yconic - Is it possible for an indvidual who is not good in math & physics to become a chemical engineer?
Hide Menu

My Feed Money for School Student Help Brands Winners Support Center



Explore yconic
Explore Student Life Topics
Scotiabank
STUDENT CHAMPION
yconic proudly recognizes Student Champion Partners who are providing our community with superior support for their student journeys. Learn More
Student Help Brands

Is it possible for an indvidual who is not good in math & physics to become a chemical engineer?

A photo of milliex51 milliex51
My passion is learning about Chemistry, and I wanted to be a chemist or a chemical engineer when I was in grade 9 but now that I'm in grade 11 and researching about the career as a chemist-- I realize there aren't that many job offers, and the pay is low for 4-5 years in grad school. I'm a weakling in math and physics, I currently have a 75 in MCR3U and a 90 in Physics due to unit works, but surely my average will dramatically decrease when it comes to our final exams, because for my first unit test I got a 60 </3.

Anyway, I really want to do well in math and physics and I have a grade 12 tutor who tutors me during lunch school hours. I'm also planning to get a tutor outside of school for calculus next year. Any advice? :bounce:
Was this helpful? Yes 0
6 replies
 
A photo of plato plato
In physics, since you are doing well in course work and not so well on exams, maybe you can stand to improve your examination skills?

You will need decent math skills in chem. eng. You would need to pull up your MHF4U, MCV4U and SPH4U to a minimum of 80% if you want to attend one of the more competitive schools.

I have a friend who took pure chemistry rather than chem. eng., and she says the chem eng is easier, because it is all applied. But this means more math.

The chemical industry is highly industrial based. The work turns out to be more project management. You can get into fields like analytical chemistry, which is more hands on, but even that is becoming more automated with only small niches remaining for hands-on work. Unless of course you pursue graduate school and work in the research sector.

Sorry, just thinking out loud there, I'm sure you've done your research.

If your passion is chemistry, using the techniques you outlined (tutoring for math..etc), I'm positive you can make it in chem. eng. or pure chemistry. Don't worry about the money, worry about being happy with your livelihood :)
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of plaidboy plaidboy
No, it's not possible. Was that the answer you were looking for? Anythings possible. If you get the help you need from teachers by making yourself available and taking initiative, there's no reason why you can't get good marks.

The trick about getting high marks is: 1) don't overthink the questions on a test/exam, 2) practice as much medium/hard questions as you can, 3) go past the textbook and get your hands on old test papers, other textbooks, etc. and try very hard questions. This well help expand your thinking, and if your thinking level isn't that great for physics, then try as much as you can and then show the teacher for help. In my school the teachers are glad to help with any question outside the textbook, even past test papers. If you do these 3, it'll be hard not to get a mid 80 in physics.

And for math just try as much questions as you need, to feel confident so you can remember it the next week. If you use the mcgraw hill textbook at your school, do the extend and challenge questions, as well as the chapter test because they come with tricky questions to practice. Also, before the test do the chapter review and get your friends tests as well.

This will definitely help you in both grade 12 and university for sure.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
It's obviously possible, but you should start looking into other fields if math and physics scare you that much. Don't give up though, there's a lot of time left to improve :)
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of imaginaryengineer imaginaryengineer
Do you like physics?

Because the chem you will doing in chemical engineering is more applied then that performed by a chemist or other. You will perform more math and physics.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of broodp4 broodp4
No, impossible. U need to step it up and become good at math and physics or go home. Engineering is near impossible if u suck at math. Chem will still be difficult because it's still pretty math heavy.

Ps: also go MIT or go home(Jk)
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of milliex51 milliex51
Thank you guys for the feedback!
Was this helpful? Yes 0