be open to a little more discussion.

Personally I never did this. I never really had questions that I couldn't figure out myself or from friends. However, I was one of the few blonde girls in engineering and I did quite well in my classes, so many of my professors knew me or knew of me as a result
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A photo of Gorges26 Gorges26

@hasek wrote
So I've heard from family members currently in university that many people introduce themselves to their profs the first week.
So is it really that important, and how would i do so without making it awkward?



You won't score brownie points by introducing yourself to the prof. Just be polite when asking questions. Profs have too many students in first year to care who you are. UNLESS you're trying to net a volunteering position or something with that prof, I wouldn't bother.
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A photo of scoobygiggles scoobygiggles
I'd say it all depends on your class sizes. I go to Nipissing University, and most of my classes had 30 people or under. There was quite a bit of one-on-one time with the professors, which was amazingly helpful. For large classes (and I did have one or two in an amphitheater type room), sit nearish to the front, participate in discussions, and do take the opportunity to ask questions or for clarification during breaks or at the end of class. Out of 300 people, my professor knew me by name and approached me to help mark papers for extra cash.
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