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Is concurrent education for me?

A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac
I'm a high school student going in to grade 12 in September, and I'm interested in becoming a teacher.
Concurrent education appeals to me because I would be able to gain more teaching experience, and because I wouldn't have to worry about getting into teacher's college after I finish my undergrad.

However, arts and science programs also really appeal to me.
Although I know I want to be a teacher, I don't know whether I want to go into the sciences or the arts. I love them both, and a double major in arts and science would be nice.

Also, as of now, I don't have much experience or good extracurriculars I could write about in my application. I'm doing a co-op at an elementary school in grade 12, but it's in second semester, after applications are due, so I'm not sure how that would help. Another question: If I decided to go to teacher's college after my undergrad, would they even care that I took co-op in high school? How hard would it be to get into teacher's college?

So yeah, I'm kind of conflicted right now. I need to start researching universities now, because application time is coming up soon!

Basically I can't decide between
artsci + teacher's college
and
concurrent education
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A photo of Viking21 Viking21

@CrèmeGlacée wrote
I'm a high school student going in to grade 12 in September, and I'm interested in becoming a teacher.
Concurrent education appeals to me because I would be able to gain more teaching experience, and because I wouldn't have to worry about getting into teacher's college after I finish my undergrad.

However, arts and science programs also really appeal to me.
Although I want to be a teacher, I don't know whether I want to go into the sciences or the arts. I love them both, and a double major in arts and science would be nice.

Also, as of now, I don't have much experience or good extracurriculars I could write about in my application. I'm doing a co-op at an elementary school in grade 12, but it's in second semester, after applications are due, so I'm not sure how that would help. Another question: If I decided to go to teacher's college after my undergrad, would they even care that I took co-op in high school? How hard would it be to get into teacher's college?

So yeah, I'm kind of conflicted right now. I need to start researching universities now, because application time is coming up soon!




yes the co-op u do in high school is valuable for future reference. you can put it on your resume and get possible references (i think you will look better when applying for jobs then others who just graduated without any experience)....start making good networks from now.
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac
Good point about networking :)

Like I said, the reason why artsci appeals to me is because I love both. But I wonder if it is worth it...
For my teachables, would I need to major in both subjects? Would it be advantageous to do so?
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
You can still study a wide variety of subjects in BA and BSc programs at most institutions (in fact, some like UofT require it). With that in mind, you wouldn't be losing too much over an arts and sciences degree if you did concurrent education, because you can still take courses from all of your favourite subjects. In conclusion, don't let your interest in multiple subject inhibit you from doing con.ed - it's an amazing option for all people who want to be teachers!

Also, as to your question about how teachables work, you need to take certain numbers of courses from certain subjects to get them to be a teachable subject. The subjects do not need to be an official major or minor. Your first teachable has to be something you took 5 credits in. Second teachable subjects have 3 credits in them. Every subject thereafter requires 2 credits in the subject to be able to teach it. The only exception to this is that for French to be a teachable you need to have 4 credits in it (even as a 2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc... teachable). In con.ed programs, they sometimes are even more restrictive for your teachables but it's all in an effort to make sure that you have the necessary knowledge to teach the courses in that subject without problems. For example, in Queen's & Queen's-Trent, they tell you specifically which courses to take to count for your teachable and they also require 4 credits for ALL 2nd teachables, not just French.

It's because of the extra requirements that I chose to go into P/J. I want to eventually be qualified for all divisions, so I may as well get qualified for the ones without the "special requirements" in my undergrad, keeping in mind that I need to take enough courses to be able to do the AQ later.
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac
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A photo of Omok Omok
=) Freak out, but not too much.

try and do your best, and you'll be fine. =)

Honestly, the only really hard ones to get into is the con-ed program at trent-queen's and queen's.

