yconic - Is it true that it is hard to get an ENGINEERING job after your degree?
Hide Menu

My Feed Money for School Student Help Brands Winners Support Center



Explore yconic
Explore Student Life Topics
Scotiabank
STUDENT CHAMPION
yconic proudly recognizes Student Champion Partners who are providing our community with superior support for their student journeys. Learn More
Student Help Brands

Is it true that it is hard to get an ENGINEERING job after your degree?

A photo of brady23 brady23
My friend wanted to go into Engineering, but is now second guessing himself because he heard about some people who still don't have jobs after their degree. To be honest, I always hear how hard it is to get an engineering job.

What are some things you can do to make sure this doesn't happen to you?

I know you can apply for coop to give you a step up, but what else can you do?
Was this helpful? Yes 0
23 replies
 
A photo of ktel ktel
Have family friends or family members who work in engineering companies. Networking.

Also, no duh that some people are not employed. No field is 100% employable
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of krankd krankd
^ except for actuarial science :p
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of caveman caveman

@krankd wrote
^ except for actuarial science :p


I'm guessing you're being sarcastic, and just pointing out that actuarial science grads are in very high demand. As ktel said, no field is 100% employable.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of ktel ktel
Not only is no field 100% employable, but some graduates don't even want to work in their field afterwards.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of brady23 brady23

@ktel wrote
Not only is no field 100% employable, but some graduates don't even want to work in their field afterwards.



Well yes, but compared to Business / Nursing degrees, why is it so much harder for Engineering degrees to find jobs? Doesn't that worry any future engineers here?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
I'm pretty sure engineers have a much easier time than business grads? I'm also pretty sure that an engineering undergrad is one of the most employable degrees anyone could ever get...
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of sascer520 sascer520

@brady23 wrote

@ktel wrote
Not only is no field 100% employable, but some graduates don't even want to work in their field afterwards.



Well yes, but compared to Business / Nursing degrees, why is it so much harder for Engineering degrees to find jobs? Doesn't that worry any future engineers here?




Yes, it does worry me that employment in engineering can be bleak, but that is true for a lot of other fields too. Nursing is in the health sector and due to the aging population of Ontario, there will be jobs for them.( I think). Anyways, yes it very much does worry me, and it is a reason why I am planning on keeping my options open in university. I was thinking of Victory lapping but the only thing it will do for me is to delay the decision-making process, and on the bright side earn some money working part-time.

I really do want to be an engineer, but I don't see the point in having massive OSAP debt with very little guarantee whatsoever that I will be able to pay it off after 6 months. I know many people who don't even work in their preferred field of study. I don't want to do that.

I am also second guessing university in its entirety. Sure the post-secondary education is worth it. Sure I'll be able to extract vast amounts of knowledge with the money I borrow, but it is a lot of work for little guarantee. What am I considering them? Victory Lapping. Possibly, Skilled Trades. But since everyone else is doing it, lets go to university. lol :P
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of ktel ktel

@brady23 wrote

@ktel wrote
Not only is no field 100% employable, but some graduates don't even want to work in their field afterwards.



Well yes, but compared to Business / Nursing degrees, why is it so much harder for Engineering degrees to find jobs? Doesn't that worry any future engineers here?



I wouldn't lump business in with nursing. Maybe I have a different outlook coming from Alberta, but all my engineering friends found jobs, many of my business friends are still looking (I graduated in April). I'm not worried about finding a job.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of caveman caveman

@brady23 wrote

@ktel wrote
Not only is no field 100% employable, but some graduates don't even want to work in their field afterwards.



Well yes, but compared to Business / Nursing degrees, why is it so much harder for Engineering degrees to find jobs? Doesn't that worry any future engineers here?


Business majors don't have a free ride. There are so many unemployed business majors (or just working a regular part-time/full-time job in fast food or retail or something). At some of the top programs the vast majority of graduates may find employment, but this is not representative of the entire field.

Also, business majors can work almost anywhere, so this may make it seem easier. Every company needs accountants, marketers, management, etc. But some places just aren't going to be hiring engineers. Take a geological engineer: they can be very knowledgeable and skilled, but there's a very small percentage of companies that actually hire geo engineers.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
This post was deleted

 
A photo of WaterfallOfDestiny WaterfallOfDestiny
An engineering degree is as employable an undergraduate degree as you can get (maybe except for materials engineering). In the end, employers are looking for personality, drive, initiative, and passion for what their company does. All the degree does is tell them that you may have those prerequisite skills.

Look up what the most employable university degrees are. Engineering ones take over the list.

About skilled trades, some people actually can't find apprenticeships. I've read that industry complains that we need more tradespeople (without hiring Canadian-trained tradespeople...) so that they can hire foreign, non-unionized workers on the cheap.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of kylepohl kylepohl
I don't know what the hell people are talking about here: Graduating with an Engineering degree may as well be a golden ticket as far as I'm concerned. If you have any drive whatsoever towards anything to do with Engineering, you will find a high paying job right out of university. Do a program with co-op (I'm at Waterloo, for instance, working for Suncor, a high class petroleum company) and your chances seriously skyrocket. I know people left and right getting offers for Apple, for Google, some getting 70, 80, 150k right out of university. Engineers of all stripes are in demand all across the map. Plus, if you finish an Engineering degree, you get instant respect wherever you go, which is useful for branching off into other career paths, which is very common.

Again, do co-op and not only will you score a sweet job (with a great deal of work, of course) but what you earn may just pay for your tuition.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of WaterfallOfDestiny WaterfallOfDestiny
To the OP: Read this article from Tuesday's Toronto Star and tell me you still think engineering is unemployable.

"For every 7 job openings in [computer and engineering] professions in the Greater Toronto Area, there is just one qualified recent graduate of a post-secondary program, a new study shows."
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles

@WaterfallOfDestiny wrote
To the OP: Read this article from Tuesday's Toronto Star and tell me you still think engineering is unemployable.

"For every 7 job openings in [computer and engineering] professions in the Greater Toronto Area, there is just one qualified recent graduate of a post-secondary program, a new study shows."


My teacher just made me read that in homeroom today. :D
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of WaterfallOfDestiny WaterfallOfDestiny
Haha, I remember when my high school computer science teacher tried to recruit Grade 10 students into taking compsci courses, he'd first hand out these kinds of articles, and proceed to talk about how employers are dying for computer skills. =D
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of iliketurtles iliketurtles
Obviously my homeroom is comp sci :P
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of steele steele
Speaking from experience here: I went to a couple career fairs for U of T engineering students this year (You're Next is the big one), and it's actually unreal how many companies are hiring students from electrical and computer engineering. I guarantee you, if you're passing ECE and have the ability to form coherent English sentences, you'll get a job.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of AgriGen AgriGen
The above posters are all correct. If you are simply concerned about employment engineering is one of the best choices. Be careful about what you hear from people - most people are just using anecdotal evidence. Check out the employment rate of engineers in these links. Not all engineering programs are made equal though remember that.

http://analysis.uwaterloo.ca/statistics/cudo/cudo_2010/htmlSectionK.php#sectionk2

http://www.utoronto.ca/about-uoft/measuring-our-performance/cudo/cudo-2009/other.htm

http://www.ryerson.ca/about/data/k-other/#key

http://www.uoguelph.ca/analysis_planning/cudo/other/
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of brady23 brady23
Thanks for all your advice, especially the ones with articles!

I always heard about engineering being the most employable degree and it makes sense, but I guess I let all these people around me who told me that engineering has no jobs, etc.

FYI, this wasn't for me though since I'm not going into Engineering, but for my friend, because I was kinda shocked when he told me that he might go into Political Science because he heard there were no Engineering jobs in Toronto.
It's probably 10x easier to get an engineering job that a political science job.

I have one more question. How helpful is coop for engineering?
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of Anonymous Anonymous

@brady23 wrote
Thanks for all your advice, especially the ones with articles!

I always heard about engineering being the most employable degree and it makes sense, but I guess I let all these people around me who told me that engineering has no jobs, etc.

FYI, this wasn't for me though since I'm not going into Engineering, but for my friend, because I was kinda shocked when he told me that he might go into Political Science because he heard there were no Engineering jobs in Toronto.
It's probably 10x easier to get an engineering job that a political science job.

I have one more question. How helpful is coop for engineering?



Co-op is really important, my sister did her's when she was at Waterloo and it helped out big time. Let's just say she had jobs lined up after graduation!
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of AgriGen AgriGen

@brady23 wrote
Thanks for all your advice, especially the ones with articles!

I always heard about engineering being the most employable degree and it makes sense, but I guess I let all these people around me who told me that engineering has no jobs, etc.

FYI, this wasn't for me though since I'm not going into Engineering, but for my friend, because I was kinda shocked when he told me that he might go into Political Science because he heard there were no Engineering jobs in Toronto.
It's probably 10x easier to get an engineering job that a political science job.

I have one more question. How helpful is coop for engineering?



Tell your friend engineering is one the most employable degrees out there. If hes worried about finding a job he shouldnt be, especially if he goes to certain universities.

How helpful is coop? I am not in engineering but I am a senior at the university of waterloo (I use to be in coop). I dont think coop is a big deal for a lot of majors but coop for engineering I have to say looks pretty dope. Jealous of a lot of these software engineers!

Important lesson here is not to take peoples opinions as facts. Do some digging for evidence as you have done here ;)
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of ktel ktel
Co-op is a big deal for EVERY major. Relevant work experience puts you ahead of most university grads.
Was this helpful? Yes 0

 
A photo of AgriGen AgriGen
Hmm I partially agree. Work experience definitely does put you ahead of other grads. But coop is not necessary for work experience. I wont speak for every university but here in waterloo there is obvious differences between coop prospects for some majors vs others.
Was this helpful? Yes 0