For everything else, just roll with it, get the marks, and don't worry too much about the ECs (unless you've got nothing, then, yeah, worry...lol...)

there are transferable skills that can be learnt through almost everything that can be applied to teaching. --- You just need to know how to magnify those skills in your application, and show that they're really useful.

don't stress out too much, the end results may surprise you. =)

Try your best and aim high!
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
Not all Con.Ed programs require PSEs, so don't freak out! Even if you don't end up going to Queen's or Trent, ALL other universities that offer con.ed will get you certified as a teacher in Ontario. At that point it becomes not where you went, but rather the experiences you had throughout your placements and professional development, then the portfolio you make out of it.

Of course the PSE means that your peers will be more committed to the occupation, and there are certain benefits to having a community like that. It means that your program will often carry a decent reputation as giving good teachers and student teachers to the teaching community. It means that you will surround yourself with like-minded people, not simply those who are doing con.ed to give direction to their BAs. That means that professional development experiences and similar events will be more popular and consequently be more plentiful to give you opportunities to beef up that portfolio.

I can tell you that you need not have an abundance of great long-term commitments related to teaching. What I suggest is to select activities for your PSE/essay from the following areas: long-term commitment, affinity for education and lastly your leadership potential. This does not necessarily have to be in a "conventional" experience - your life is valuable and as long as you can justify why your experiences are relevant you'll do fine. For example, consider your life from the following perspectives: volunteerism, family, friends (be careful here...), extra-curriculars, paid employment and even hobbies. You may not think your years on the school basketball team are relevant (if you were a basketball player), but they show your ability to commit and stay determined over a long period of time.

If you have any questions about anything related to con.ed please email me. This includes comparisons, admissions, program details and more.
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac

@Ba Ba Blue wrote
Not all Con.Ed programs require PSEs, so don't freak out! Even if you don't end up going to Queen's or Trent, ALL other universities that offer con.ed will get you certified as a teacher in Ontario. At that point it becomes not where you went, but rather the experiences you had throughout your placements and professional development, then the portfolio you make out of it.

Of course the PSE means that your peers will be more committed to the occupation, and there are certain benefits to having a community like that. It means that your program will often carry a decent reputation as giving good teachers and student teachers to the teaching community. It means that you will surround yourself with like-minded people, not simply those who are doing con.ed to give direction to their BAs. That means that professional development experiences and similar events will be more popular and consequently be more plentiful to give you opportunities to beef up that portfolio.

I can tell you that you need not have an abundance of great long-term commitments related to teaching. What I suggest is to select activities for your PSE/essay from the following areas: long-term commitment, affinity for education and lastly your leadership potential. This does not necessarily have to be in a "conventional" experience - your life is valuable and as long as you can justify why your experiences are relevant you'll do fine. For example, consider your life from the following perspectives: volunteerism, family, friends (be careful here...), extra-curriculars, paid employment and even hobbies. You may not think your years on the school basketball team are relevant (if you were a basketball player), but they show your ability to commit and stay determined over a long period of time.

If you have any questions about anything related to con.ed please email me. This includes comparisons, admissions, program details and more.




Thanks so much for your help!!!

Now I've got a new question. How much does high school co-op help? I was planning on doing co-op at an elementary school but now I'm reconsidering the IB program- which means no co-op for me. However, with IB, I will be forced to have 50 hours each of creativity, action and service... which means lots of extracurriculars and volunteering.
I can't decide. Co-op sounded liked a really useful program for me... but I don't want to leave IB either.
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A photo of Ba Ba Blue Ba Ba Blue
CrèmeGlacée, I hope you realize you solved your own problem. Volunteer somewhere with kids (pool, community centre, etc.), get CAS hours, graduate with an IB diploma! I know doing a placement in schools is ideal, but I don't think it's worth leaving IB over it. IB is a great experience that will get you university transfer credits most likely.
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A photo of Cr?meGlac Cr?meGlac

@Ba Ba Blue wrote
CrèmeGlacée, I hope you realize you solved your own problem. Volunteer somewhere with kids (pool, community centre, etc.), get CAS hours, graduate with an IB diploma! I know doing a placement in schools is ideal, but I don't think it's worth leaving IB over it. IB is a great experience that will get you university transfer credits most likely.



Yeah, I decided to stay in IB. Hopefully I'll survive it. CAS hours is the only thing I'm really excited about xD
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